Tim Cook talks Apple Watch, Apple Pay, and IBM partnership at Goldman Sachs conference

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  • Reply 61 of 108

    Fine, how about yourself?  

  • Reply 62 of 108
    Fine, how about yourself?  

    Just checking. I'm fine, thanks.
  • Reply 63 of 108
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismY View Post

     

    2) Good Monday Note this week about Apple's continued efforts in breaking all the laws of large numbers.


    Very interesting read, Soli, thanks. Even more interesting is the statistic that 1% of the world's population bought an iPhone last quarter. I remember when Steve, during a conference call in mid 2007 (in a weakened voice, if I [sadly] recall correctly), said he'd be happy with a 1% share of the total yearly global cell phone market. 2007 was the first year global cell phone sales topped 1 billion so I believe that his goal was 10 million for the first full year iPhone was sold (2008). Feel free to correct me if my memory is failing.

  • Reply 64 of 108
    The Apple Watch is possibly useful for healthy individuals who want to become primed athletes that compete and useful for truly sick individuals that need constant health vitals monitoring. That's the true market for this watch. Will people buy it as a novelty or believe it may be miracle from God? Yes, but it's just a waste of money on a frivolous item.

    Treadmills and other equipment in gyms have heart rate monitors. That's all the average person needs when they do cardio. If doing cardio outdoors is your preference then your likely more obsessed with the results, such as athletes are. The average person doesn't need a heart rate monitor when completing a weightlifting workout as quickly as one can possibly complete.

    solipsismy wrote: »
    That's existed for awhile now. If you're concerned about that, just make sure you have "Hey Siri" disabled in your Settings, but note that just because you have something actively disabled in SW don't think for a second that there isn't ways these microphones can't be recording your voice. I think it's foolish to think that because you disabled "Hey Siri" that you're somehow safer than if you enabled it, or that a company that makes a device that's designed to listen to your commands is someone more nefarious than one that puts in a tiny microphone and enables it without your knowledge.

    Oh hey Snowden, is that you? I'll let you get back to your tinfoil hat collection.
  • Reply 65 of 108



    Your implication being, then?  

  • Reply 66 of 108
    Very interesting read, Soli, thanks. Even more interesting is the statistic that 1% of the world's population bought an iPhone last quarter. I remember when Steve, during a conference call in mid 2007 (in a weakened voice, if I [sadly] recall correctly), said he'd be happy with a 1% share of the total yearly global cell phone market. 2007 was the first year global cell phone sales topped 1 billion so I believe that his goal was 10 million for the first full year iPhone was sold (2008). Feel free to correct me if my memory is failing.

    That sounds right to me. I failed to remember it properly earlier in this thread.

    So what would 1% of the watch market be for Apple? Are there more than 1 billion watches sold per year right now? Considering how cheap they are I wouldn't be surprised.
  • Reply 67 of 108

    Why is the ?Watch in a Game Center icon diorama in the first picture?

  • Reply 68 of 108

    Tim Cook should really listen to advice from people who are less successful at running companies than the current CEO of Apple.

  • Reply 69 of 108
    Poor Cook.

    So the Apple Watch's stand-out feature is reduced to—

    Reminding you to stand up. Woo hoo!

    Cook is busy engaged in damage limitation. By comparing the Apple Watch and the current smartwatch market to the iPod and the music player market, he is effectively saying, "This is a tiny market. Yes, we'll be the best of breed, but don't expect much from us, because there just ain't too many folks who have or want smart watches."

    As the resident bubble-burster of Apple Insider, it gives me no joy to pour cold water on the efforts of good people. One can hardly blame them; after all, they have no Steve Jobs to lead and inspire them, and to see the future.

    The misstep of the Apple Watch will do Apple and Cook good, and for that, I am thankful.

    More of your nonsense drivel. Please, put some clothes on.
  • Reply 70 of 108
    jungmark wrote: »
    The iPod made the MP3 market what is was prior to the iPhone. The Apple watch might do the same thing with smart watches. Why denigrate a product when you haven't seen it in person?

    It's the only sad life he has. Outside of this forum he is surely a completely unremarkable person.
  • Reply 71 of 108
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post





    Made a comment?



    Most perceptive of you.



    No, really. You made a clever reference: "...keeping a close pulse on the customer experience personally." Pulse. Apple Watch. Heart monitor. Pulse. Very clever of you. Good one!

  • Reply 72 of 108
    The music player market was huge prior to the iPod. Ever heard of the Walkman?

    Whereas the smartwatch market prior to the Apple Watch is minuscule.

    What rubbish and untrue nonsense. The Walkman had run dry many years prior. The discman sucked. By the late 90s music players were solid state but niche.

    Further, your pathetic analogy is broken since youre comparing the iPod to analog devices, but limiting the Apple watch to digital contemporaries.

    Stop reinventing history to match your dim narrative.
  • Reply 73 of 108
    trydtryd Posts: 135member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismY View Post



    If you still don't think the Mac will continue to get better you're still not paying attention. Apple's traditional "PCs" are going nowhere.

     

    I see this a lot - The Mac is going nowhere. So it is standing still, neither going forward or going back. Neither gaining nor losing marketshare.  Not getting better. Wouldn't it be better to say "It is not going away"?

     

    English is not my first language, so I may be missing something?

  • Reply 74 of 108
    tryd wrote: »
    I see this a lot - The Mac is going nowhere. So it is standing still, neither going forward or going back. Neither gaining nor losing marketshare.  Not getting better. Wouldn't it be better to say "It is not going away"?

    English is not my first language, so I may be missing something?

    get (or go) nowhere means making no progress. In context, it's a reply to those that insist it will be going away, as in disappearing as an option. Yes, it would be more accurate in the literal use of English to say it's not going away.
  • Reply 75 of 108
    trydtryd Posts: 135member

    Yes, I know, but it still sounds wrong. Going nowhere means, as you point oit, making no progress. Which is wrong when you talk about the Mac. It is definitely getting better, and making progress in marketshare, so going nowhere in this context is just wrong. It is not going nowhere, it is going forward, it is gaining. 

  • Reply 76 of 108

    Your implication being, then?  

    Precisely... "Then..."?
  • Reply 77 of 108
    tryd wrote: »
    Yes, I know, but it still sounds wrong. Going nowhere means, as you point oit, making no progress. Which is wrong when you talk about the Mac. It is definitely getting better, and making progress in marketshare, so going nowhere in this context is just wrong. It is not going nowhere, it is going forward, it is gaining. 

    It's an English language or American idiom, but note that doesn't make it wrong.


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  • Reply 78 of 108
    solipsismy wrote: »
    Please describe your interpretation of "massive success".

    There are certainly are many ways to measure that. What is the wrist-worn device market for mechanical and electronic devices today in terms of units, revenue, profits, etc.?

    If we used Steve Jobs old 1% of the smartphone unit share after one full year on the market as a measure I think that would be laughable since I would expect ?Watch to have a much higher percentage of the smartwatch market, despite being an accessory device to an iPhone. How about we through in all the health and fitness trackers into that mix since it's also designed to replace those for most people, too. Would that be fair? 1% of all fitness trackers + smart watches after 1 full year on the market?

    Jobs was gunning for 1% of the mobile phone market, not smartphone market.

    Nice try.
  • Reply 79 of 108
    eightzero wrote: »
    Made a comment?


    Most perceptive of you.


    No, really. You made a clever reference: "...keeping a close pulse on the customer experience personally." Pulse. Apple Watch. Heart monitor. Pulse. Very clever of you. Good one!

    It wasn't me that made that quip, but I did understand the joke. I elected to add a weaker one of my own. ????
  • Reply 80 of 108
    solipsismy wrote: »
    tryd wrote: »
    Yes, I know, but it still sounds wrong. Going nowhere means, as you point oit, making no progress. Which is wrong when you talk about the Mac. It is definitely getting better, and making progress in marketshare, so going nowhere in this context is just wrong. It is not going nowhere, it is going forward, it is gaining. 

    It's an English language or American idiom, but note that doesn't make it wrong.


    [VIDEO]

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    Yes, it does make it wrong.

    If you say, "You ain't going nowhere," if we overlook the slang, you actually mean, "We are going somewhere," because you are using a double negative.

    Similarly, when Pink Floyd sang that they didn't need no education, they meant that they did need education.

    Good for them. Modesty is attractive.
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