Apple cracks down on Personal Hotspot abuse with iOS 7.1 update

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  • Reply 61 of 136
    bulk001bulk001 Posts: 764member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post





    The decision didn't make it legal to tether. Verizon was blocking tethering apps; one of the stipulations when they won the auction for their LTE frequency bands was that they could not block software on devices accessing the LTE network. They had no choice but allow the use tethering apps on their phones whereas other carriers blocked them.

    Meh, the Sprint guy told me that because of the precedent set by this ruling I was allowed to tether (but Sprint would not provide me with a way to do that unless I paid a monthly fee to turn the feature on). Either way, jailbreaking took care of it. If they were to terminate my contract for doing it, their coverage around here is so poor that I am not sure it would make a difference ... 

  • Reply 62 of 136
    woochiferwoochifer Posts: 385member

    If you must have tethering, you can either pay for it (either as a separate add-on or as part of a service plan that includes tethering) or hack your phone to get something for free that's not part of your cell service agreement.  The latter option is not something that you're entitled to, or that Apple is under any obligation to enable.  You want something for free, and somebody does not give it to you, figure out your own path. Don't ask Apple for the road map and the keys. 

     

    It's like paying for basic cable TV and finding out that you could watch HBO for free by changing a setting on the cable box. Just don't be so surprised if after a software update to the cable box, you find that you can only view what you paid for.

     

    Otherwise, if you want tethering, a lot of the service plans now include tethering for free.  I know that T-Mobile and AT&T's postpaid plans now include tethering (don't know about Sprint and Verizon).  For me, I use a $30/month TMo prepaid plan.  If I need tethering, I activate it and it's charged through the rest of the month on a prorated basis (up to $15/month).  So far, I've only needed it when traveling, and the monthly charge is still cheaper than what most business and conference hotels charge for wi-fi.

  • Reply 63 of 136
    I'm weeping, weeping for their loss... I pay extra $$ for an AT&T Plan with Personal Hotspot - you can too!
  • Reply 64 of 136
    woochiferwoochifer Posts: 385member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Curtis Hannah View Post



    If the carriers weren't so greedy they would all offer personal hotspot and unlimited data on one of there plans, helpful for price under $100 too.

    T-Mobile already does for $70/month.  If it's that important to you, then switch.  Right now, they'll even pay for your early termination fees.

     

    If you're sticking with another carrier because of other advantages they might have (i.e., better network coverage, data speed, etc.), then you're part of the problem because you're not holding your carrier's feet to the fire for not giving you what you want.

     

    Carriers are greedy. Of course they are! But, if enough customers want something enough to walk away from their current carriers, then you can bet that the other carriers will jump in. Just look at how AT&T reacted when T-Mobile's contract-free BYOD plans started catching on. Talk is cheap.  If you think carriers should be punished for not offering tethering and unlimited data, then put your money where you mouth (or keyboard) is.

  • Reply 65 of 136
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,002member
    woochifer wrote: »
    T-Mobile already does for $70/month.  If it's that important to you, then switch.  Right now, they'll even pay for your early termination fees.

    You only get 5GB of data to tether with.
  • Reply 66 of 136
    woochiferwoochifer Posts: 385member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post





    You only get 5GB of data to tether with.

    That's high-speed.  The data is unlimited, albeit throttled after 2.5 GB of tethering.

  • Reply 67 of 136
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,388member
    Originally Posted by jfc1138 View Post

    TANSTAAFL

     

    Trolling Apple Never Stops Taking Away All Feeling… Lighthearted?

     

    Originally Posted by prof View Post

    That's completely bogus. Theres no legal way some operator can forbid tethering via fine print…

     

    That explains why every single one of them can do it, huh.

     

    It's really painful to see Apple participate in such shady behaviour.


     

    How dare they follow the law! How DARE they make you keep agreeing to the terms to which you legally agreed!

     

    Originally Posted by John.B View Post

    Sometimes Apple does stupid shit.

     

    And sometimes users don’t think before posting stupidity.

     

    Either Apple blocks disallowed tethering and gets morons whining after them for “restriction of functionality” or Apple doesn’t block disallowed tethering and gets morons whining after them for “terminating my cell phone account i need that account apple how dare you i will sue you”.

     

    Personally, I’m fine with the former.

  • Reply 68 of 136
    Still working on US Cellular iPhone. I think I'm supposed to pay extra for the "privilege" of using my data however I want but it's always worked straight out of the box. Using 7.1 with bluetooth tethering to create this post.
  • Reply 69 of 136

    I'm not sure why so many are getting their panties in a twist. This is about those people on "unlimited data plans" where there is an express exclusion of tethered devices.

     

     

    This is not about those who pay for 2, 5 ,10Gb data - you can use that cap how you see fit. I get 3Gb/ month that I can use how I like.

  • Reply 70 of 136
    sudonymsudonym Posts: 233member

    Good for Apple!  It is about time.

     

    People should not steal service and Apple should not be an accessory to that sort of thing.

  • Reply 71 of 136
    mdriftmeyermdriftmeyer Posts: 7,503member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post





    You only get 5GB of data to tether with.

     

    Well, it's not your network. They built it, manage it and lease it.

  • Reply 72 of 136
    mdriftmeyermdriftmeyer Posts: 7,503member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Woochifer View Post

     

    T-Mobile already does for $70/month.  If it's that important to you, then switch.  Right now, they'll even pay for your early termination fees.

     

    If you're sticking with another carrier because of other advantages they might have (i.e., better network coverage, data speed, etc.), then you're part of the problem because you're not holding your carrier's feet to the fire for not giving you what you want.

     

    Carriers are greedy. Of course they are! But, if enough customers want something enough to walk away from their current carriers, then you can bet that the other carriers will jump in. Just look at how AT&T reacted when T-Mobile's contract-free BYOD plans started catching on. Talk is cheap.  If you think carriers should be punished for not offering tethering and unlimited data, then put your money where you mouth (or keyboard) is.


     

    Still doesn't disclaim the fact the network is their [ATT, VZ, Sprint, T-Mobile, etc] product, their services, their business model.

  • Reply 73 of 136
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,002member
    Well, it's not your network. They built it, manage it and lease it.

    I wasn't complaining. Just making a 'matter of fact' statement.
  • Reply 74 of 136
    If you pay for the data AND get overcharged for overages what business is the carriers how you or I use the data? This is plain and simple abuse by these greedy SOB's!!! I for one would simply stop paying for a service that would impose this tiny text rip-off on me. Catch me if you can Motherfuskers. I would jailbreak my phone and forever try to stick it up these suited rat bastards a$$es. I you don't agree or are offended Screw you and the hoar you road in buttpuppet pions!!!
  • Reply 75 of 136
    d4njvrzfd4njvrzf Posts: 797member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TeaEarleGreyHot View Post

     

     

    It's just too easy for a user to turn on tethering when the carrier prohibits it, and subsequently find that the carrier has terminated their plan, because of the data usage.  


    You are subject to overage charges regardless of whether you are paying for tethering privileges. Moreover, many smartphones already let the user monitor data usage and set caps (see for example http://www.pcadvisor.co.uk/how-to/google-android/3443819/set-data-usage-limit-on-android/) to completely avoid the scenario you posed. Tethering charges do not benefit consumers in any way.

  • Reply 76 of 136
    profprof Posts: 84member
    Quote:

    I don't know what country you're in, prof, but in the USA a contract is a contract, and it includes the fine print (Terms of Service).  Which in the case of at least StraightTalk, expressly forbids tethering (despite the advertised "unlimited data").  See my post above.  I agree it is unpleasant, but that is why I do not buy service from that carrier.  I get what I pay for.


    The fact is that tethering is a made up term used to describe a functionality of certain end devices instead of being a technical or lawful term that could be used to impose limits in contracts. Many devices (even those sold by the operators together with these contracts) are employing the very same "tethering" mechanism as the single possible way to use the data service at all. In Europe clauses in contracts which are surprising to the customer (eg. because they prevent the use of product for its intended purpose like here) are completely void. So while it would be lawful to exclude the use of a data service for more than one concurrent end device (which is quite likely what the tethering clauses are supposed to mean) it is not lawful to forbid the use of an intermediate access device (which is what tethering really means).

     

    In my opinion Apple here chose to play nice with the operators solely for their own gain without having any real obligation to do so.

  • Reply 77 of 136
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,002member
    prof wrote: »
    The fact is that tethering is a made up term used to describe a functionality of certain end devices instead of being a technical or lawful term that could be used to impose limits in contracts. Many devices (even those sold by the operators together with these contracts) are employing the very same "tethering" mechanism as the single possible way to use the data service at all. In Europe clauses in contracts which are surprising to the customer (eg. because they prevent the use of product for its intended purpose like here) are completely void. So while it would be lawful to exclude the use of a data service for more than one concurrent end device (which is quite likely what the tethering clauses are supposed to mean) it is not lawful to forbid the use of an intermediate access device (which is what tethering really means).

    In my opinion Apple here chose to play nice with the operators solely for their own gain without having any real obligation to do so.

    It's not a made up term. Originally the phone had to be wired (tethered) to a device. Then came wireless tethering, now we just leave the wireless part is left out
  • Reply 78 of 136
    profprof Posts: 84member
    Quote:

    How dare they follow the law! How DARE they make you keep agreeing to the terms to which you legally agreed!

     

    ...

     

    Either Apple blocks disallowed tethering and gets morons whining after them for “restriction of functionality” or Apple doesn’t block disallowed tethering and gets morons whining after them for “terminating my cell phone account i need that account apple how dare you i will sue you”.


     

    As you obviously figured out by yourself in the very same post Apple is not following any kind of law here they're simply facilitators for some network operators who put some (in many countries) void clauses into their terms and conditions. Also by enforcing some kind of incomplete whitelist they're obviously not only taking away functionality from customers whose operators try to (rightfully or not) block the functionality by contractual means but also from operators which do not even try to forbid that kind of use but for some reason didn't make it onto the whitelist.

     

    The takeaway here is: Is it not up to Apple to decide and/or enforce who can use this function or not. That's strictly between the operator and the customer and Apple trying to be a MITM is shady behaviour.

  • Reply 79 of 136
    profprof Posts: 84member

    It's not a made up term. Originally the phone had to be wired (tethered) to a device. Then came wireless tethering, now we just leave the wireless part is left out

    The modem is separate from the main CPU that does the higher level network processing thus by your definition every smartphone is always using tethering which would forbid any use with a data service on those operators. That's the reason why I say that tethering is a made up term in this context because the implied meaning is completely different from technical reality.

  • Reply 80 of 136
    john.bjohn.b Posts: 2,742member

    Quote:


    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

     

    And sometimes users don’t think before posting stupidity.


     

    You know that restricting APN changes affects more than tethering?  No, you didn't?  Yeah, I didn't think so.

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