Apple's relaxing of App Store rules has 'muted' effect on Adobe

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2014
Apple's decision to allow intermediary tools to port software from formats like Flash to the iPhone did not have a significant effect on sales of Adobe products, the company's CEO said this week.



Chief Executive Shantanu Narayen took part in his company's quarterly earnings call on Tuesday, in which he was asked about Apple's decision to allow third-party development tools to port applications to the iPhone. That meant software created with Adobe's own Flash-to-iPhone compiler became acceptable on the App Store.



Narayen said that the day Apple announced the change, a number of applications created with Adobe's Flash-to-iPhone compiler were approved, though he said the immediate effect on demand for Adobe Creative products was not significant.



"In the short run, I would say the impact was muted," he said.



But Narayen said he believes Adobe's tools give developers the opportunity to repurpose their applications and content for multiple formats and devices, allowing them to make their products available on a range of platforms, including Apple's wildly successful iOS mobile operating system.



The chief executive also said his company has talked with many content publishers who are concerned about making their content available on a range of devices, which he referred to as the "multi-screen problem." He said he believes Adobe's tools help to address that problem.



"Every publisher we talk to wants us to continue to help them author content and repurpose it across multiple devices," he said.



On Tuesday, Adobe announced that its net income for the third quarter was up 69 percent, but the company also gave an outlook for the fourth quarter that fell short of analyst expectations. Narayen said his company was taking a "cautious" view of the coming quarter, because back-to-school sales in the U.S. have been weaker than anticipated.



Narayen and Apple co-founder Steve Jobs exchanged a public war of words earlier this year, after Jobs published a letter in which he said Flash is the No. 1 cause of crashes on the Mac. Narayen fired back, and said that any issues are the fault of "the Apple operating system."



Adobe's CEO also contrasted his own company with Apple, saying the two corporations have different views of the world. He suggested that Apple has a "closed" view, while Adobe is pushing for "multi-platform."
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 77
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    "Every publisher we talk to wants us to continue to help them author content and repurpose it across multiple devices," he said.



    Adobe's CEO also contrasted his own company with Apple, saying the two corporations have different views of the world. He suggested that Apple has a "closed" view, while Adobe is pushing for "multi-platform."





    That all makes perfect sense. Apple wants lock-in, but nobody else does.
  • Reply 2 of 77
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Newtron View Post


    That all makes perfect sense. Apple wants lock-in, but nobody else does.



    Apple wants quality but no one else does. See, I can do it too.



    Apple doesn't deserve much defense in my eyes as of late (Steve is getting more egotistical as he gets older), but Adobe certainly no better than Apple. They have a horrible history of monopolizing & closing their market. They snatch up any rising challengers & then disband them, they are certainly not deserving of a pat on the back for the way they've mucked up media content on the web. Sooner we can free the web from their greedy paws the better.
  • Reply 3 of 77
    All this flash thing looks so much as the antennagate problem.



    I agree with Jobs when he says flash days are over. I hate the damn thing. I only use it to watch videos that are not in h.264, and that is it. Everytime I enable the thing my overall web experience is SO crappy.



    As of late, a lot of people started talking about Flash as a serious platform for development, but everybody with some insight knows it is not, thus you don't have any quality high performance flash application out there. Facebook brought a lot of games and I wonder how many people complain about it just due to that.



    If Flash doesn't generate a binary for the iOS platform I particularly don't care, because as said before "it is a substandard" product.
  • Reply 4 of 77
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by igorleandro View Post


    If Flash doesn't generate a binary for the iOS platform I particularly don't care, because as said before "it is a substandard" product.



    How specifically does the format of the object code define the user interface?
  • Reply 5 of 77
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    Adobe's CEO also contrasted his own company with Apple, saying the two corporations have different views of the world. He suggested that Apple has a "closed" view, while Adobe is pushing for "multi-platform."



    Nothing short of a complete reversal of truth. You got to love adobe these days...
  • Reply 6 of 77
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Newtron View Post


    That all makes perfect sense. Apple wants lock-in, but nobody else does.



    Here you are again Newtron, spewing your BS. Apple wants the consumer to have a great experience. This has nothing to do with lock-in. It has a lot to do with flash being old tech crapware that doesn't work on mobile devices. Your ignorant rants are really tiresome. Who are you shilling for? Apple has opened its app store to programs like Netflix, Kindle ebooks, Pandora, and many other "competing" products so your idiotic claim of lock-in holds no truth. You need to improve your education.
  • Reply 7 of 77
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by igorleandro View Post


    ... I particularly don't care, because as said before "it is a substandard" product.



    No, it is a "standard" product that comes preinstalled on every desktop, laptop and notebook sold in the entire world. You just don't like it.
  • Reply 8 of 77
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Newtron View Post


    That all makes perfect sense. Apple wants lock-in, but nobody else does.



    Not really true. Most companies would LOVE to have lock-in. M$ puts huge amounts of effort into achieving lock-in, and for many years they were very successful with it.



    But in the last few years, Apple has been pushing it to a new extreme. And it's truly infuriating.



    I've been using Apple products since the Apple II+, which was a beautifully open computer. They even included the schematic for the main logic board in the documentation that came with the machine. I've been with Apple through all their stupid decisions, the worst of which being the throwing away of control of the personal computer market in the early '80s. I was thrilled when Apple started doing well in the early 2000s. And then there's the iPhone.



    And the iPhone is a good product - but it should be criminal to lock up a device to the extent Apple has with the iPhone. I shouldn't have to do a procedure called "jailbreaking" just so I can run software on a device which is MY PROPERTY without approval from Apple. It should be the default that I can run whatever I want on MY device.



    So this arbitrary rule change is really not a step forward. Apple shouldn't be able to make rules like this in the first place.



    And no, I'm not suggesting that they be forced to sell everything anybody writes in their app store. I'm saying that it should be illegal to keep someone else from setting up an alternative app store.
  • Reply 9 of 77
    Good thing there's the ignore list for people like Newtron... whatever happened to TeckStud anyway? Did he suddenly morph into Newtron?



    IMHO, DarkVader, I don't think its a bad thing that Apple has locked up the iPhone. If you don't want to use it because you're not comfortable with their practices, don't buy it. It's that simple. But on the subject of alternative app stores, there's a real problem with authentication and security. Who's to say that someone won't set up an app store that can then have some malware slip through the review process and we're back to Windows security on mobile. Except it's worse, because we don't want antivirus hogging up the CPU on our mobiles and we have extremely sensitive information like contacts and bank info stored on our phones nowadays. And I don't think anyone would trust users to be better at managing security on their phones than on their PCs or Macs.



    I see it as a tradeoff. You can either have more security or more openness. I chose security. It's your choice, so if you want more openness, choose Android. Otherwise, stop complaining because that's the only way the system would work, with Apple as the gatekeeper, so as to potentially revoke certificates for apps to head off any potential security holes in bad apps. Certainly prevents malware writers from trying to submit apps in the app store, unlike Android Market.



    Jailbreaking breaks a lot of those security measures, so you're leaving yourself open to attack if you were to download a bad app. Of course, you're assuming all apps on Cydia are good (and they have been so far, but who knows how long that will last). Making the situation worse is the OpenSSH and default root password debacle.



    You'll certainly have the freedom to run malware as well as whatever you want on your iPhone if Apple followed your advice to the T.
  • Reply 10 of 77
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bartfat View Post


    Good thing there's the ignore list for people like Newtron... whatever happened to TeckStud anyway? Did he suddenly morph into Newtron?



    Almost certainly, Newtron is tekstud.



    Blackintosh is probably iGenius or MacTripper.



    And, who know how many of them are posting under multiple aliases.



    The troll merry-go-round never comes to a stop here at AI.
  • Reply 11 of 77
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hezetation View Post


    Apple wants quality but no one else does. See, I can do it too.



    Apple doesn't deserve much defense in my eyes as of late (Steve is getting more egotistical as he gets older), but Adobe certainly no better than Apple. They have a horrible history of monopolizing & closing their market. They snatch up any rising challengers & then disband them, they are certainly not deserving of a pat on the back for the way they've mucked up media content on the web. Sooner we can free the web from their greedy paws the better.



    Yeah, I was much too broad. I'll backpedal to firmer ground:



    Apple wants lock-in, but many developers sure as hell don't.



    And the average joe doesn't know and doesn't care.
  • Reply 12 of 77
    quinneyquinney Posts: 2,526member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post




    Narayen said that the day Apple announced the change, a number of applications created with Adobe's Flash-to-iPhone compiler were approved, though he said the immediate effect on demand for Adobe Creative products was not significant.



    "In the short run, I would say the impact was muted," he said.




    The impact of the earnings call on ADBE sure hasn't been muted though. Down almost 20%.
  • Reply 13 of 77
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DarkVader View Post




    I'm saying that it should be illegal to keep someone else from setting up an alternative app store.



    I don't know about illegal. But I would love to be able to get apps for my iPhone on download.cnet .com or at any of the other usual stores like Handango.



    Apple runs a nice store, especially for some types of people. But prohibiting the wares of any other store is - indescribable to me.
  • Reply 14 of 77
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bartfat View Post




    Apple has locked up the iPhone. ...

    don't buy it. It's that simple. ...

    problem with authentication and security. ...

    have some malware slip through ...

    Windows security on mobile. ...

    Except it's worse, ...

    antivirus hogging up the CPU ...

    we have extremely sensitive information...

    I don't think anyone would trust users...

    You can either have more security or more openness. ...

    I chose security. ...

    Apple as the gatekeeper, ...

    potentially revoke certificates for apps ...

    potential security holes...

    bad apps. ...

    prevents malware writers ...

    Jailbreaking breaks ...

    leaving yourself open to attack...

    a bad app. ...

    you're assuming all apps ...

    Making the situation worse ...

    default root password debacle...

    freedom to run malware ...

    ...

    ...





    All except FUD <deleted>.



    I disagree with much of what is left.
  • Reply 15 of 77
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    Narayen and Apple co-founder Steve Jobs exchanged a public war of words earlier this year, after Jobs published a letter in which he said Flash is the No. 1 cause of crashes on the Mac. Narayen fired back, and said that any issues are the fault of "the Apple operating system."



    "Flash Player has stopped working" is certainly the most frequent cause of crashes for me on both Mac and Windows. The sooner it's dead and buried the better.
  • Reply 16 of 77
    onhkaonhka Posts: 1,025member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DarkVader View Post


    And the iPhone is a good product - but it should be criminal to lock up a device to the extent Apple has with the iPhone. I shouldn't have to do a procedure called "jailbreaking" just so I can run software on a device which is MY PROPERTY without approval from Apple. It should be the default that I can run whatever I want on MY device.



    So this arbitrary rule change is really not a step forward. Apple shouldn't be able to make rules like this in the first place.



    And no, I'm not suggesting that they be forced to sell everything anybody writes in their app store. I'm saying that it should be illegal to keep someone else from setting up an alternative app store.



    Apple, like Honda, Ford, GM, SONY, and just about every other company does not stop you from altering YOUR PROPERTY. You have every right to do so. However, if you decide to do so, there isn't a company or service in the world that is obligated to service and support your changes.



    If I decide to install high-performance Holley carbs in my Lexus, I don't expect Toyota to stock, sell, service or support them. Or for sure, honor my warranty. BTW, there is no difference modifying my car or iPhone. They are still forms of "jailbreaking."



    And there are alternatives to Apples iTune Store. Where does it say that it is illegal to keep someone else from setting up an alternative app store or you need Apple's approval to run software on a device which is YOUR PROPERTY?
  • Reply 17 of 77
    newbeenewbee Posts: 2,055member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DarkVader View Post


    And the iPhone is a good product - but it should be criminal to lock up a device to the extent Apple has with the iPhone. I shouldn't have to do a procedure called "jailbreaking" just so I can run software on a device which is MY PROPERTY without approval from Apple. It should be the default that I can run whatever I want on MY device.



    I'm saying that it should be illegal to keep someone else from setting up an alternative app store.







    I'm not trying to jump on you for having an opinion that I don't happen to agree with, but ... two points: One: I still don't understand why a lot of people don't seem to understand Apple's stance on the "walled garden" approach. .... The wall is there, not to keep you in .... but to keep the bad guys and their crap out! Do you have an open door policy on your home? ... obviously not, because in this day and age it would not make any sense. Now if you want to have that policy, that would be your choice ... go for it.



    The main reason for the popularity of Apple is the "user experience of their product". There can be no debating that fact. That same user experience is a direct result of the Apple control over the integration of hardware and software, since they design both.



    If, as an "experienced computer user" you want to expand the abilities of your device in a way that Apple thinks, either rightly or wrongly, would lessen the user experience on a device that still represents Apple ..... you can do that by jailbreaking. That is your right. What is not your right is to force Apple to follow your "recommendations" as to what a user experience" should be for all of us who may not agree with you.



    Two: There is no law preventing anyone from opening up an alternative app store as, indeed, there are several in existence already .... and the fact that there already over 200,000 apps for sale that were not designed by Apple should be proof enough that Apple is not preventing that, as well.
  • Reply 18 of 77
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Newtron;


    That all makes perfect sense. Apple wants lock-in, but nobody else does.



    Interesting, I wonder how many non-Adobe plugins and software can author and play back Flash 10 AS3 files. Do you know of any?



    Also, I would like to ask why since several days ago you haven't replied to any of my posts even though I ask a legitimate question, such as the Flash one above.
  • Reply 19 of 77
    newbeenewbee Posts: 2,055member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Newtron View Post


    I don't know about illegal. But I would love to be able to get apps for my iPhone on download.cnet .com or at any of the other usual stores like Handango.



    Apple runs a nice store, especially for some types of people. But prohibiting the wares of any other store is - indescribable to me.





    Over 200,000 apps ... not designed by Apple .... is prohibitive???? .... not in my book it isn't.

    Tell me, do you expect other "stores" to sell the wares of all their competitors. I think not. So why should Apple?
  • Reply 20 of 77
    newbeenewbee Posts: 2,055member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Newtron View Post


    I disagree with much of what is left.



    Which is your right .... as is my right to disagree with you much of the time.
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