Samsung clone of Apple's Passbook hits Google Play for some Galaxy devices

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2014
Samsung's answer to Apple's Passbook feature has arrived on the Google Play Store for Android, giving select Galaxy device owners the ability to store tickets, coupons, and more.



Samsung Wallet hit the Google Play Store on Thursday and bears a strong resemblance to the Passbook feature Apple includes on iOS. The app was announced in beta for developers back in February, but it has only just now made it to the Play Store. It is compatible with the Galaxy S3, S4, Note, and Note 2.

Like Apple's Passbook, Samsung Wallet allows users to store and manage tickets, coupons, boarding passes, and membership cards. It also allows users to set time and location-based reminders to show tickets.

Initial supporters for Samsung Wallet include Walgreens, Major League Baseball, Expedia.com, Booking.com, Hotels.com, and Lufthansa in the United States.

The app raised eyebrows at its debut due to its striking resemblance to Apple's Passbook feature. Samsung even used a similar app icon when initially showing off the app. The two companies are engaged in a number of patent infringement suits in which Apple alleges that Samsung has copied not only the physical look and feel of its iPhone and iPad, but also the iOS software powering those devices.

Since Passbook's debut, it has gone on to become quite popular in a trial run at Major League Baseball stations, with some 13 MLB stadiums accepting Passbook at their ticket gates this season. It has also seen wide support from Starbucks, Fandango, Amtrak, and a number of airlines.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 97
    pazuzupazuzu Posts: 1,728member


    In yo' face Apple- In yo' face! 


    (cue in Stewie Griffin)

  • Reply 2 of 97
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 15,375moderator
    Hasn't Samsung heard that Android is more feature-rich than iOS? They don't need to do this, Android is ahead and iOS is playing catchup. These features must already be in there somewhere, just look in the filesystem.
  • Reply 3 of 97
    Samsung may be the best followers in tech. Sure it may not be ethical to blatantly copy a companies every move, but they are making profits. The court's move way to slow to stop them and the patent system is a joke.

    If you can't afford Apple, Samesung will probably make a decent knock off product and eventually they will try to incorporate Apple's features as well.
  • Reply 4 of 97
    jungmarkjungmark Posts: 6,926member
    Doesn't Sammy know, NFC is the big thing. /s
  • Reply 6 of 97
    gazoobeegazoobee Posts: 3,754member


    "Samsung even used a similar app icon when initially showing off the app." 


     


    This is kind of standard practice really.  When everyone in your target audience already knows your a copyist, (I mean that's why they are buying your products in the first place), you need to let everyone know quickly and directly which thing, this new thing is a copy of.  Once that's established, you can respond to the inevitable letter from the lawyers of the company whose IP you are copying, and change it just enough to avoid prosecution.  


     


    It's kind of like a legal way to make an actual public announcement that you are copying this or that feature or product, without the legal liability of admitting same.  You often get some free advertising in the form of shocked articles from tech journalists on the web etc. as well.  

  • Reply 7 of 97
    analogjackanalogjack Posts: 1,073member



     


     


    Quote:


    The app raised eyebrows at its debut due to its striking resemblance to Apple's Passbook feature.



     


    It would have been a surprise only if it did not resemble Apple's passbook.

  • Reply 8 of 97
    customtbcustomtb Posts: 346member
    Innovation! /s
  • Reply 9 of 97
    nikiloknikilok Posts: 383member
    I wonder why they bothered putting it in Google play store if it's only meant for galaxy series.
    Might aswell have bundled it with an OS upgrade.
  • Reply 10 of 97
    nikiloknikilok Posts: 383member
    Sheesh the state of Google play is funny.
    You ll find apps on there that isn't compatible with your handset even if it's the latest and greatest flagship HTC phone, coz it's made to run on Samsung phones. So eventually you'll end up seeing 25 different passbook apps from every other vendor.
  • Reply 11 of 97
    drblankdrblank Posts: 3,385member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by jungmark View Post



    Doesn't Sammy know, NFC is the big thing. /s


    They probably know as much as most of their customers.  NFC? Huh?  What's that?  Most of the Android phone users I know didn't know what NFC was, what it stood for, what it did and if it was in their phone, so obviously it wasn't a reason they bought the product.  Typically for Android users they buy the product because it's cheap or it has a big screen.  

  • Reply 12 of 97
    nikiloknikilok Posts: 383member
    customtb wrote: »
    Innovation! /s

    Samesung's like hell with innovation we tried it with S4 retina tracking and that Jedi air touch no ones buying it. Let's stick with our true strengths cloning !

    Only a matter of time before they go to the car companies asking them to implement Samsung in the car feature.
  • Reply 13 of 97
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 24,340member
    nikilok wrote: »
    Sheesh the state of Google play is funny.
    You ll find apps on there that isn't compatible with your handset even if it's the latest and greatest flagship HTC phone, coz it's made to run on Samsung phones. So eventually you'll end up seeing 25 different passbook apps from every other vendor.

    I don't think you're offered apps that won't work on your particular Android device. Now if you're not signed in and just browsing around or don't own an Android device in the first place then you can see every app there is.
  • Reply 14 of 97
    spicedspiced Posts: 98member
    Shamescum did it again!
  • Reply 15 of 97
    nikiloknikilok Posts: 383member
    drblank wrote: »
    They probably know as much as most of their customers.  NFC? Huh?  What's that?  Most of the Android phone users I know didn't know what NFC was, what it stood for, what it did and if it was in their phone, so obviously it wasn't a reason they bought the product.  Typically for Android users they buy the product because it's cheap or it has a big screen.  

    Oh dint you see the kids bump there phones to transfer files using NFC ?
    They'll end up having a good work out if they had to share files with 10 people. It's like going back to the mail man delivering letters days. Walk all the way and bump!
  • Reply 16 of 97
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member
    No Apple patents on this one?
  • Reply 17 of 97
    drblankdrblank Posts: 3,385member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by nikilok View Post





    Samesung's like hell with innovation we tried it with S4 retina tracking and that Jedi air touch no ones buying it. Let's stick with our true strengths cloning !



    Only a matter of time before they go to the car companies asking them to implement Samsung in the car feature.


    I ran into one fellow that had a Droid and he was showing me that face recognition to replace a password log in.  he said it didn't work when he grew a beard.  It was funny or if he shaved his beard.  Plus it takes a while to recognize.




    I think a lot of these so-called cool features that Android phones have are more like a cool demo feature, but always a "I use the feature daily and can't live without it" feature.




    I do think that having IR to replace a remote control is useful.  That's something I would use if it was built in and they had all of the codes for the stereo/audio equipment I used.  That's a useful feature.  But the hand free control?   I might use that feature once in a while.  Maybe.  The bump feature?  I think that's kinda dumb.




    I think these guys use the shotgun approach when it comes to adding features, because once in a while they might actually hit the target.  But that's most technology companies.


     


    Some features companies add are sometimes not very well implemented OR they might be a little ahead of their time and it needs some more development time to make it a daily use feature.  I've seen that a lot.

  • Reply 18 of 97
    The iHaters claim that Apple is doomed.

    Then, what will Samsung use for "inspiration" ?
  • Reply 19 of 97
    Anyone knows the idiot at google who came up with "google play" name?!!
  • Reply 20 of 97
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    No Apple patents on this one?

    What's to patent? The prior art is legion. Anyone would think Apple has invented something new here. Japan has had NFC electronic payments via phone for nearly a decade.
    One Japanese airline lets passengers use the wallet phone to speed up check-ins at airports and next year you'll be able to use the phones to begin paying for train rides and video rentals.
    http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/tech/wireless/phones/2004-07-22-wallet-phone_x.htm

    That's 2004 people.
    TOKYO — As it is, you don't leave home without it. In a world of cashless payment, why not simply make your cell phone a wallet? Japan has long been phasing out the hassle of coins and bills with microchip-laden "smart cards," which let people make electronic payments for everything from lunch to the daily commute.
    By putting theP506iC mobile phone to the Edy card machine, you can pay for coffee, store purchases, movie tickets and dinner bills with a flick of the handset.
    Shizuo Kambayashi, AP

    But even smart cards could be on their way out, their plastic presence overtaken by virtual-wallet technology now available in the everyday cell phone.

    Other nations, led by South Korea, already have so-called mobile commerce payment schemes in place that let people punch keys on their cell phones so that the devices trigger transactions.


    Samsung have been at this a lot longer than Apple:
    News
    Samsung to add payment function to cell phones
    By Sumner Lemon, IDG News Service
    August 31, 2004 09:47 AM ET


    IDG News Service - Samsung and Koninklijke Philips Tuesday said they are teaming up to incorporate Near-Field Communication technology in future cell-phone models from Samsung, giving users the ability to use their phones to make payments.

    That's only 8 years before Apple came up with Passbook.

    So who's the copycat?
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