ITC rules HTC violating two of Apple's iPhone-related patents

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 82
    robotonerobotone Posts: 16member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


    2012: two Apple products MIGHT be 4G. No others will.



    Nokia has nearly half of all the 4G/LTE IP and didn't need to bid for the Nortels, so I think they may have something to say about that.
  • Reply 42 of 82
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,388member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by RoboTone View Post


    Nokia has nearly half of all the 4G/LTE IP and didn't need to bid for the Nortels, so I think they may have something to say about that.



    Say about what? Apple sells two products that will be upgraded to LTE. Their other products don't have anything to do with cellular telephony. My response had nothing to do with Nokia or anything they might think they 'have to say'.
  • Reply 43 of 82
    robotonerobotone Posts: 16member
    Oops, You said no others and I thought you were inferring out right exclusivity, rather than just apples products..

  • Reply 44 of 82
    tbelltbell Posts: 3,146member
    Nokia added those to a second lawsuit filed much later, which should tell you that wasn't the main grievance. It was the lawyers trying to up the game.



    I read the original Nokia complaint and Apple's response. Nokia's initial grievance was strictly the standard body held patents. Apple always knew it was going to pay for those. The issue always was going to come down to how much Apple was going to have to pay.



    The settlement certainly covered the second lawsuit that did involve other Nokia patents. However, I doubt Apple is paying any money for the licensing of those Nokia's patents. Apple publicly stated it licensed Nokia some of it's patents. My guess is the settlement of the smartphone claims by Nokia was resolved with a no money exchange for some of Apple's less important iPhone patents.





    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cloudgazer View Post


    Actually I believe Apple is also licensing some of Nokia's smartphone patents too, certainly Nokia's lawsuit against Apple wasn't all GSM patents. Hopefully the next results will shed some light on the royalties being paid.



  • Reply 45 of 82
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,388member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by RoboTone View Post


    Oops, You said no others and I thought you were inferring out right exclusivity, rather than just apples products..





    Ah, I get it. Though it'd be interesting if Nokia refused to let anyone use LTE.
  • Reply 46 of 82
    robotonerobotone Posts: 16member
    That would probably finish nokia off..
  • Reply 47 of 82
    prof. peabodyprof. peabody Posts: 2,860member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Zaim2 View Post


    So it's basically just Apple browbeating HTC with patents necessary for the creation of any modern competitive OS, not anything specific to iOS innovation. Well within their rights, but it's a bit too Microsoft-esque for me to get behind.



    Bull.



    Try reading more than just the title of the patent next time. These patents represent Apple inventions and are between 12 to 15 years old. Apple did it first, they patented it, and they deserve those patents in every way.



    See that's the way patents work. If you think of something *first* you get to claim that idea as your own.



    What's obvious *now* wasn't obvious when they were patented or someone else would have done it wouldn't they?
  • Reply 48 of 82
    prof. peabodyprof. peabody Posts: 2,860member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


    Ah, I get it. Though it'd be interesting if Nokia refused to let anyone use LTE.



    Except that would be classic "restraint of trade." Never happen.
  • Reply 49 of 82
    ecphorizerecphorizer Posts: 533member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Radjin View Post


    Or maybe, each maker will be innovative and make their own OS and actually not be an Android clone.



    Oh boy - just like the 70s when we had CP/M, Apple, Commodore, TRS-80, Compucolor, the S-100 boxes, etc, each with their own OS (though CP/M came closest to being multi-hardware; heck it was even on Apple 2's).
  • Reply 50 of 82
    cloudgazercloudgazer Posts: 2,161member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TBell View Post


    The settlement certainly covered the second lawsuit that did involve other Nokia patents. However, I doubt Apple is paying any money for the licensing of those Nokia's patents. Apple publicly stated it licensed Nokia some of it's patents. My guess is the settlement of the smartphone claims by Nokia was resolved with a no money exchange for some of Apple's less important iPhone patents.



    Sure, most likely the whole thing just ended up with an agreement over GSM royalties, but still the fact is that we know very little about the settlement. It would be quite astonishing if Nokia didn't have at least a few significant smartphone patents, I guess we'll have to see if they decide to go after an Android maker with them.
  • Reply 51 of 82
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,388member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ecphorizer View Post


    Oh boy - just like the 70s when we had CP/M, Apple, Commodore, TRS-80, Compucolor, the S-100 boxes, etc, each with their own OS (though CP/M came closest to being multi-hardware; heck it was even on Apple 2's).



    So? These are mobile devices. We have file standards, but we don't necessarily need OS standards. Having the code written in the same language would be nice, though, for developer portability.



    We certainly don't need look-and-feel standards. Windows Phone 7 is the best thing Microsoft could have ever done in the mobile world.
  • Reply 52 of 82
    cloudgazercloudgazer Posts: 2,161member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post


    What's obvious *now* wasn't obvious when they were patented or someone else would have done it wouldn't they?



    Wow, conclusive proof that all patents are valid! Wonderfully pithily wrong.
  • Reply 53 of 82
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,697member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post


    Bull.



    Try reading more than just the title of the patent next time. These patents represent Apple inventions and are between 12 to 15 years old. Apple did it first, they patented it, and they deserve those patents in every way.



    See that's the way patents work. If you think of something *first* you get to claim that idea as your own.



    What's obvious *now* wasn't obvious when they were patented or someone else would have done it wouldn't they?





    Well said. Hey I admit my bias





    I came across this link (apologies if it's been linked already) that seem to take a non partisan look at this. http://fosspatents.blogspot.com/2011...gement-of.html
  • Reply 54 of 82
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    I can see how one can read these patent titles in the Summer of 2011 and think "Duh!".





    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


    You don't know that. No one knows that. And only two Apple products have any chance of having LTE at all.
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jd_in_sb View Post


    In 2012 Apple products will contain both 3G and 4G





    Yes, we can easily infer that in 2012 there will be non-LTE '3G' connectivity. Just look at the devices that have '3G' that have yet to drop '2G' support.
  • Reply 55 of 82
    fuwafuwafuwafuwa Posts: 163member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TheShepherd View Post


    HTC not Google



    No, Google is not device makers, thus is not affected by device related patents. Google just provide cash cows to sue in one organization, OHA.
  • Reply 56 of 82
    guch20guch20 Posts: 173member
    To the people gloating about this: None of us are patent lawyers or judges, and none of us really have any clue what any of this means in the long run, but let's just stop with the talk about Android being in trouble somehow. This isn't going to stop Android from spreading, and it's certainly not going to stop companies from using Android.



    Realistically, we can expect some kind of payment and/or cross-licensing deal to happen, and that will be the end of it. Android will continue to operate as a cheap, utilitarian, good-enough, wannabe rip-off of iOS, and Google will continue to rake in billions by selling the information they gather from people's texts, emails, searches, and map queries.



    This changes nothing.
  • Reply 57 of 82
    gwydiongwydion Posts: 1,083member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


    What European carriers have 4G networks (or plans for them within the next few years) at all?



    My post lacked a /sarcasm indicator



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by stelligent View Post


    For one thing, the new OS will include new languages, possibly including yours.









    Just tea ... sing ...



    Thanks, but I think most of them have Spanish or Catalan, which are my mother tongues, not English. So sorry for not speaking it correctly.
  • Reply 58 of 82
    jahonenjahonen Posts: 364member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


    What European carriers have 4G networks (or plans for them within the next few years) at all?



    Currently operational:

    - Tele 2 (Sweden)

    - Telenor (Norway + Sweden)

    - Telia (Norway + Sweden)

    - Sonera (Finland)

    - Vodafone (Germany)

    - EMT (Estonia)

    - Lithuania (don't remember operator)

    - Poland (Don't remember operator)



    Near future commitments:

    - Austria

    - Belgium

    - Croatia

    - France

    - Hungary

    - Ireland

    - Italy

    - Luxembourg

    - Netherlands

    - Portugal

    - Russia

    - Slovenia

    - Switzerland

    - UK



    At the moment though, LTE offers little improvement over HSPA+ in regards to bandwidth or delay. This will naturally change, but there is no real hurry in Europe to deploy LTE as the current service is in general, good. Voice call continuity and the lack of real mobile devices (except for some USB dongles) is the other issue that is not causing the operator's to hurry with LTE. The mass rollouts will happen in the next few years.



    These are the reasons that I don't see Apple or other phone vendors bringing out LTE voice capable handsets "real soon". LTE at the moment is for data. Seamless voice 3G<->LTE takes time to deploy properly and iron out the bugs.



    Regs, Jarkko
  • Reply 59 of 82
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


    What European carriers have 4G networks (or plans for them within the next few years) at all?



    All of them have plans, been planning for years
  • Reply 60 of 82
    d-ranged-range Posts: 396member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by stelligent View Post


    But don't forget HTC has an ace up its sleeve that it can use - it has acquired S3 Graphics, which has won the first round of judgement in suing Apple for infringement of its image compression patents.



    S3 Image compression technology is used everywhere, you can find it in any GPU (desktop or mobile) on the market today, and all the GPU manufacturers license it, including Imagination Technologies, who make the GPU's Apple uses. S3 does not have any patents that Apple would infringe on, if anyone would be infringing, it would be Imagination. If S3 sued Imagination for infringment, that would affect Android handset manufacturers just as well as Apple, since Imagination chips are used everywhere. S3 has no patents that pertain to anything directly related to image compression in iOS, unless S3 thinks they have patents covering JPEG and PNG, which would -again- mean almost the whole world infringes on them.
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