Apple iPad owners report Wi-Fi connection issues

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 164
    gqbgqb Posts: 1,934member
    It'll go like this.

    If its a software/firmware issue, there'll be a patch pretty quickly.

    If its hardware, there will be an option to swap in for fixed if necessary.

    I'm hardly worried.



    Personally, I've seen low bars in my home at times, but always have good responsiveness.

    I'm going to load "Speed Test" tonight and compare to my iPhone.
  • Reply 42 of 164
    I am not sure if this has been the case with others... First, I am a massive Apple fan (4 Macs, 4iPods, 2 iPhones) and have ordered the iPad 3g. With that said, I had this same, exact problem with my original iPhone 3g. It took multiple compliants (even to the BBB) and multiple replacements form Apple before my WiFi problems was resolved. ALL of the problems originated when iPhone 3G 3.x OS was released. I really, really hope this does not happen when I get my iPad 3g
  • Reply 43 of 164
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by nishin View Post


    Just for the record, a PC sitting next to my Mac can detect far more networks in a given area, compared to a Mac. Why ??



    There are potentially differences between PC vendors, but using Windows won'y make a PC's WiFi HW any better designed. You're confusing detecting WiFi access points with displaying WiFi access points. Apple's SW won't necessarily show you every WiFI connection in the area if the noise is too high and the signal too weak for you to connect to it. You can run apps that show you every WiFI network.
  • Reply 44 of 164
    awmawmawmawm Posts: 67member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by nishin View Post


    Hi,



    I totally agree with you. I have had a MacBook Pro for about 7 years now. First the PPC and then the Intel versions from Panther, through Tiger to Leopard. Never had a WiFi connection issue with Panther and Tiger.



    But with the Intel MacBook Pro's with Leopard, I have started having issues with Wifi connectivity, whether using No Authentication/WPA/WPA2 in combination with a Linksys

    Home router. The Mac would randomly connect, work for a while and then disconnect randomly.



    Any attempt to reconnect would result in a "Connection Timed Out" message. I am not sure if they are using the same drivers/hardware between the Macbook Pro's and iPhone/iPad devices. In any case, after reading the above comments, I sincerely believe that Apple has serious issues with their WiFi implementation and really needs to get its act together and deliver a defect free product that works as expected, consistently.



    Just for the record, a PC sitting next to my Mac can detect far more networks in a given area, compared to a Mac. Why ?? Is the Mac's WiFi implementation inferior ? How were they able to pass and retain WiFi certification ????



    Apple, please get your act together so that your Apple fans are not driven away towards PCs or competitor devices, which are inferior in other aspects .



    Thanks



    Regards,

    Nishi



    I switched from Windows to Mac OS X because connecting to WiFi was always an issue (besides not being able to awake the Windows machine from sleep correctly...). Sit in an airport lounge and watch how long it takes Windows users to get connected and how quickly the Mac users are up and running...
  • Reply 45 of 164
    soskoksoskok Posts: 107member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by antkm1 View Post


    I've been posting about the issues with Wi-Fi for at least 2 years on this forum. WiFi is not all it's cracked up to being. Now i don't yet have an iPad (waiting for the 3G) but my iphone 3G has very spotty problems with WiFi. Way too slow, to many users, diffuclty loggin on when they are web-based and not just account based. Panera has finally shapped up thier WiFi but others are still forcing you to log on through a website that has to remain open for you to use. The ATT free WiFi is worthless. Plus you can't use it in the car (yet). The only GOOD WiFi i've been able to use is my router at home. Now i hope i won't have the problem some have when you use both the iPhone and iPad at the same time, but we'll see. I just hope some of these bugs get fixed by the time i purchase mine. I'm waiting to see what the Chrome OS machines turn out to be (due out in the fall), but i'm affriad they will be a joke compared to the iPad.



    Do you really expect wifi hotspots (especially free once) to be as good as your home broadband?
  • Reply 46 of 164
    ktappektappe Posts: 823member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by nishin View Post


    Just for the record, a PC sitting next to my Mac can detect far more networks in a given area, compared to a Mac. Why ?? Is the Mac's WiFi implementation inferior ? How were they able to pass and retain WiFi certification ????



    Most likely because Apple insists on using aluminum cases for their computers. Think about how silly it is that they keep putting a Faraday cage around their WiFi antennas. Yes, the Macs/iPads look good, but form should follow function, Mr. Ive.
  • Reply 47 of 164
    nceencee Posts: 857member
    Well I know that I can't get on MANY (To many) wi-fi connections with my Mac laptop, when it shouldn't be an issue? Maybe what ever causes that problem is the same with the iPad.



    I say this, because my girl friends room mates can get on the 4 wi-fi connections (with her PC) in her neighborhood, (Starbucks, Mr. Bagels & 2 small diners), while I can't get on them with my laptop (MBP 17").



    This isn't a one time thing either. We all go to these places regularly and I'll have my laptop, and can't get on, but she gets right on with her PC (which she REALLY loves to rub in).



    I can get on other wi-fi's in the area MOST of the time, but not all?



    I can see the connections, but can't get on?



    Skip
  • Reply 48 of 164
    inline1inline1 Posts: 10member
    I have had no issues either, even my wife can use it with little to no help!
  • Reply 49 of 164
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by greg30127 View Post


    Why? Is it unreasonable for people to want a company to properly and thoroughly test their products before they release them onto retail stores? I don't think it's unreasonable at all. Is it a common practice among manufacturers now? Unfortunately, no. But SHOULD it be? Yes! And it's certainly not "asinine" for us to want it.



    Yes, it is absolutely asinine and unrealistic to expect that every single component built in every single factory along every single point of the process be tested by Apple before it touches your greasy hands. There is also a possibility of the shipment being jostled so hard that it caused issues so your suggesting that every single Apple product be tested means that Apple should open up every single box right before it touches your hands and test it thoroughly before giving it to you. You honestly can't see how testing every single product is impossible or how there will be issues will all CE at some point somewhere? What we should expect is Apple to continually work to lower the percentage of issues and to continue to offer a great policy if their are any.
  • Reply 50 of 164
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ktappe View Post


    Most likely because Apple insists on using aluminum cases for their computers. Think about how silly it is that they keep putting a Faraday cage around their WiFi antennas. Yes, the Macs/iPads look good, but form should follow function, Mr. Ive.



    Actually, the wifi antenna is centered on the plastic apple logo on the back of the iPad.
  • Reply 51 of 164
    matrix07matrix07 Posts: 1,993member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ktappe View Post


    Most likely because Apple insists on using aluminum cases for their computers. Think about how silly it is that they keep putting a Faraday cage around their WiFi antennas. Yes, the Macs/iPads look good, but form should follow function, Mr. Ive.



    If that's the case, shouldn't the problem be universal, not just some batches?
  • Reply 52 of 164
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    Yes, it is absolutely asinine and unrealistic to expect that every single component built in every single factory along every single point of the process be tested by Apple before it touches your greasy hands. There is also a possibility of the shipment being jostled so hard that it caused issues so your suggesting that every single Apple product be tested means that Apple should open up every single box right before it touches your hands and test it thoroughly before giving it to you. You honestly can't see how testing every single product is impossible or how there will issues will all CE at some point somewhere? What we should expect is Apple to continually work to lower the percentage of issues and to continue to offer a great policy if their are any.



    I suppose I'll spell it out for you...



    I don't suggest they open every box. I'm saying if there is a design flaw in this device that causes it to not work as well as it could/should, then the device functionality/design should have been tested before it was produced, boxed, and shipped to stores, smart-ass.
  • Reply 53 of 164
    soskoksoskok Posts: 107member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ncee View Post


    Well I know that I can't get on MANY (To many) wi-fi connections with my Mac laptop, when it shouldn't be an issue? Maybe what ever causes that problem is the same with the iPad.



    I say this, because my girl friends room mates can get on the 4 wi-fi connections (with her PC) in her neighborhood, (Starbucks, Mr. Bagels & 2 small diners), while I can't get on them with my laptop (MBP 17").



    This isn't a one time thing either. We all go to these places regularly and I'll have my laptop, and can't get on, but she gets right on with her PC (which she REALLY loves to rub in).



    I can get on other wi-fi's in the area MOST of the time, but not all?



    I can see the connections, but can't get on?



    Skip



    Why restarting ur laptop is such a problem for all of u? Anythig doesn't work properly RESTART! dont tell me u r not used to that fact . ur not kids and not using a computer for the first day. it only takes about 2 minutes on models released since 2008. And Windows has the same problem but before 7 it took a year to restart any pc laptop.
  • Reply 54 of 164
    masternavmasternav Posts: 442member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ktappe View Post


    Most likely because Apple insists on using aluminum cases for their computers. Think about how silly it is that they keep putting a Faraday cage around their WiFi antennas. Yes, the Macs/iPads look good, but form should follow function, Mr. Ive.



    Them stoopid moroons at Apple done gone and done it agin. Nutjobs went and designed a case without thinkin' one bit about that thar antenny for the wareless. What kinda goofus don't slap some plastic on thar to make sure them lil photons or whatever they is ken git from the laptop antenny to the base thingy antenny?



    No really. I'm sure that they didn't do any signal interference checking based on the protypes with the aluminum enclosure at all. Nope. There isn't a single engineer at Apple that understands radio technology, or how to position and cover a WiFi antenna. Apple has failed utterly to understand and speak to a basic technology for the last decade. Insightful and cutting observation sir! Yes indeed!
  • Reply 55 of 164
    paulmjohnsonpaulmjohnson Posts: 1,380member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by greg30127 View Post


    Why? Is it unreasonable for people to want a company to properly and thoroughly test their products before they release them onto retail stores? I don't think it's unreasonable at all. Is it a common practice among manufacturers now? Unfortunately, no. But SHOULD it be? Yes! And it's certainly not "asinine" for us to want it.



    Take digital cameras for a slightly off-topic example: In the late 1990s, so few models were released each year, the makers took more time to test them. You almost never heard of models hitting store shelves with defects. Today, each maker poops out 2 dozen models a year or more - you hear of defective lenses, dust inside the lenses when you get them, feature glitches, sensor glitches, etc etc.. all because they are not properly tested before released. The same goes for every computer maker including Apple - they are so worried about profit and getting stuff out as quick as possible, they're using US to "test" the models for them, instead of doing it themselves... and no, it's not right.



    Do many consumer electronics have defects in them these days? Yes. Is it asinine for us to expect better quality? No. We have but two ways however, to make this well known and heard to the manufacturers - don't buy the stuff when it first hits shelves, and when the first sign of any issue comes up, don't bother with waiting for firmware fixes or spending your $$ to ship them back to be repaired - just take it back for a refund and make the manufacturer deal with massive returns. Period.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    Yes, it is absolutely asinine and unrealistic to expect that every single component built in every single factory along every single point of the process be tested by Apple before it touches your greasy hands. There is also a possibility of the shipment being jostled so hard that it caused issues so your suggesting that every single Apple product be tested means that Apple should open up every single box right before it touches your hands and test it thoroughly before giving it to you. You honestly can't see how testing every single product is impossible or how there will be issues will all CE at some point somewhere? What we should expect is Apple to continually work to lower the percentage of issues and to continue to offer a great policy if their are any.



    I think it depends on how many issues there actually are. One of the problems with the internet is that it can allow a minor problem to get blown way out of proportion, especially with a technology release which early on will sell to tech savvy people who are big internet users.



    It comes down to percentages. If say it's 0.1% of the devices that sold that have this wifi problem, then Solipsism is right, realistically there are going to be problems due to the impossibility of testing each individual component.



    If it's say 5% of devices with the issue, Greg is right, Apple didn't test enough and were obviously content to let users find their bugs.



    When all is said and done however, it all comes down to cost. I'm sure Apple would love a 0% return rate on the warranty, but that probably would mean testing all components individually, and costs would go through the roof. There is a happy medium to be struck.
  • Reply 56 of 164
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by greg30127 View Post


    I suppose I'll spell it out for you...



    I don't suggest they open every box. I'm saying if there is a design flaw in this device that causes it to not work as well as it could/should, then the device functionality/design should have been tested before it was produced, boxed, and shipped to stores, smart-ass.



    1) Actually, I'm the one that spelling it out for you. As I clearly pointed out there is no way that they can test every single shipping product without using the steps I mentioned, which is the only way to ensure that there will no CE issues. (in fact, every that isn't completely accurate as some issues don't occur right away).



    2) How do you know it's a design flaw and where was it suggested that a few people experiencing WiFi issues makes it a design flaw?



    3) A design flaw is one of the reasons they do testing. These are usually vetted early on because, well, it's part of the design that is flawed.



    4) Your "should have been tested" comment is now claiming that any CE with issues is proof that they didn't do any testing is now beyond asinine. Of course they test the hell out of these products but that doesn't mean there won't be some with issues. Unrealistic expectations!
  • Reply 57 of 164
    I really, really appreciate all of you with the inside info on Apple R&D and product testing.



    It would be foolish to just "assume" that Apple does not test product before launch. Thank you so much for your valuable inside information and input to this thread.



    BTW, my 64GB iPad connects flawlessly with my AirPort Extreme base at home and with our ancient Linksys G router here at work. This really surprises me since the iPad was not tested by Apple and according to those expert posters in this thread that my iPad is a piece of junk.



    Excuse me while I box my iPad for return. Yeah, right.
  • Reply 58 of 164
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by PaulMJohnson View Post


    I think it depends on how many issues there actually are. One of the problems with the internet is that it can allow a minor problem to get blown way out of proportion, especially with a technology release which early on will sell to tech savvy people who are big internet users.



    Some issues can be one of the thousands of components Apple has to buy for the device. Another can be the assembly quality of the factory. Another can be drivers. Yet another can SW. Those are just the big ones.



    Quote:

    It comes down to percentages. If say it's 0.1% of the devices that sold that have this wifi problem, then Solipsism is right, realistically there are going to be problems due to the impossibility of testing each individual component.



    It's more than just percentages. If say, the first iPhone had 0.10% issue rate, but the 3GS had a 0.05% issue rate. Apple had reduced the percentages of issues through tighter controls but the number of units sold makes the total number with issue greater than the original iPhone.



    And that is without accounting for the internet acting like a exponentially growing echo chamber of negative press.
  • Reply 59 of 164
    rob55rob55 Posts: 1,291member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    Yes, it is absolutely asinine and unrealistic to expect that every single component built in every single factory along every single point of the process be tested by Apple before it touches your greasy hands. There is also a possibility of the shipment being jostled so hard that it caused issues so your suggesting that every single Apple product be tested means that Apple should open up every single box right before it touches your hands and test it thoroughly before giving it to you. You honestly can't see how testing every single product is impossible or how there will be issues will all CE at some point somewhere? What we should expect is Apple to continually work to lower the percentage of issues and to continue to offer a great policy if their are any.



    Not contradicting you here, but just wanted to comment that Bang & Olufsen actually claims to test each and every unit that leaves their factory (or at least they used to anyway). However, when they charge $5,000 for a CD changer, you have to ask yourself if it's really worth it.
  • Reply 60 of 164
    stevejrstevejr Posts: 11member
    can't blame at&t for this one..
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