Apple planning standalone digital newsstand app for iPad - report

Posted:
in iPad edited January 2014
Apple is rumored to be creating a new digital storefront for newspapers and magazines that, like iBooks does for print books, will serve as a standalone iPad app for purchasing repurposed print content.



The new store, according to Bloomberg, will be separate from the established App Store and iBooks applications. The product is said to be in the early planning stages, as negotiations with major content providers are reportedly ongoing.



"Apple?s effort is aimed at luring more consumers to the iPad and helping publishers sell subscriptions, rather than single issues," the report said. "The main hang-ups between Apple and publishers including Time Warner Inc., Conde Nast, Hearst Corp. and News Corp. are who controls data about users and how to split subscription revenue, the people said. Pricing for subscriptions also hasn?t been worked out."



People involved in the discussions reportedly said the digital newsstand could open as soon as in a few months, or the talks could fall apart altogether. It was also suggested that Apple could wait until it launches its next-generation iPad in early 2011 before unveiling the new store.



The plans are said to be part of Apple's ongoing talks with print publishers who want to offer subscription plans for customers to access content from the iPad. This week, it was reported that Apple has agreed to allow an opt-in function which would let subscribers share their personal information with publications. The print business relies on demographic information to share data with advertisers.



Te new application will reportedly "make it easier and cheaper to create digital versions of magazines and newspapers, with extras such as high-resolution videos integrated with stories." The storefront will aim to simplify the process, in order to attract publishers.



Before the iPad was released earlier this year, publishers and Apple were said to have struggled to reach a deal, as Apple was reluctant to share consumer data beyond sales volume. But advertisers and publishers consider demographic data to be the "most valuable asset."
«134

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 72
    As with so many other subscription services on the iPad, the price must be right for the service to be a success and worthwhile to the consumer.
  • Reply 2 of 72
    Perfect timing. I mean it's only been 9 months and because I got tired of waiting I bought 4 subscriptions through Zinio.
  • Reply 3 of 72
    As long as it not called "Newsstand" then I welcome it. That double "S" looks messy.
  • Reply 4 of 72
    Hopefully this gets worked out, although I wouldn't count on it. Then again who would ever think that CD's would be old technology.
  • Reply 5 of 72
    sandausandau Posts: 1,230member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Joe hs View Post


    As long as it not called "Newsstand" then I welcome it. That double "S" looks messy.



    Newsrack. Buying out the app that currently owns the name.



    [insert bs here]
  • Reply 6 of 72
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Joe hs View Post


    As long as it not called "Newsstand" then I welcome it. That double "S" looks messy.



    It'll be called iNews.
  • Reply 7 of 72
    Apple will introduce many more stores...





    Music Store \t\t\t\t(Buy music and music videos)

    Movie and TV Show Store \t(Buy/Rent Movies, TV Shows, Free podcasts and University Classes)

    Book Store \t\t\t\t(Buy Books)

    Magazine + Newspaper store \t(Subscribe to news papers and magazines)

    TV Broadcast Store \t\t(Subscribe to TV Channels packages)

    Training Store\t\t\t(Enroll in training classes for credits and degrees)

    iOS Application store\t\t(Buy iOS applications for various devices)

    Advertising store\t\t\t(Buy iAD advertising)

    MobileMe store\t\t\t(Buy various MobileMe Services)





    Time will tell.
  • Reply 8 of 72
    wigginwiggin Posts: 2,265member
    I would love to get rid of the stack of printed magazines on my coffee table, and this could be the thing that gets me to jump on the bandwagon. But it's got to cost no more than the printed subscription price (ie, not news stand price) and ideally I'd be able to print. And I can't imagine the publishers could make a valid argument to disallow that...they'd make an argument, but it wouldn't be valid because I already get a printed copy that I can do all kinds of things with that I wouldn't be able to do with an electronic copy...all of them perfectly legal and within my rights.
  • Reply 9 of 72
    It had to happen sometime. Having a bunch of separate apps for newspaper/magazine-like content is extremely annoying, plus the fact that there's no consistency between how apps are controlled.



    But of course, media companies should be careful throwing all their eggs in one basket. The music companies are ruled by Apple, and no other industry wants to lose control to just one player.
  • Reply 10 of 72
    I wouldn't be surprised but if they are just now getting started we could be two years out from seeing it released. I guess the idea is to get everything ready for iPad 2 but I think it is going to take a little while for print publishers to accept any Apple terms for subscriptions. Apple had a hard enough time with iBooks and it lacks content compared to Kindle and Nook.



    I am also annoyed a little about this. Why does Apple need to make so many store fronts? Is it the Apple "simple" way or is there something more to it? Do they want to be more organised? I mean currently discovery is terrible inside iTunes, iBooks, and the App Store. Maybe they want more stores fronts to hide the fact that they can't figure out how to make discovering new things "simple" on mobile devices outside of using search and knowing what you are looking for. Because the top lists, featured items, and categories isn't quite cutting it anymore. It is better than what Android offers but not by much.
  • Reply 11 of 72
    mactelmactel Posts: 1,275member
    iBook, iNews, do iCare? iSuppose so if iFavored the iPad over physical paper subscriptions. The "i" naming scheme is getting tiresome. \
  • Reply 12 of 72
    iRag seems fit, guess it's unlikely.
  • Reply 13 of 72
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MacTel View Post


    iBook, iNews, do iCare? iSuppose so if iFavored the iPad over physical paper subscriptions. The "i" naming scheme is getting tiresome. \



    iDiot -- sorry, couldn't resist - only kidding.
  • Reply 14 of 72
    drdoppiodrdoppio Posts: 1,132member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ThinkTiM View Post


    iDiot -- sorry, couldn't resist - only kidding.



    Revealing the meaning of the "i" ain't no joke...
  • Reply 15 of 72
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dagamer34 View Post


    media companies should be careful throwing all their eggs in one basket. The music companies are ruled by Apple, and no other industry wants to lose control to just one player



    I'm sorry, what? Apple is just a store like any other, take the other grossly large stores such as Tesco in the UK or Walmart in the US. No-one would say that music companies or publishers should be concerned about selling their wares through them. They make business decisions, that's all, and if they can save money on printing and distribution including Apple's cut, they'll do it. If not, they won't. Simple as. There's no need to spread bull FUD.



    Pesonally, I would like to see single issues, and both magazines and iBooks DRM-free. Maybe if you can send it to a friend, they can digitally crinkle the pages a little, and you can't read yours til they "give it back". That'd be a laugh.
  • Reply 16 of 72
    kolchakkolchak Posts: 1,398member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bdkennedy1 View Post


    Perfect timing. I mean it's only been 9 months and because I got tired of waiting I bought 4 subscriptions through Zinio.



    Indeed. Zinio is probably a little scared right now. But just a little. If this is just for iOS devices, then Zinio's ability to be read on iOS, Mac and PC will be its advantage.
  • Reply 17 of 72
    What the publishers won't say is that their costs are completely paid by advertising. The magazines give their subscription income to companies like EBSCO because of this. Any income they get from apple is gravy. Don't think that Apple is taking advantage of them. Like many others they love to make someone else the bad guy.
  • Reply 18 of 72
    How does this differ from any magazine subscription model?



    Sound like Apple just want to put an i in front of another word and call it innovative?



    Where is Time Magazine, Golf Digest etc and how and why is this new News Rag model any different from what they already haven't accomplished.



    iDon't want 50 apps for what "I" can get for free right now on the internet.



    i guess I just read it differently.
  • Reply 19 of 72
    asciiascii Posts: 5,941member
    This is a good idea. The model where the publishers make their own apps has had very mixed results. I guess they're publishers not programmers.
  • Reply 20 of 72
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TimmyDax View Post


    I'm sorry, what? Apple is just a store like any other, take the other grossly large stores such as Tesco in the UK or Walmart in the US. No-one would say that music companies or publishers should be concerned about selling their wares through them. They make business decisions, that's all, and if they can save money on printing and distribution including Apple's cut, they'll do it. If not, they won't. Simple as. There's no need to spread bull FUD.



    Pesonally, I would like to see single issues, and both magazines and iBooks DRM-free. Maybe if you can send it to a friend, they can digitally crinkle the pages a little, and you can't read yours til they "give it back". That'd be a laugh.





    BS, Apple screwed the music industry and the movie and publishing industry have learned never to give 1 company that much power again.



    Apple to the Movie or Publishing industry is just another WalMart to sell their widgets.
Sign In or Register to comment.