Tim Cook talks Apple Watch, Apple Pay, and IBM partnership at Goldman Sachs conference

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  • Reply 81 of 108
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,367member
    slurpy wrote: »
    "People were advising us to do something different in China, that people wouldn't pay for a great product there," he added. "It's a bunch of bull. It's not true. People want a great product. That doesn't mean every single person in the world can afford one yet, but everyone wants one. There's a pretty good business for us. We blocked out the noise of everybody saying you've got to do this or you've got to do that."

    Great fucking statement. Seems like he's responding to a lot of idiots on this very forum, and millions of others. Lost track of "APPLED NEEDS TO DO X OR ITS DOOMED" horse-shit. Glad Cook sees it as the useless noise it is. His staying the course, and not being intimidated by nay-sayers or letting them influence his thinking, is what makes him a great leader for Apple.

    100% agree.
  • Reply 82 of 108
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    I find it so amusing that ?Watch isn't even out yet and it's already being dumped in the rubbish bin. Yet other products get announced to raves from the press even before they've ever used the product. For example Microsoft Band got huge positive write ups on tech sites. Posters on MacRumors saying 'this is what Apple should have announced'. Then people get the product and the reviews are 'meh'. It's not comfortable to wear, the display easily scratches, Microsoft claimed 2 days battery life but people are getting half that, etc.

    Another example is Mont Blanc who announced a display that attaches to their watch band and rests on the back side of your wrist. It displays notifications, email etc. When they first announced it the render showed off this super hi res black and white display with text that looked better than what you'd see on a printed page. Once again the comments were 'this is how you do a smartwatch, Apple'. Of course when someone got a hold of the real thing we find the screen is very much not hi res, it's uncomfortable to wear and concerns over scratching because of how you wear it.

    The knee jerk reaction seems to be however someone else is doing something is how Apple should have done ?Watch. Tim Cook has actually been using ?Watch every day for probably several months now but we have to discount what he says because all of us who have never used the product certainly know better than him if it's any good. :rolleyes: Here's the thing..do people really believe Tim Cook would tell Wall Street investors that he uses something every day and can't live without it if that something was really a dud? That's a pretty bold claim to make. One would assume if ?Watch is really 'meh' Cook wouldn't be setting expectations so high.
  • Reply 83 of 108
    pmzpmz Posts: 3,433member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post



    Poor Cook.



    So the Apple Watch's stand-out feature is reduced to—



    Reminding you to stand up. Woo hoo!



    Cook is busy engaged in damage limitation. By comparing the Apple Watch and the current smartwatch market to the iPod and the music player market, he is effectively saying, "This is a tiny market. Yes, we'll be the best of breed, but don't expect much from us, because there just ain't too many folks who have or want smart watches."



    As the resident bubble-burster of Apple Insider, it gives me no joy to pour cold water on the efforts of good people. One can hardly blame them; after all, they have no Steve Jobs to lead and inspire them, and to see the future.



    The misstep of the Apple Watch will do Apple and Cook good, and for that, I am thankful.



    If you believe any of that, you are delusional nut bag.

     

    I suspect, you don't, and you just love starting shit.

  • Reply 84 of 108
    jungmarkjungmark Posts: 6,715member
    The music player market was huge prior to the iPod. Ever heard of the Walkman?

    Whereas the smartwatch market prior to the Apple Watch is minuscule.

    Last time I checked Walkmans at the time couldn't play mp3s
    solipsismy wrote: »
    That's existed for awhile now. If you're concerned about that, just make sure you have "Hey Siri" disabled in your Settings, but note that just because you have something actively disabled in SW don't think for a second that there isn't ways these microphones can't be recording your voice. I think it's foolish to think that because you disabled "Hey Siri" that you're somehow safer than if you enabled it, or that a company that makes a device that's designed to listen to your commands is someone more nefarious than one that puts in a tiny microphone and enables it without your knowledge.

    Don't worry, I disabled Siri use from the lock screen. It was tough on the 4S but better with the 6 and Touch ID.
    xixo wrote: »

    <h1 style="color:rgb(51,51,51);margin-bottom:5px;margin-top:0px;">Apple labour conditions: Chinese workers who make products for tech giant 'work 16 hours a day, 18 days in a row', BBC claims</h1>

    <a href="http://www.cnet.com/news/apple-chastised-for-unsafe-working-conditions-in-supplier-factory/" style="font-family:FranklinGothicFSCdRegular;font-size:30.2399997711182px;letter-spacing:-.009em;line-height:1em;" target="_blank">Apple chastised for unsafe working conditions in supplier factory</a>

    Troll much? Apple makes news. If the media spends half the time it spends on Apple following other companies, they'll find much worse conditions. At least Apple is trying to do something about it.
  • Reply 85 of 108
    pazuzupazuzu Posts: 1,728member
    Can u swim with this "watch"?
    Will it count my laps?
  • Reply 86 of 108
    calicali Posts: 3,495member
    I have some serious gripes about the watch. Last time I mentioned them some members got furious and lost their minds. They couldn't even read my comments correctly, put words in my mouth(post), and misunderstood everything I said.

    But here's a few concerns I have:

    1. It looks old. I wanted to see a iPod/iPhone/iPad-level revolution but instead got an ancient design. I had a watch that looked exactly like this a long time ago. They've existed for centuries.

    2. Everything ?Watch can do iPhone can too.
    Find someone with a crappy android phone and explain to them what the Applewatch can do that their ugly outdated android phone can't..... Tap your wrist? Phones already notify you by vibrating. Maps? Text?
    The fact that Apple spent time showing off photos at the ?Watch reveal is sad.

    3. Tethered to iPhone to work. Okay this is definitely gonna make a lot of people run out and buy iPhones but it's also going to scare people away.
    ?Watch is the perfect bridge to get android users to iPhone but if the bridge is closed.....

    4. The "digital crown"....
    Don't even get me started. I'm sure they'll ditch it by 2nd or 3rd gen.

    Let me be CLEAR once again.

    I'm NOT saying it won't sell. Of course it's gonna sell like crazy!!

    I'm NOT saying it should be compatible with android. Do you really think I'm that stupid??

    Anyways those are truly my gripes with the watch. I'm not trolling these are genuine feelings.
    Why is the ?Watch in a Game Center icon diorama in the first picture?

    That's a really neat display Apple used after the ?Watch reveal.

    I hope they use it again for in store and other places.
  • Reply 87 of 108

    Still can't see a use for the watch that makes it worth $349 and up.

  • Reply 88 of 108
    pfisher wrote: »
    Still can't see a use for the watch that makes it worth $349 and up.

    What about watches that do little more than tell the time? What makes them worth considerably more?
  • Reply 89 of 108
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,229moderator
    xixo wrote: »
    At the risk of playing the broken "what would Steve Jobs have done" recording, could anyone imagine Apple's co-founder sitting down with the likes of Goldman Sachs?

    When Steve was around, it was Tim who went to these conferences:

    http://www.businessinsider.com/live-apple-coo-tim-cook-at-the-goldman-tech-conference-2010-2

    Jeff Williams is sort of in Tim Cook's position now:

    https://www.apple.com/pr/bios/jeff-williams.html
    http://www.edibleapple.com/2011/09/13/jeff-williams-tim-cook-successor/
    http://fortune.com/2011/09/13/jeff-williams-apples-other-operations-whiz-2/

    but he is SVP of operations whereas Tim Cook was Chief Operating Officer (COO). Jeff Williams has been in Apple's marketing videos but I don't remember him in any other public presentation. The Goldman conference is a more public event and we saw at the government hearing on taxes how some of the execs aren't as cool under pressure as Tim.
    While I was initially thrilled that Apple decided to use my words in their advertising campaign (I thought to myself, out of all the words of beauty and grace from all the tongues and pens of man, Apple chose mine!), I got a little miffed about Apple's using my words against suicide to sell iPads.

    I think it would have been better if they'd used it in a similar way to the Think Different campaign that wasn't about a product.
    Then I only got short shrift by Apple's legal and executive departments which didn't help. Silence is wrong, particularly against me. I guess everybody who feels cheated by a big company must feel that? I don't know. I wish Apple didn't have that reputation, well earned as I well know, sadly.

    Do you mean they didn't pay royalties for its use? If the movie studio owns the rights to the screenplays, they'd have to pay them for its use.

    There's a transcript of the Goldman Sachs conference here, which is easier to skim through and quote than audio:

    http://www.imore.com/tim-cook-goldman-sachs-conference

    I think the watch is a good fit for Tim's lifestyle, its uses may or may not work for a large group of people. The interviewer said he wears his watch because his wife bought it for him. I've seen that with a few people where couples have exchanged gifts on their wedding day and the guy gets a watch:

    http://www.brides.com/wedding-engagement/2012/03/how-to-choose-a-watch-for-your-groom

    Those people might not want to switch it out for another watch. It'll still sell in the millions though. The Pebble watch crossed 1 million units so Apple will easily top that.
  • Reply 90 of 108
    jungmarkjungmark Posts: 6,715member
    cali wrote: »
    I have some serious gripes about the watch. Last time I mentioned them some members got furious and lost their minds. They couldn't even read my comments correctly, put words in my mouth(post), and misunderstood everything I said.

    But here's a few concerns I have:

    1. It looks old. I wanted to see a iPod/iPhone/iPad-level revolution but instead got an ancient design. I had a watch that looked exactly like this a long time ago. They've existed for centuries.

    2. Everything ?Watch can do iPhone can too.
    Find someone with a crappy android phone and explain to them what the Applewatch can do that their ugly outdated android phone can't..... Tap your wrist? Phones already notify you by vibrating. Maps? Text?
    The fact that Apple spent time showing off photos at the ?Watch reveal is sad.

    3. Tethered to iPhone to work. Okay this is definitely gonna make a lot of people run out and buy iPhones but it's also going to scare people away.
    ?Watch is the perfect bridge to get android users to iPhone but if the bridge is closed.....

    4. The "digital crown"....
    Don't even get me started. I'm sure they'll ditch it by 2nd or 3rd gen.

    1. Design is subjective. I trust Ive's vision.
    2. My iPhone is usually in my pocket. In cold weather, it's in my jacket and/or covered by my coat. It's easier to check my wrist than unzip my jacket, whip out the iphone.

    If I'm exercising, I rather take a glance at my watch rather than stop, take the iPhone out.
    3. iPods were tied to the Mac originally. In due time, Apple watch might be a stand-alone product but we shall see.
    4. What's wrong with the crown?
  • Reply 91 of 108
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by YvesVilleneuve View Post



    I'll pass on the whip watch. I'm sure many will not want to become a slave to a watch on a regular basis.

     

    I think Apple is making, yet again, a product that people don't understand.



    How often do we all joke, "I need a personal assistant!".



    The Watch is the first step towards that.  Wouldn't it be great to have a personal assistant walking behind you, carrying your phone, letting you know which TXTs/e-mails/Alerts were important, which appointments, etc etc?

     

    The "most personal device we (they) have ever made", is the beginning of that.

     

    People who say, "I don't need a smartwatch", are the ones who, 5 years from now, will say, "My personal-assistant is indispensible".



    It's not a Smart Watch, which most of us don't need, it's an intuitive personal assistant/communicator, that everyone who gets used to it WILL need.

  • Reply 92 of 108
    Marvin wrote: »
    When Steve was around, it was Tim who went to these conferences:

    http://www.businessinsider.com/live-apple-coo-tim-cook-at-the-goldman-tech-conference-2010-2

    Jeff Williams is sort of in Tim Cook's position now:

    https://www.apple.com/pr/bios/jeff-williams.html
    http://www.edibleapple.com/2011/09/13/jeff-williams-tim-cook-successor/
    http://fortune.com/2011/09/13/jeff-williams-apples-other-operations-whiz-2/

    but he is SVP of operations whereas Tim Cook was Chief Operating Officer (COO). Jeff Williams has been in Apple's marketing videos but I don't remember him in any other public presentation. The Goldman conference is a more public event and we saw at the government hearing on taxes how some of the execs aren't as cool under pressure as Tim.
    I think it would have been better if they'd used it in a similar way to the Think Different campaign that wasn't about a product.
    Do you mean they didn't pay royalties for its use? If the movie studio owns the rights to the screenplays, they'd have to pay them for its use.

    There's a transcript of the Goldman Sachs conference here, which is easier to skim through and quote than audio:

    http://www.imore.com/tim-cook-goldman-sachs-conference

    I think the watch is a good fit for Tim's lifestyle, its uses may or may not work for a large group of people. The interviewer said he wears his watch because his wife bought it for him. I've seen that with a few people where couples have exchanged gifts on their wedding day and the guy gets a watch:

    http://www.brides.com/wedding-engagement/2012/03/how-to-choose-a-watch-for-your-groom

    Those people might not want to switch it out for another watch. It'll still sell in the millions though. The Pebble watch crossed 1 million units so Apple will easily top that.

    If all the Apple Watch did was tell time and prevent people from losing their iPhones by tapping on their wrist every time the link between watch and phone was broken, they'd still sell millions.
  • Reply 93 of 108
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by aelegg View Post

     

     

    I think Apple is making, yet again, a product that people don't understand.



    How often do we all joke, "I need a personal assistant!".



    The Watch is the first step towards that.  Wouldn't it be great to have a personal assistant walking behind you, carrying your phone, letting you know which TXTs/e-mails/Alerts were important, which appointments, etc etc?

     

    The "most personal device we (they) have ever made", is the beginning of that.

     

    People who say, "I don't need a smartwatch", are the ones who, 5 years from now, will say, "My personal-assistant is indispensible".



    It's not a Smart Watch, which most of us don't need, it's an intuitive personal assistant/communicator, that everyone who gets used to it WILL need.




    With the size of the screen and usability, the watch is more of a "nice to have".

     

    Fort that price for the limits of what it can do (compared to phone), upgrades by consumers are not going to come often.

     

    It's really in iPad territory where it's really a luxury item of sorts (for a lot of people) - not necessary, but if you have the bucks, go for it and have a way to look at your watch instead of pulling your phone out.

     

    And a lot of people don't wear watches. I wear a $25 Casio that does what I need it to do. If it had GPS and all that, it would be nice for running, but not so necessary.

  • Reply 94 of 108

    I'm not as jazzed about the watch as others but at least I'm open minded. I'm titillated by what Apps are going to appear on this thing to compel us to buy it. I know Cook refers a lot to the health aspects of it. It tells you to stand up. It counts your daily walking/running mileage. Somehow it helps him in the gym. It monitors his heart. For all I know it plays a jingle every time you pleasure yourself.

     

    I'm intrigued by some of that but Apple must have something unexpected up its sleeve...or at the end of it. This is an entirely new concept and pushes 'personal' to new levels. I imagine Apple has a killer app or two in the lab to get us all excited.

     

    I'm just a tad nervous if it arrives without a killer app.

  • Reply 95 of 108
    jungmarkjungmark Posts: 6,715member
    bugsnw wrote: »
    For all I know it plays a jingle every time you pleasure yourself.

    Im gonna get sick of that jingle. ????
  • Reply 96 of 108
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by pfisher View Post

     

    And a lot of people don't wear watches. I wear a $25 Casio that does what I need it to do. If it had GPS and all that, it would be nice for running, but not so necessary.


     

    People are still taking a personal assistant (or whatever we should be calling it), and jamming it into a watch mindset.



    It's not a watch.  It's not a Smartwatch.  It will be a personal-assistant/intimate-communicator.



    It has nothing to do with your Casio, or someone's "Fit-Bit", or that iPad Nano watchband thing, etc etc.

     

    There's a new product category here.  Any attempt to compare it to today's products or today's needs misses the boat.

     

    This is a Henry Ford moment, "If I asked them what they wanted, they would've said 'Faster Horses' ".

     

    Android and all other smartwatches will piddle along as they have been.  Tiny market based on today's very-limited needs, because watches are on the decline, and smartwatches aren't that great.

     

    This is neither.

  • Reply 97 of 108
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismY View Post





    That sounds right to me. I failed to remember it properly earlier in this thread.



    So what would 1% of the watch market be for Apple? Are there more than 1 billion watches sold per year right now? Considering how cheap they are I wouldn't be surprised.

    Can a traditional mechanical (movement) watch and an electronic 'smart'watch be put in the same 'watch sales' category? Since the time of day can be sought and seen anywhere with just a turn of the head, nowadays there are many, many more watch wearers that currently use a watch primarily (or strictly) as jewelry. Those people would never even consider an Apple Watch.

  • Reply 98 of 108
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by aelegg View Post

     

     

    People are still taking a personal assistant (or whatever we should be calling it), and jamming it into a watch mindset.



    It's not a watch.  It's not a Smartwatch.  It will be a personal-assistant/intimate-communicator.



    It has nothing to do with your Casio, or someone's "Fit-Bit", or that iPad Nano watchband thing, etc etc.

     

    There's a new product category here.  Any attempt to compare it to today's products or today's needs misses the boat.

     

    This is a Henry Ford moment, "If I asked them what they wanted, they would've said 'Faster Horses' ".

     

    Android and all other smartwatches will piddle along as they have been.  Tiny market based on today's very-limited needs, because watches are on the decline, and smartwatches aren't that great.

     

    This is neither.


     

    If HF would have asked me that question in relation to the Apple Watch then I would have described something that is a fully functioning wearable. I'll wait for at least version 7. Until then I have absolutely no use for it.

     

    Watches are on the decline? Citation.

  • Reply 99 of 108
    Can a traditional mechanical (movement) watch and an electronic 'smart'watch be put in the same 'watch sales' category? Since the time of day can be sought and seen anywhere with just a turn of the head, nowadays there are many, many more watch wearers that currently use a watch primarily (or strictly) as jewelry. Those people would never even consider an Apple Watch.

    I'd guess this is up to the whomever does these categorizations, like the bodies that say the iPad doesn't count in the "PC" sales even as it was replacing the "PC" as many user's primary device.

    I can see it both ways, for the reasons you mention. Expensive watches are mostly a fashion statement, but Apple's product can be used that way as well, and Apple did file for the same jewelry category expensice watches are in, and are using precious metals and quality materials.

    And since one is likely to wear only a smartwatch or watch, not both, it could seen as being part of the overall category, like the iPad.

    I'm hopeful we'll see some announcements at the next event that helps put ?Watch into a similar longterm ownership club as collectible watches.
  • Reply 100 of 108
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by island hermit View Post

    Watches are on the decline? Citation.

     

    Just a general observation that I have not only read broadly, but seen myself.  I can't think of too many people here in the office, under the age of 30, that have wrist-watches. 



    Older managers and executives, from early generations, you see more wrist-watches.

     

    I think the apple watch is so much more, that it will not suffer from the above trend.

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