Product leaks prompt Apple CEO Tim Cook to take security to new levels

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
Security practices at Apple under Tim Cook are now even tighter than they were when Steve Jobs was at the helm, according to a new in-depth look at the company's secrecy.

Jacqui Cheng of Ars Technica published a new look at Apple's security and the effect it has on the company's engineering teams. For the feature, she spoke with a number of sources at Apple about paranoia, and how some employees believe the increased security may be having a negative effect on Apple's engineers.

In one example, an unnamed employee said only a handful of Apple workers were allowed to take a new iOS device off campus for real-life use. That person found it "really disturbing" that a device that would be shipped to millions of customers would see such limited testing.

The story was published as Apple is set to hold a media event on Tuesday, at which it is expected to unveil a smaller 7.85-inch iPad along with new Macs. Numerous details on the still-unannounced products have leaked months in advance, including pictures claiming to show the future devices.

It was the same situation a month ago, when Apple unveiled the iPhone 5 with a taller 4-inch display, as well as a new iPod touch and iPod nano. Most details about those products, including pictures of the devices before their official unveiling, leaked onto the Internet weeks and even months in advance.

Leaks


The unnamed Apple employees who Cheng spoke with indicated that the frequency of product leaks is just a byproduct of globalization. One employee said Apple's security practices are designed to prevent U.S. employees from leaking information, but most product leaks come from China, where Apple's devices are assembled and packaged.

"The leaks may be a result of Apple's impressive manufacturing operations ??which are largely credited to the expertise of Tim Cook, who built his expertise in operations and supply chain management," Cheng wrote. "The results for users have been impressive: do you want your iPhone 5 assembled the minute you place the order online and shipped to your home days later, or do you want to wait six months before it arrives?"




Cook himself vowed in an interview in May of this year that Apple would "double down" on secrecy and security. Though the CEO said he was "very serious" about stopping leaks, information about and pictures of Apple's iPhone 5, new iPods, and anticipated "iPad mini" have all leaked before their formal unveiling.

Product leaks ahead of their announcement are said to be upsetting for Apple engineers, who are proud of the company's product unveilings. But the leaks are also said to cause Apple to "react by clamping down harder on the employees it can control."

"They keep tightening up things on us ??there are code names upon code names upon code names," one unnamed employee told Cheng.

For more, see the full story published Monday at Ars Technica.
«13456

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 105


    So… "doubling down", as it were. 


     


    And why would they care about people mocking stuff up? They're pitched as mock-ups, not the actual product.

  • Reply 2 of 105


    Given that Apple has always had tight security, and given that they have recently made it even tighter, my conclusion is that the recent "leaks" in the media are really stories planted by Apple to get advanced publicity.  You can't buy that kind of PR!


     


    Apple knows how to best get a lot of buzz about their products, and how to make sure that lots of people are waiting to buy on day one.  So far, the strategy has worked very well.

  • Reply 3 of 105


    Given that Apple has always had tight security, and given that they have recently made it even tighter, my conclusion is that the recent "leaks" in the media are really stories planted by Apple to get advanced publicity.  You can't buy that kind of PR!


     


    Apple knows how to best get a lot of buzz about their products, and how to make sure that lots of people are waiting to buy on day one.  So far, the strategy has worked very well.

  • Reply 4 of 105


    Given that Apple has always had tight security, and given that they have recently made it even tighter, my conclusion is that the recent "leaks" in the media are really stories planted by Apple to get advanced publicity.  You can't buy that kind of PR!


     


    Apple knows how to best get a lot of buzz about their products, and how to make sure that lots of people are waiting to buy on day one.  So far, the strategy has worked very well.

  • Reply 5 of 105
    apple ][apple ][ Posts: 9,233member


    Good!


     


    I've been saying all along that all of these leaks are ridiculous, and heads need to roll. Tightened security should definitely be a priority.

  • Reply 6 of 105


    Given that Apple has always had tight security, and given that they have recently made it even tighter, my conclusion is that the recent "leaks" in the media are really stories planted by Apple to get advanced publicity.  You can't buy that kind of PR!


     


    Apple knows how to best get a lot of buzz about their products, and how to make sure that lots of people are waiting to buy on day one.  So far, the strategy has worked very well.

  • Reply 7 of 105


    Given that Apple has always had tight security, and given that they have recently made it even tighter, my conclusion is that the recent "leaks" in the media are really stories planted by Apple to get advanced publicity.  You can't buy that kind of PR!


     


    Apple knows how to best get a lot of buzz about their products, and how to make sure that lots of people are waiting to buy on day one.  So far, the strategy has worked very well.

  • Reply 8 of 105


    Given that Apple has always had tight security, and given that they have recently made it even tighter, my conclusion is that the recent "leaks" in the media are really stories planted by Apple to get advanced publicity.  You can't buy that kind of PR!


     


    Apple knows how to best get a lot of buzz about their products, and how to make sure that lots of people are waiting to buy on day one.  So far, the strategy has worked very well.

  • Reply 9 of 105


    Given that Apple has always had tight security, and given that they have recently made it even tighter, my conclusion is that the recent "leaks" in the media are really stories planted by Apple to get advanced publicity.  You can't buy that kind of PR!


     


    Apple knows how to best get a lot of buzz about their products, and how to make sure that lots of people are waiting to buy on day one.  So far, the strategy has worked very well.

  • Reply 10 of 105


    Given that Apple has always had tight security, and given that they have recently made it even tighter, my conclusion is that the recent "leaks" in the media are really stories planted by Apple to get advanced publicity.  You can't buy that kind of PR!


     


    Apple knows how to best get a lot of buzz about their products, and how to make sure that lots of people are waiting to buy on day one.  So far, the strategy has worked very well.

  • Reply 11 of 105


    Given that Apple has always had tight security, and given that they have recently made it even tighter, my conclusion is that the recent "leaks" in the media are really stories planted by Apple to get advanced publicity.  You can't buy that kind of PR!


     


    Apple knows how to best get a lot of buzz about their products, and how to make sure that lots of people are waiting to buy on day one.  So far, the strategy has worked very well.

  • Reply 12 of 105


    Given that Apple has always had tight security, and given that they have recently made it even tighter, my conclusion is that the recent "leaks" in the media are really stories planted by Apple to get advanced publicity.  You can't buy that kind of PR!


     


    Apple knows how to best get a lot of buzz about their products, and how to make sure that lots of people are waiting to buy on day one.  So far, the strategy has worked very well.

  • Reply 13 of 105


    Given that Apple has always had tight security, and given that they have recently made it even tighter, my conclusion is that the recent "leaks" in the media are really stories planted by Apple to get advanced publicity.  You can't buy that kind of PR!


     


    Apple knows how to best get a lot of buzz about their products, and how to make sure that lots of people are waiting to buy on day one.  So far, the strategy has worked very well.

  • Reply 14 of 105


    Given that Apple has always had tight security, and given that they have recently made it even tighter, my conclusion is that the recent "leaks" in the media are really stories planted by Apple to get advanced publicity.  You can't buy that kind of PR!


     


    Apple knows how to best get a lot of buzz about their products, and how to make sure that lots of people are waiting to buy on day one.  So far, the strategy has worked very well.

  • Reply 15 of 105
    emig647emig647 Posts: 2,455member
    I'll admit, since all of the product / part leaks, I've been less excited about product launches. That was one thing that I always looked forward to, the things I didn't know was coming out. No more "One more thing"... :(
  • Reply 16 of 105
    I don't agree if this is the focus. The leaks that are killing them are the parts coming out of Asia and not leaks from the engineers. Testing devices in the wild was obviously problematic for them given the iPhone 4 fiasco, and the incident in SF.

    It is time to go beat on the suppliers. That is what I see as the most costly leaks.
  • Reply 17 of 105

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by NakedApe2 View Post


    Given that Apple has always had tight security, and given that they have recently made it even tighter, my conclusion is that the recent "leaks" in the media are really stories planted by Apple to get advanced publicity.  You can't buy that kind of PR!


     


    Apple knows how to best get a lot of buzz about their products, and how to make sure that lots of people are waiting to buy on day one.  So far, the strategy has worked very well.



     


    I think you should post this a few more times... Looks like the last 15 times wasn't good enough. ;)

  • Reply 18 of 105
    rob53rob53 Posts: 3,267member
    @tallest They're pitched as being made from actual products and impact the stock market as if they were actual products. Stock market manipulation is in a wild fire state of insanity. Anyone can provide a "mock up" of a suggested Apple product and people will believe it's the real thing. Many of these mock ups are being released to show a lack of functionality, again manipulating stock prices. Apple is serious about their real products being copied (sorry, Samsung, you did copy no matter what a judge says) so allowing anything to be seen by people other than those you absolutely trust is a bad thing. This isn't just Apple we're talking about, it's any company planning on releasing a new product that doesn't want a competitor to release something similar before they release their product. Product development security is important, don't eve think it isn't.
  • Reply 19 of 105
    winterwinter Posts: 1,238member
    Apple II[ wrote: »
    Good!

    I've been saying all along that all of these leaks are ridiculous, and heads need to roll. Tightened security should definitely be a priority.

    F... that. Let them fly and get people excited. Intel makes the processors,, nVidia (for the time being) makes the graphics, etc. nothing is a true shock.

    Put out a great product and it will sell. Leaks or not.
  • Reply 20 of 105
    apple ][apple ][ Posts: 9,233member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by NakedApe2 View Post


    Given that Apple has always had tight security, and given that they have recently made it even tighter, my conclusion is that the recent "leaks" in the media are really stories planted by Apple to get advanced publicity.  You can't buy that kind of PR!


     


    Apple knows how to best get a lot of buzz about their products, and how to make sure that lots of people are waiting to buy on day one.  So far, the strategy has worked very well.



    And my conclusion is that you are in serious tinfoil hat territory.


     


    Apple gets all of the PR that it does, because it is the best and most influential tech company on the planet, with hundreds of millions of extremely happy customers. And when Apple releases a new product, it is news everywhere, and the media are going to write about it, because everybody is interested in reading about what the most innovative tech company is up to.


     


    Your theory makes no sense at all, it is quite delusional to put it rather mildly. When somebody presents a retarded conspiracy theory, the burden is on them to provide proof to back up their insane ramblings.


     


    Apple's products don't sell because of PR, they sell because Apple consistently delivers kick fucking ass products, and people are more than happy to fork over their hard earned money to own said products.

Sign In or Register to comment.