Nest Learning Thermostat reportedly taken off Apple Store shelves

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Comments

  • Reply 81 of 231
    isaidsoisaidso Posts: 750member


    Bottom line:


    Anybody who thinks that a home, no matter how large or how many different zones can't be more effectively and economically heated and cooled by a intercommunicating network of computers than it can from a system of thermometers and clock timers essential originating from the 1930s, doesn't have a clue.


    Nest can pay for itself in months; it's all gravy ($) after that.  Wish I had one.

  • Reply 82 of 231
    chris_cachris_ca Posts: 2,543member
    isaidso wrote: »
    Bottom line:
    Anybody who thinks that a home, no matter how large or how many different zones can't be more effectively and economically heated and cooled by a intercommunicating network of computers than it can from a system of thermometers and clock timers essential originating from the 1930s, doesn't have a clue.
    Nest doesn't "intercommunicate" with anything. It runs by itself.
    You can control it (if you wish) and read the settings with iOS but the idea is to plug it in and forget about it.
  • Reply 83 of 231


    spot on! Seems like it's ahead of it's time. Perhaps he should be targeting architects, homebuilders, HVAC manufactures etc., as well.

  • Reply 84 of 231
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    chris_ca wrote: »
    Nest doesn't "intercommunicate" with anything. It runs by itself.
    You can control it (if you wish) and read the settings with iOS but the idea is to plug it in and forget about it.

    I'm not sure I follow since you've acknowledged that you can intercommunication with it over WiFi via an iOS capable device. But even excluding that you still have to interact with it to get the software to understand your base settings. It will learn your routine which is helped along by its sensors but initial nudging seems to be required for proper calibration. On top of that you can have multiple Nest devices that can directly communication with each other, like in a multi-zone home.

    PS: After first hearing about Nest I was surprised they didn't also have inexpensive Nest units that contained only sensors and WiFi that could be tied to a primary unit so it could map a home more accurately.
  • Reply 85 of 231
    chris_cachris_ca Posts: 2,543member
    It can communicate with another NEST but it will work just fine autonomously.

    You don't need and it doesn't use 'intercommunicating network of computers" to control everything.
    You can use wifi to set it but the smartphone/computer does not calculate everything. The NEST itself does it.
    Perhaps if it phoned "home" everyday with info and "home" did all the calculations and sent it back then it would be as isaidso saidso. ;)
    "no matter how large or how many different zones can't be more effectively and economically heated and cooled by a intercommunicating network of computers than it can from a system of thermometers and clock timers essential originating from the 1930s"
  • Reply 86 of 231
    island hermitisland hermit Posts: 6,217member


    Note to AI:


     


    Please write more articles about Microsoft Surface, Samsung lawsuits and Android on the weekends... people obviously need to vent. If this story can garner over 80 posts then think what one of the aforementioned stories could generate if posted on Saturday or Sunday.

     

  • Reply 87 of 231


    This is interesting.... a quick review and installation vid. :)


     


    http://reviews.cnet.com/appliances/nest-learning-thermostat/4505-17889_7-35179222.html

  • Reply 88 of 231
    toestoes Posts: 55member
    Didn't quote what I was responding to.
  • Reply 89 of 231
    bagmanbagman Posts: 349member


    Have used one since it first came out, with this suggestion:  If you live by yourself, the only feature you will use is the ability to control it from your phone/workPC.  I had to turn off the auto-learning feature, because it couldn't anticipate my erratic schedule in getting home and leaving, and I had to manually overide it almost daily. Had to go to timed programming (turning off the auto learning feature) which is equivalent to that of all modern electronic thermostats, which sell for under $100 at Home Depot/Lowes, etc.  Now I only use it to get the heat/air going just before arriving at home, so it justifies my $250 cost (at least it is worth it to me to pre-heat/cool my house).  The whole learning thing is a smokescreen, because it really can only work for fairly steady routines, and cannot anticipate erratic schedules, so if it really works, it is actually just like using daily timers on conventional thermostats.


     


    One other note; if you own pets, and need to check up on the house temperature, it may be worth it to have the wifi access. I tried out another electronic wifi thermostat, but the internet connection wasn't as smooth as it was with the Nest, and most require you have a hot-wire to run the wifi portion of the unit - not so the Nest, which has its own built-in battery and ability to charge it without having this additional wire.  This save a whole lot of money if you had to have an electrician run the other hot-wire; -- bottom line, it is more elegantly designed that any others just from an installation standpoint alone.


     


    Perhaps Apple knows something about the wifi standards that are only now being talked about to control other aspects of our homes, and the industry's interest in standardizing them.  That doesn't explain Apple taking it off the shelves, but it makes you wonder if Apple plans on taking the lead in pushing for industry-wide standards, as they have done in other areas.

  • Reply 90 of 231
    freediverxfreediverx Posts: 1,415member


    They weren't offering that for free at the time.

  • Reply 91 of 231
    isaidsoisaidso Posts: 750member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Chris_CA View Post



    It can communicate with another NEST but it will work just fine autonomously.

    You don't need and it doesn't use 'intercommunicating network of computers" to control everything.

    You can use wifi to set it but the smartphone/computer does not calculate everything. The NEST itself does it.

    Perhaps if it phoned "home" everyday with info and "home" did all the calculations and sent it back then it would be as isaidso saidso. image

    "no matter how large or how many different zones can't be more effectively and economically heated and cooled by a intercommunicating network of computers than it can from a system of thermometers and clock timers essential originating from the 1930s"


    @Chris_CA "You don't need and it doesn't use 'intercommunicating network of computers" to control everything."


    You're right, it doesn't; it "IS" an intercommunicating network of computers. That is what I meant.


    Does it have a CPU? Does it have a ROM? does it have an upgradeable OS? does it have networking between others of it's kind (and the internet?)


    It's a networkable computer. And it's capabilities are only in its infancy.


     


    edit: and most importantly; is it capable of learning?

  • Reply 92 of 231
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    isaidso wrote: »
    edit: and most importantly; is it capable of learning?

    "Am I a thermostat?"
  • Reply 93 of 231
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    "I cool, therefore I am (a thermostat)."

    Of course there'll be an existential crisis come winter when it has to learn how to heat.
  • Reply 94 of 231
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,471member
    solipsismx wrote: »
    "Am I a thermostat?"

    "Sorry Dave but I can't let you lower the temperature any more ..."
  • Reply 95 of 231

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post





    "Sorry Dave but I can't let you lower the temperature any more ..."


     


    LOL. Machine logic:


    Minimal utility costs when A/C not used.


    Humans want A/C.


    If no humans, then no A/C needed.


    Therefore, to minimize utility costs, all humans must be eliminated.

  • Reply 96 of 231
    sandorsandor Posts: 636member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Sensi View Post


    Well I love domotics but a $250 thermostat is just a ridiculous price to start with...



     


     


     


    true.


     


    i got a $29 programmable thermostat at Home Depot that can follow my daily schedule as well. the price of the nest is just ridiculous. 


     


     


     


    ***EDIT***


     


    sorry, $24.99


     


    http://www.homedepot.com/Building-Materials-Heating-Venting-Cooling-Thermostats/h_d1/N-asjhZ5yc1v/R-202024248/h_d2/ProductDisplay?catalogId=10053&langId=-1&storeId=10051


     


    it takes, literally, 60 seconds to run through and program wake/leave home/sleep for seven days. when i am home from work on vacation, i don't need my thermostat to learn about it, i can simply teach it in less time that it takes me to make my morning coffee. 


     


    Nest is fancy, but far too expensive for what it does. 

  • Reply 97 of 231
    dcgoodcgoo Posts: 258member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Chris_CA View Post





    Nest doesn't "intercommunicate" with anything. It runs by itself.

    You can control it (if you wish) and read the settings with iOS but the idea is to plug it in and forget about it.


     


    Actually it does.  It is aware of local outside weather conditions (temperature and humidity) which it pulls from some Internet source, and uses that to decide when just activating the blower might be advantageous. If you have multiple Nests installed, they are linked together for away and auto-away (although that is through a connection across nest.com, not locally).  They also maintain a connection to nest.com for usage reporting purposes, and updating firmware automatically.  A connection to the Internet is required for full functionality.  It will work without an Internet connection, but many of the features are compromised.

  • Reply 98 of 231
    charlitunacharlituna Posts: 7,217member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by sandor View Post


     


    Nest is fancy, but far too expensive for what it does. 



     


    It's a hard call to say something is too expensive if we don't know the cost of the pieces and the labor to build it. 


     


    As for the Nest itself, it's fantastic that you don't need something that fancy but some of us might such a thing useful. My job can have a day that was supposed to be 8 hours but goes to 12 while we are in the middle of our work. That $25 perfect thermostat of yours would be running up my heating or cooling bill for hours that I'm not home yet. So for me, the ability to override the controls while I'm late at work and the back when I leave set actually has use. 

  • Reply 99 of 231
    j1h15233j1h15233 Posts: 274member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by foljs View Post


     


    "I don't know how we ever lived without one,"


     


    Funny, this guy I met in Africa said the same about running water!



    If you're so worried about it, go to freaking Africa and give him some water douchebag.

  • Reply 100 of 231
    sandorsandor Posts: 636member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by charlituna View Post


     


    It's a hard call to say something is too expensive if we don't know the cost of the pieces and the labor to build it. 


     


    As for the Nest itself, it's fantastic that you don't need something that fancy but some of us might such a thing useful. My job can have a day that was supposed to be 8 hours but goes to 12 while we are in the middle of our work. That $25 perfect thermostat of yours would be running up my heating or cooling bill for hours that I'm not home yet. So for me, the ability to override the controls while I'm late at work and the back when I leave set actually has use. 



     


    so pay less than 1/2 the price of Nest, and get a wifi/web enabled thermostat:


     


    http://www.homedepot.com/Building-Materials-Heating-Venting-Cooling-Thermostats/h_d1/N-asjhZ5yc1vZ1z0yhrk/R-202352449/h_d2/ProductDisplay?catalogId=2&langId=-1&storeId=10051


     


    it is actually quite easy to call something expensive, regardless of the labour or materials costs. 


     


    when Nest's biggest energy savings advertising blip seems to be "Only 10% of programmable thermostats are programmed to save energy, but thanks to learning, 99% of Nests have schedules that reflect their owner's lives." it makes me think of VCRs blinking 12:00. Maybe I'm just not $225 lazy.

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