San Francisco to cease Mac purchases without EPEAT certification

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  • Reply 21 of 195
    poochpooch Posts: 768member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post


    A bunch of really sick people live in San Francisco. Isn't that the same city that banned happy meals a while ago? Those people are batshit insane. And they've also considered banning pets? Is that an actual American city or is it some little communist town run by radical, authoritarian, dictator wannabes? It's like a prison for freaks.


     


    As for San Fran banning Macs from being bought by city agencies, who cares? As the article said, Macs only make up a percent or two of their complete usage, so let 'em ban what they want. Apple doesn't need San Fran, and neither do I.





    i live in san francisco.  please enlighten me as to how i am sick?  or any of my friends for that matter? 


     


    and [only a] nobody calls it 'san fran'.

  • Reply 22 of 195
    apple ][apple ][ Posts: 8,743member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Crowley View Post


    image Angry much?  If you don't live there, what does it matter to you?


     


    Me, I think I'd like San Francisco a lot.



    I don't live there thankfully, though I did pass through there briefly once. I was there for business purposes and didn't have the time to see much of the city, and I doubt that I missed out on much.


     


    And San Francisco doesn't matter much to me obviously, I'm just commenting on this particular article, which has to with San Francisco and their banning of Macs.

  • Reply 23 of 195


    apple losing all gov't clients is likely a good thing. you can't be "cool" and be a part of big brother at the same time. 


     


    this is the best choice for apple to remain in the public eye as the quintessential hipster brand.

  • Reply 24 of 195
    apple ][apple ][ Posts: 8,743member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Pooch View Post




    i live in san francisco.  please enlighten me as to how i am sick?  or any of my friends for that matter? 


     


    and [only a] nobody calls it 'san fran'.



    I don't know about you personally, I'm referring to your politicians, and when I mean sick, I am referring to mental issues.

  • Reply 25 of 195
    rtm135rtm135 Posts: 310member


    What is this new port you speak of?  I couldn't find any information about it.


     


    Quote:

    Originally Posted by msimpson View Post


     


    The real reason is that Apple only supports Thunderbolt and USB ports and has not adopted the new GLBT universal access ports.


  • Reply 26 of 195
    isaidsoisaidso Posts: 750member


    f it.

  • Reply 27 of 195
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    danv2 wrote: »
    I work for the Federal Government, and as a rule the organization I work for (which will remain anonymous) can only buy 5% of its purchases as non-EPEAT compliant. Therefore, Apple has painted themselves into corner on government sales at the US Federal level. If either EPEAT or Apple cannot budge you will see a large backlash of data on this issue. I'm not saying either should change, but the plain fact is that Macs and other Apple mobile devices won't be looked to as a purchasable item for government and educational use.

    This is perhaps the largest mistake Apple could have made, politically speaking, with regards to government and education.

    I don't think Apple has ever had anywhere near 5% of government PC sales so I think they are safe on that front.

    iPhones and iPads are not required to be EPEAT certified, from what I understand so they are safe on that front.

    It's better that Apple push the envelop in designing their PCs to increase overall sales and profit, not to guarantee a couple extra potential sales in government, so they are safe on that front.
  • Reply 28 of 195

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by gbdoc View Post


    But what's the real deal? 1. Is Apple's new "design direction" simply ignoring environmental concerns (producing dirty but cute iStuff), 2. is the EPEAT certification somehow faulty (to which Apple objects), or 3. is something else going on?



     


     


    I'll pick 2. for $2000, Alex!


     


    If Apple helped to produce the standards then I think that Apple knows the limits of that standard and has moved forward faster than the standards rules. I couldn't say for sure and something tells me that it might be hard to investigate because the glues and processes that Apple uses may be ahead of the curve and not fully tested in the standards setting labs.


     


    I just can't see Apple saying to hell with the environment.

  • Reply 29 of 195
    apple ][apple ][ Posts: 8,743member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by rtm135 View Post


    What is this new port you speak of?  I couldn't find any information about it.


     



    In case you missed it, it was a joke. I found it funny.

  • Reply 30 of 195


    in an unrelated story, the City of San Francisco is deploying iPads to all of it's city officials.

     

  • Reply 31 of 195
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    agramonte wrote: »
    If you live in the USA you need San Francisco.

    Uh, for what?
  • Reply 32 of 195
    jragosta wrote: »
    It's really sad how we let idiots make decisions for us. Glue does not make the laptop any less recyclable - and Apple leads the industry (by far) in recyclability of its computers.

    Government bureaucracies are staffed by idiots? Who'da thunk it?
  • Reply 33 of 195
    danv2danv2 Posts: 29member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post





    I don't think Apple has ever had anywhere near 5% of government PC sales so I think they are safe on that front.

    iPhones and iPads are not required to be EPEAT certified, from what I understand so they are safe on that front.

    It's better that Apple push the envelop in designing their PCs to increase overall sales and profit, not to guarantee a couple extra potential sales in government, so they are safe on that front.


    They are 40% of the purchases and systems installed at the government organization I work for. This is a dangerous thing as we have become pretty reliant on them. I'm not kidding or joking.

  • Reply 34 of 195
    normmnormm Posts: 575member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by gbdoc View Post


    But what's the real deal? Is Apple's new "design direction" simply ignoring environmental concerns (producing dirty but cute iStuff), is the EPEAT certification somehow faulty (to which Apple objects), or is something else going on?



     


    Apple has an extremely good environment record and has a sophisticated recycling strategy for its products.  It was involved in drafting the EPEAT standard years ago, but manufacturing has evolved since then and the criterion of easy disassembly by end users no longer makes sense.  Presumably Apple has removed all its products from certification in order to bring the issue to a head, since its new products are no longer easy to disassemble by end users and hence, in this respect alone, no longer qualify for EPEAT certification.

  • Reply 35 of 195
    apple ][apple ][ Posts: 8,743member


    And what really pissed me off about San Francisco, is that they're supposed to be known as some progressive and hip city, and I was traveling through a bunch of US states a while ago, and I am a weed connoisseur, and can you believe that out of all of the states which I visited, which were many, just about the only place where I didn't manage to buy any weed was in San Francisco? What a joke. Every other state was easy. Maybe it was just extremely bad luck, but that didn't help San Francisco's image much in my opinion.

  • Reply 36 of 195
    adamcadamc Posts: 580member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by ClemyNX View Post





    Are you a recycling specialist? Apparently no, because glue does make recycling much more difficult.


    How so?

  • Reply 37 of 195
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,985member
    jragosta wrote: »
    It's really sad how we let idiots make decisions for us. Glue does not make the laptop any less recyclable - and Apple leads the industry (by far) in recyclability of its computers.

    The glue isn't the problem, it's the battery. Not being able to easily remove it is a cause for concern for recycling purposes.
  • Reply 38 of 195
    adamcadamc Posts: 580member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by markbyrn View Post


    I have yet to figure out why Apple took the step to remove Macs that were already EPEAT certified.  Even if one current machine or perhaps future machines don't meet the standard, than deal with it, but just pulling out completely and withdrawing already certified machines doesn't seem to smell right.  Is this a case of Apple having a temper tantrum because EPEAT wouldn't change the standards to ensure their new Retina Mac would be certified?   Being as Apple is located in a region of the country where the religion of Green is perhaps the strongest and you pay lip service even if you don't really live the religion, you really have to question the decision making process here.  I understand Mr. Cook wants to 'double-down' on secrecy but unless Apple has a new form of leafy green brilliance under it's sleeve, this move might be very costly in terms of losing government contracts.  



    Apple have $74B parked overseas showed the US market is no big deal.

  • Reply 39 of 195
    quadra 610quadra 610 Posts: 6,746member
    knightlie wrote: »
    Not surprising, this was bound to happen. It's very disappointing that Apple have chosen to go in this direction.

    LMAO are you new?

    You think Tim Cook *doesn't* have a plan? Do you think this comes as a surprise to him?

    This is Apple. They've already seen several steps ahead and have planned accordingly. Save your disappointment for the rest of the industry.
  • Reply 40 of 195
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    danv2 wrote: »
    They are 40% of the purchases and systems installed at the government organization I work for. This is a dangerous thing as we have become pretty reliant on them. I'm not kidding or joking.

    Unless your agency wants to take a symbolic stand against Apple then there are plenty of currently sold Macs that have passed EPEAT certification even if they are not currently listed.

    As I stated in the first thread on this issue, I think Apple is moving to a new design that is more iDevice-like and therefore will continue to make further EPEAT certifications impossible. Therefore they being proactive about retaining the control here.

    How many is 40%? How much profit is that really for Apple compared to the retail priced for the millions of consumers that might not buy a Mac because a competitor is making a better system that they can't compete with while trying to maintain EPEAT ratings across their entire Mac line? Let's not forget that other vendors have a vast number of models compared to a very small number of SKUs from Apple

    If anyone is negatively affected here it's the users that rely on Macs in an agency that doesn't want to admit how outmoded EPEAT is or the hypocrisy that they don't require it for other devices. I'm guessing that eventually the desire for Macs will win out before Apple's desire for a few government sales.
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