Nest Learning Thermostat reportedly taken off Apple Store shelves

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  • Reply 161 of 231

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by diplication View Post





    Try disconnecting the heating and fan wires - leaving the common, and cooling wires. If the a/c stops functioning, it was wired wrong. If the aux heat still runs and the a/c still functions, it might be a problem with your system. If the aux heat stops but a/c still functions, then definitely the thermostat is faulty.


     


    No.  The Nest failed. 

  • Reply 162 of 231
    massconn72massconn72 Posts: 162member


    I just knew there was a reason that my 5 year old Mac Pro running 24 hrs a day doing video was no good. It was just made so lousy!

  • Reply 163 of 231
    jragostajragosta Posts: 10,473member
    mstone wrote: »
    Actually the Colorado swamp cooler is the exact same technology used by many data centers including Apple's were by water is passed over coils as air is used to cause evaporative cooling.

    No, it's not. Not even close.

    Swamp cooler technology doesn't use coils at all - and it would certainly not be used in a data center since it adds too much moisture to the air. Data centers have traditional air conditioning systems, but sometimes cool the coils with water rather than air because of the greater heat transfer efficiency.

    Swamp coolers are completely unrelated. They are boxes placed on your roof which have pads that are sprayed continuously with water. A big fan pulls outside air through the pads and the water evaporates, cooling the air which is then pushed into the house. It's pure evaporative cooling.

    But feel free to show a data center which uses that technology.
  • Reply 164 of 231


    Hey Kasper.


     


    I broke this story last week on http://www . infiniteloopmobile . com. How about some link love buddy?


     


    http://www . infiniteloopmobile . com/2012/06/ apple-pulls-nest-thermostat-from-brick-and-mortar-stores-mysteries/


     


    David


     


    (break up links to edit out possible link spam)

  • Reply 165 of 231
    stevehsteveh Posts: 480member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by lightknight View Post


    You know, 30 years ago, it was impossible that  plastics could have any effect on human health. It was absurd to even suggest it. Where are we now? Same situation.



     


    Say what? More than 50 years ago it was well known that there were possible plastic-related health issues, depending on the plastic, environment, exposure levels, etc etc etc. An elementary-school student could easily find information about this sort of thing in the open literature if one were so inclined to look for it. I know I did.

  • Reply 166 of 231
    stevehsteveh Posts: 480member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by super8sean View Post



    Wow this dude is paranoid. Only the router gives off a wireless signal. Everything else receives it. You get more radiation per by going through the checkpoints at a airport.


    Ummm.


     


    WiFi is two-way communication. Everything in the local net is transmitting and receiving.

  • Reply 167 of 231
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,951member
    steveh wrote: »
    Ummm.

    WiFi is two-way communication. Everything in the local net is transmitting and receiving.

    Correct. Even if the data seems to only flow in one direction, signaling goes both directions.

    But I don't think it matters for health concerns. I don't think the fears are well-grounded in reality. The reports seem mixed at best, and there's nothing shown that this low of a power can harm. To break molecular bonds (for mutations) requires much higher energies/frequencies. And it's not enough power to heat people up noticeably.
  • Reply 168 of 231
    jhende7jhende7 Posts: 62member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mstone View Post


    Well it was just an example. I have no experience with the device so I simply asked a question. I my case, as stated earlier, my house is so well insulated and airtight I really don't need heat or A/C except on rare occasion, maybe a couple times a year for each at most and even then the temperature spread is so minimal I would consider my heating and cooling needs whim based as I really don't ever 'need' to used them. Just put on a sweat shirt or shorts as needed.



    Dude, I think the problem some people are having is that you are assuming everyone lives in a climate like you where temperatures are fairly stable.


     


    Try living in where I live (in Canada) where it can routinely get up to 40 degrees C (105 F) in the summer or -40 degrees C (-40 F) in the winter. Day to day you can have temperature swings of like 20-30 degrees C outside. Not saying I need a Nest to mange the indoor climate, but for 250 bucks it does a lot of work.

  • Reply 169 of 231
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,951member
    jhende7 wrote: »
    Dude, I think the problem some people are having is that you are assuming everyone lives in a climate like you where temperatures are fairly stable.

    Try living in where I live (in Canada) where it can routinely get up to 40 degrees C (105 F) in the summer or -40 degrees C (-40 F) in the winter. Day to day you can have temperature swings of like 20-30 degrees C outside. Not saying I need a Nest to mange the indoor climate, but for 250 bucks it does a lot of work.

    Did you conveniently ignore this line?:
    "I my case, as stated earlier, my house is so well insulated and airtight I really don't need heat or A/C except on rare occasion"

    You'd be surprised how much of a difference proper insulation and sealing can do.
  • Reply 170 of 231
    welshdogwelshdog Posts: 1,826member


    Press release announcing adoption of Nest by Reliant Energy.  Seems someone thinks Nest is a good idea.

  • Reply 171 of 231
    hkzhkz Posts: 190member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Slang4Art View Post


     









    1.


    of or relating to Draco, 7th-century Athenian statesman andlawmaker, or his code of laws, which prescribed death for almost every offence


     


    I like that you linked to your own fail.



     


    I like that you're just as ignorant as the original poster. Show me where in popular modern lexicon that Draconian is used to mean death for every offense. Everywhere it is used in modern lexicon is for the second definition on that page, not the first. The word has more than one meaning you moron. You obviously skipped over the parts of that page that didn't fit your argument like the last idiot.

  • Reply 172 of 231
    sandorsandor Posts: 639member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by WelshDog View Post


    Press release announcing adoption of Nest by Reliant Energy.  Seems someone thinks Nest is a good idea.



    or, more likely, a profitable idea.

  • Reply 173 of 231
    welshdogwelshdog Posts: 1,826member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by sandor View Post


    or, more likely, a profitable idea.



    Well after all, it is a manufactured product for sale.  It's kind of a given that there is profit to be made.


     


    Interestingly power companies these days want people to use less power and are looking for simple cost effective ways to to that.  Apparently even at $250 (or what ever the wholesale price is) Reliant feels it will help customers conserve.  if that works for Reliant then it probably works for those of us who buy it on our own.  

  • Reply 174 of 231
    docno42docno42 Posts: 3,709member
    Could it be related to the honeywell lawsuit?

    My Nest works fine - it's awesome!
  • Reply 175 of 231
    docno42docno42 Posts: 3,709member
    freediverx wrote: »
    Purchased a Nest thermostat but had to return it because I couldn't get it to work properly with my building's HVAC system.

    Perhaps the Nest isn't as widely compatible as originally thought

    You do realize it's targeted at home users, not people living in commercial buildings with commercial HVAC systems? How many thermostats at Lowes or Home Depot can you use?
    and Apple had to take it off the shelves after receiving complaints? I always wondered if the limited availability of the Nest enabled the company to keep complaints out of the public eye...

    Er, the limited initial availability is because initial demand overwhelmed their supply. Since they are in Lowes and on Amazon, I doubt they are limiting supply to "keep complaints out of the public eye" :rolleyes:

    Wow, I thought the wifi radiation guy was a nutter.... Mine works fine with my traditional natural gas/air conditioning system as well as my heatpump system on my second floor. For as hacked up and undocumented as HVAC wiring can be, I'm surprised there aren't MORE people complaining about NEST. The biggest complaints are from people who don't have 24V power to their thermostat. Luckily for me there were extra unused wires and it was relatively easy to get 24V to my thermostat locations. NEST does have a battery and it will charge when the fan runs to try to compensate for not having constant power. I applaud them for trying to be accommodating, but it doesn't work with every system and if you are in a really temperate climate where your system doesn't run enough I could see the battery never getting charged.

    Again, I'm astonished there aren't MORE complaints about them....
  • Reply 176 of 231
    docno42docno42 Posts: 3,709member
    This was one of the many reasons I've seen in reading reviews online from various sources why the Nest is an iffy purchase.  It seems to have some bugs (either with the device or the user themself) that need to be worked out despite its ease of install and use.

    The only "bugs" are in getting it working. If you aren't the least bit mechanically or electrically inclined, don't be a cheapskate - spring for the concierge installation service and you won't have any issues.

    99% of the problems I see people complain about are installation related. Heck, I had some issues with mine - mainly getting power up to it and figuring out that the original installer of my HVAC system was an idiot and didn't follow industry standard color code conventions. Once I corrected the wiring errors, activated power on an unused wire, the Nest installed easily and has worked flawlessly for four months now.

    Actually, better than flawlessly. It's prompted me to pay attention to the way I use my HVAC system and I've saved money. If I keep up with my current pace, the feed back it provides will probably get me a payback in less than a year. Because it's trivial to change the thermostat from my iPhone, I've been more aggressive about setting back and it adds up quickly!
  • Reply 177 of 231
    docno42docno42 Posts: 3,709member
    dbtinc wrote: »
    Sorry a $250 thermostat? No matter how "cool" it's still a programmable thermostat.

    And the iPhone is just another smartphone.

    It's not just a programmable thermostat, but a learning thermostat that has drop-dead simple Internet integration. That combo makes a HUGE difference. And yes, I am well on track for it repaying itself within a year. It replaced a seven day programable thermostat - but with the Nest I'm able to be far more aggressive than I ever was with that, mainly because of the iPhone access. I can turn it down remotely if I forget. And I know I can turn it on when I start to head for home, so I am far more aggressive in setting it back. Plus it gives you feedback on how you are doing. They took it to the next level with their recent energy report that helps keep my attention and focused on maximizing savings. I can see when I am doing well and when I'm not.

    And unlike the games on my iPhone, this game keeps real money in my pocket if I "win".

    So stay hung up on the initial price and don't consider total cost of ownership over the long haul - your loss. Of $$$ that is....
  • Reply 178 of 231
    docno42docno42 Posts: 3,709member
    welshdog wrote: »
    It also has some outside the box thinking as well.  The Airwave feature that extracts otherwise wasted cold energy from the condenser coils is pretty genius.

    And it just doesn't blindly do it, either. If the humidity in your home is high and that would cause unhealthy humidity levels, the AirWave feature automatically cuts out.

    It's that Apple-like attention to detail that sets Nest apart from any other thermostat or thermostat manufacturer.

    If Honeywell had the least bit of shame or pride they would be embarrassed that they have sat on their collective asses and essentially milked the thermostat market for as long as they have with damn little to show for it while having the gall to patent troll Nest...
    My wife and I have erratic, unpredictable schedules and the Nest deals with that beautifully.  It's particularly nice to turn on the AC a few minutes before I get home so the house is not 85 degrees. Plus it replaced a wireless programmable thermostat that cost more than $250 so the price argument people are making is weak.

    Yup - those with erratic schedules like me (I work from home on a non-consistent schedule) will probably see the greatest savings since the Nest is self-adapting to occupancy. And as for the derisive comments about price, after hearing for decades about the "Apple Tax" is it really that surprising that there are people who are too ignorant to look past the initial cost of an item and instead factor in the total cost of ownership of an item?
  • Reply 179 of 231
    docno42docno42 Posts: 3,709member
    solipsismx wrote: »
    PS: After first hearing about Nest I was surprised they didn't also have inexpensive Nest units that contained only sensors and WiFi that could be tied to a primary unit so it could map a home more accurately.

    Yup - but they still can come out with it. I've already asked :) The thing is upgradeable - it's already been upgraded at least once. The new airwave functionality works really, really well!
  • Reply 180 of 231
    docno42docno42 Posts: 3,709member
    bagman wrote: »
    The whole learning thing is a smokescreen, because it really can only work for fairly steady routines, and cannot anticipate erratic schedules, so if it really works, it is actually just like using daily timers on conventional thermostats.

    Actually that's not true. My schedule is erratic, but it still knows when I am not home and will set back automatically if I forget to. Sure, I still tweak it manually - but not as much as I thought I would due to my also having a pretty erratic schedule. Perhaps you just needed to give it some more time? If it gets it wrong, you can easily correct it and if it gets it wrong in that you aren't home, it will pick up on that within an hour or so. Similar to Tivo suggestions, I don't know why anyone would ever turn it off since there is very little downside to leaving it on, even if it's not able to get it perfect.
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