Windows 8 tablets grab 7% of shipments, Apple's iPad still controls nearly half

Posted:
in iPad edited January 2014
Apple's iPad offerings continue to dominate the tablet segment, but tablets running Windows 8 have had a small impact, accounting for one in fourteen tablets shipped in the first quarter of 2013.

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Global tablet shipments in the first quarter of 2013 hit 40.6 million units, according to new figures from Strategy Analytics. Of those, Apple's iPad and iPad mini accounted for 19.5 million units, or 48.2 percent of the market. That figure is down from the same quarter a year ago, when the iPad had 63.1 percent of quarterly shipped units.

The difference this year: increasing competition. From Google's Nexus 7 to Samsung's Galaxy Note 8.0, the Android tablet segment has grown from 34.2 percent of shipments last year to 43.4 percent of shipments for this quarter. The three months from January through March saw 17.6 million Android tablets shipped, narrowing the shipment gap between Android and iOS quickly.

Microsoft's Windows 8 platform is also a relatively new entrant into the tablet sector. Windows 8 tablets accounted for 7.4 percent of tablet shipments last quarter, or three million units. Less than one-sixth the number of iPads shipped, the platform's sales figures are a disappointment for Microsoft, which has found itself scrambling to regroup and retool its approach to the tablet market.

Still, the company and its partners now have a foothold in the segment, one from which they will attempt to expand Windows 8's footprint. While the traditional PC market is imploding, the tablet market is flourishing, having grown 117 percent year-on-year through the first quarter.

Strategy Analytics' figures are based on shipments, and not necessarily indicative of sales through to consumers. Previous measures of web traffic show Apple's iPad leagues ahead of the competition, regardless of projected shipment numbers.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 141
    steven n.steven n. Posts: 1,228member
    I still want to know who is actually using all those Android tablets. With phones, you could always argue people just use them as feature phones to explain the 100's of million of missing phones in use but with tablets??? That just does not make sense to me.
  • Reply 2 of 141
    nagrommenagromme Posts: 2,834member
    "Strategy Analytics' figures are based on shipments, and not necessarily indicative of sales through to consumers."

    Eventually the discrepancy has to end with either non-iPads being given away at fire-sale cut-our-losses prices, or being destroyed.
  • Reply 3 of 141
    mauszmausz Posts: 243member


    It's not 3% but 3 million which is 7.4% according to the tables ?!?


     


    7.4% is quite a decent effort for a newcomer

  • Reply 4 of 141

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post



    ... shipped ..... shipments .... shipped units.... percent of shipments ... shipments .... tablets shipped.... shipment gap ..... shipments last quarter... iPads shipped.... based on shipments, and not necessarily indicative of sales through to consumers..... projected shipment......


    OK. 

  • Reply 5 of 141
    Oh well there goes the chance of Office being put on iOS. Maybe it's time for Apple to sort out iBooks and make it available on Windows and Android platform. That might kill off Flash once and for all.
  • Reply 6 of 141
    saareksaarek Posts: 1,422member


    So, they've "shipped" a lot of units, they've almost certainly sold a lot less than the figures above and that's before you add in the inevitable returns which based on the RT model alone is pretty high.

  • Reply 7 of 141
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    mausz wrote: »
    It's not 3% but 3 million which is 7.4% according to the tables ?!?

    7.4% is quite a decent effort for a newcomer

    1) Points for noting their percentage is much higher.

    2) I agree that 7.4% is decent and 3 million licenses isn't bad, but they are by no means a newcomer. iOS and Android and the newcomers.
  • Reply 8 of 141
    pendergastpendergast Posts: 1,358member
    Let me guess: of these "numbers", only Apple is the one with real, released numbers.
  • Reply 9 of 141
    mdriftmeyermdriftmeyer Posts: 7,503member
    Who gives a rat's behind about shipments? Sales are what matter.

    Shipping and subsidizing [Microsoft] don't make sales.
  • Reply 11 of 141
    drblankdrblank Posts: 3,383member
    3%. I guess Microsoft is now enjoying the kind of market share Apple's had in the desktop and laptop market. Oh well, I guess Microsoft is becoming less relevant. Good. It's about time.
  • Reply 12 of 141
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,388member


    Originally Posted by Tom Wolfer View Post

    …they become an office productivity standard…


     


    Why would I expect that?

  • Reply 13 of 141
    majjomajjo Posts: 574member
    Seems to be mirroring the smartphone market of couple years ago quite well now.
  • Reply 14 of 141
    majjomajjo Posts: 574member
    steven n. wrote: »
    I still want to know who is actually using all those Android tablets. With phones, you could always argue people just use them as feature phones to explain the 100's of million of missing phones in use but with tablets??? That just does not make sense to me.

    I convinced my friend to get the nexus 7 instead of the kindle fire a while back. She uses it mainly as an e reader and browser, and is quite happy with it (the ability to get nook and Google play books was a huge boon to her).
  • Reply 15 of 141
    It's interesting that Android's 9% surge and Surface's 7.4 gains seem to be at iOS's -15% expense. Really wondering what to attribute that to. iPod cemented their lead by iterating so quickly. This doesn't seem to be playing out with iPad in the same way. Surprising to me, frankly.
  • Reply 16 of 141
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,388member


    Originally Posted by ddawson100 View Post

    This doesn't seem to be playing out with iPad in the same way. Surprising to me, frankly.


     


    You're absolutely joking, right? You've noticed the 90% marketshare the iPad has, yeah?

  • Reply 17 of 141
    jungmarkjungmark Posts: 6,924member
    So the web usage would be similar but they're not. Why is that?
  • Reply 18 of 141
    jragostajragosta Posts: 10,473member
    nagromme wrote: »
    "Strategy Analytics' figures are based on shipments, and not necessarily indicative of sales through to consumers."

    Eventually the discrepancy has to end with either non-iPads being given away at fire-sale cut-our-losses prices, or being destroyed.

    You're forgetting that roughly half of the WIndows Surface production was used to produce their silly commercials with hundreds of dancers. 8-)
  • Reply 19 of 141

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tom Wolfer View Post


    Expect Surface tablets to do better as they become an office productivity standard at home and work:


     


    http://tumbleweedmarketinganalytics.com/2012/06/20/surface-tablet-marketing-analytics-microsoft-surface-office-productivity-tablet/


     


    http://tumbleweedmarketinganalytics.com/tablet-ownership-in-canada/



     


    I couldn't disagree more. Nobody wants to use a tablet to create office documents. The screen and cover/keyboard offer a poor typing experience compared to today's desktops. It sounds like a good idea, but the experience will be rather cumbersome for anyone who wants to do real work. Tablets are and will remain consumption devices for the foreseeable future. It sounds like Apple has the right tack - maximize the experience. Microsoft is trying to leverage a product designed for a very different experience across its tablets. I predict a poor experience and dissatisfied users.

  • Reply 20 of 141
    emig647emig647 Posts: 2,448member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by ddawson100 View Post



    It's interesting that Android's 9% surge and Surface's 7.4 gains seem to be at iOS's -15% expense. Really wondering what to attribute that to. iPod cemented their lead by iterating so quickly. This doesn't seem to be playing out with iPad in the same way. Surprising to me, frankly.


     


    I really feel the true success for the iPod was a hit from multiple angles. A) iTunes Store caught on for purchasing music from home. B) Gift Cars were an easy gift to go along with that. C) iPod prices ranged from 99 to 499, which made even the cheapest iPod obtainable to just about anyone. 


     


    The iPad is too expensive for a lot of consumers. Not everyone makes enough money to justify blowing 500 on a tablet. I'm not saying Apple should lower their iPad prices or make cheaper iPads, but that definitely was a huge key to the iPod dominating that market. 

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