Samsung responds to iPhone 6 with premium metal & glass Galaxy S6, counters Apple Pay with Samsung P

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  • Reply 141 of 206
    9secondko9secondko Posts: 929member
    Lol

    people pay for iPhone. Because of the combination of leading OS PERFORMANCE, hardware specs, innovative features, SECURITY, privacy, and a very well laid out ecosystem.

    People gladly pay for iPhobe because it deserves it.

    No one wants expensive junk in a more expensive case.

    Android is meant to be cheap. All Google really should be free. They tried to make a premium laptop called the pixel. But no one wanted it. Now they try to say they meant to not sell very many (read: hardly any. At all).

    Swung makes good display screens. They still suck at implementing HDMI . And their washer dryers are decent. And their phones are some of the better android phones out there. But that's not saying much.

    They are a shameless company thst sells knockoffs unapologetically and their own security software layer has been proven woefully inadequate.

    Then they want people to trust them with their bank accounts? Can edit cards? Lol

    There's a reason Samsung took a dump this past year. And it has nothing to do with phon s not content metal and glass. Nor does it have to do with credit card payments.

    It has to do with them trying to be something that's not in their DNA.
  • Reply 142 of 206
    imatimat Posts: 213member
    Need I say more?
  • Reply 143 of 206
    paul94544paul94544 Posts: 1,027member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by 9secondko View Post



    Lol



    people pay for iPhone. Because of the combination of leading OS PERFORMANCE, hardware specs, innovative features, SECURITY, privacy, and a very well laid out ecosystem.



    People gladly pay for iPhobe because it deserves it.



    No one wants expensive junk in a more expensive case.



    Android is meant to be cheap. All Google really should be free. They tried to make a premium laptop called the pixel. But no one wanted it. Now they try to say they meant to not sell very many (read: hardly any. At all).



    Swung makes good display screens. They still suck at implementing HDMI . And their washer dryers are decent. And their phones are some of the better android phones out there. But that's not saying much.



    They are a shameless company thst sells knockoffs unapologetically and their own security software layer has been proven woefully inadequate.



    Then they want people to trust them with their bank accounts? Can edit cards? Lol



    There's a reason Samsung took a dump this past year. And it has nothing to do with phon s not content metal and glass. Nor does it have to do with credit card payments.



    It has to do with them trying to be something that's not in their DNA.

    The Samsung CEO is a indicted felon

     

    http://www.engadget.com/2008/04/17/samsung-ceo-charged-with-fraud-wont-be-arrested/

     

    he even admitted it. This  is why I won't buy anything made directly by Samsung. Though its  tough they supply a lot of the components for most electronics with their FAB 

  • Reply 144 of 206
    paul94544paul94544 Posts: 1,027member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

     

    Has nobody here ever swiped a chip/PIN card to see what happens?

     

    If you attempt to swipe a card that has a chip/PIN, and the terminal supports chip/PIN, then the terminal will immediately prompt you that swipe is not allowed and you MUST insert your chip. If the terminal is an older style WITHOUT chip/PIN, then you can still swipe a newer chip/PIN card.

     

    If you have a chip/PIN card number loaded into LoopPay, and you wave your Samsung phone in front of a newer terminal that supports chip/PIN, then the terminal will tell you to insert your card just as if you tried to swipe the actual card itself.

     

    LoopPay even mentions this on their website. When LoopPay updates their system to use tokens THEN you'll be able to use chip/PIN cards at chip/PIN terminals without getting told to insert your card.


    Add to this the fact that the LOOP PAY tokenization isn't "network tokenization" (like applePay is) Network tokens means that the phone device tokenizes the CC# then ONLY the receiving Bank decodes the token!  LoopPay decodes the token at the acquirer (in between the POS and the authorizing Bank. In this case that will be at any point in the network NOT  the Bank end point . So Google for instance will have access to all YOUR  customer data including the  credit card number, name , address zip code etc and more importantly your whereabout to the second!!!!!!  , Would you trust them them with all that? -  they WiLL sell that  purchase info to the highest bidder who will use it to spam you with  offers  and  track your buying and location habits. of course any hacker who  gains access to their system can get access to the PAN data! (AND YOU KNOW THAT WILL HAPPEN) and steal your identity ---  double oops! SAMSUNG can take their mobile  solution and stuff it where the sun don't shine !

  • Reply 145 of 206
    philboogiephilboogie Posts: 7,675member
    paul94544 wrote: »

    There are more stories covering the business tactics from Samsung, like this one from The Kernel, Aug 7th, 2012:
    Mic Wright wonders why Samsung isn’t more closely scrutinised, given the company’s chequered past and allegations made against its ruling family’s professional ethics.

    It’s never a good idea to accidentally give journalists access to your internal reports about them. If I were to write a book on PR best practice, that would certainly be on a page headed OH BOY, YOU DONE GOOFED.

    In 2007, after returning from a trip to Korea with Samsung, I got a peek at the company’s documents about the trip when, presumably, a PR person pressed the wrong button. I was working for Stuff and flew to Korea with a gaggle of British journalists and a stereotypical collection of continental hacks (seriously, the Germans wear suits all the time).

    It was an interesting trip. I saw the bizarre devices that get released in the South Korean market, got a taste for kimchi and visited more identical factories than I imagined could exist.

    Aside from the tech tourism, Samsung’s aim was to introduce the assorted tech press to its latest phone, the F700, a device now playing a central roll in the company’s legal battle with Apple. The iPhone had been shown off in public at this point but was not yet released and Samsung was desperately keen to show that it had the future of smartphones nailed.

    We were told early in the trip that mentioning Cupertino, Steve Jobs or the iPhone was a no-no. So, showing the due deference you can expect from the British press, we asked every executive wheeled out to lecture us what they thought about the iPhone and how Samsung intended to counter it.

    Koreans are an intensely polite people and the rictus grins didn’t crack but it was clear they were unhappy with our line of questioning. Why weren’t we bowled over by the F700? (We didn’t say: because it was about as responsive as a stoner in hour 40 of a Resident Evil marathon.)

    Reading the accidentally released PR report after the trip, I discovered that the home team at Samsung considered it to be a “major success” marred only by the “negative attitude of the British group who seemed to care only about getting back to the hotel bar which they colonised throughout the visit”.

    That, my South Korean friends, is what we call a lesson in cultural difference.

    Generally, gadgets have a mayfly-like lifespan, particularly for professional gadget reviewers who tire of new tech so quickly that it’s rumoured they contribute approximately 40 per cent of landfill with discarded LG phones and hideous iPod speaker docks.

    The F700, an faintly disappointing touchscreen device, has survived for longer, a symbol for Samsung that it was ahead of the iPhone curve and evidence for Apple that the South Korean design philosophy changed significantly after Cupertino uncovered its iOS device.

    An illustrated guide from the rather delightfully named Peanut Butter Egg Dirt shows just how the designs of the F700 and a Samsung tablet, the Q1 OLPC, were entirely different from the Samsung Galaxy range that emerged after the iPhone began to shift significant units. The F700 was a rectangular phone with rounded corners and a user interface predicated on simple blue icons.

    The Samsung Galaxy S, released in 2010, is a very different beast to the F700. It does not appear to come from the same design lineage at all. Instead, Apple alleges, it explicitly mimics the layout of the original iPhone, with silver edging, rounded corners and icons with the same layout and, in some cases, extremely similar designs.

    Apple’s case goes further suggesting that Samsung also copied its “trade dress”, i.e., the manner in which it presents its products and designs packaging. The visual guide certainly betrays signs of that to my eye.

    Now a memo from Samsung’s head of mobile communications, JK Shin, has been allowed as evidence in the trial and Apple’s claims have gained greater weight. In what is a very emotive message by Korean standards, Shin expresses his fears that Samsung has focused on fighting the wrong competitors:

    “Influential figures outside the company come across the iPhone and they point out that ‘Samsung is dozing off.’ All this time we’ve been paying all our attention to Nokia and concentrated our efforts on things like Folder, Bar, Slide.

    “Yet when our UX is compared to the unexpected competitor Apple’s iPhone, the difference is truly that of Heaven and Earth. It’s a crisis of design.”

    The memo appears to put pay to Samsung’s attempts to cast its Galaxy line as an organic development of its technology rather than an active attempt to create a take on the iPhone:

    “I hear things like this: Let’s make something like the iPhone… when everybody (both consumers and the industry talk about UX, they weigh it against the iPhone. The iPhone has become the standard.

    “That’s how things are already…do you know how difficult the [Samsung] Omnia is to use? When you compare the 2007 version of the iPhone with our current Omnia, can you honestly say the Omnia is better?”

    Sadly, design is not the only aspect of the sprawling Samsung organisation that is in crisis. In a paper published by the International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health in its Summer 2012 edition, Samsung is highlighted as one source of major health issues in the semiconductor industry.

    The study, “Leukaemia and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma in semiconductor industry workers in Korea”, says: “Samsung, the world’s largest information technology and electronics corporation (as measured by revenues), has refused to make public such data concerning the industrial processes that affect electronics workers and has impeded attempts by independent researchers to obtain essential information.”

    An editorial in the same issue notes Samsung’s stance against unions and top-down, highly-centralised approach to corporate governance:

    “[Samsung’s] long-standing policy prohibits union organising [and has] attracted critical attention. Samsung’s overall corporate structure centralises the policy-making that governs the activities of its vast network of subsidiary corporations.

    “This centralisation of decision making has received critical assessment even from investors concerned about Samsung Group’s overall corporate efficiency.”

    Samsung is a “chaebol” – one of the family-run conglomerates that dominate South Korean society. Almost Mafia-like in their obsessive secrecy and reach, chaebols have influence in most markets and industries in the country and wield huge political influence.

    They have also not been shy of using underhand methods to maintain their position. In 1997, South Korean journalist, Sang-ho Lee, obtained secretly recorded audiotapes of conversations between Haksoo Lee, the vice-chairman of the Samsung Group, and Seokhyun Hong, the Korean ambassador to the US and then publisher of the Joongang Daily, a major Korean newspaper affiliated with Samsung.

    The recordings were made by Korean’s secret intelligence agency, the NIS, itself implicated repeatedly in bribery, corruption and money-laundering.

    They revealed that Haksoo Lee and Hong were planning to deliver upwards of 3 billion won – around £2 million – to presidential candidates ahead of South Korea’s elections. Sang-ho Lee’s investigation, which became know as the “X-File”, had a significant impact.

    Hong resigned as ambassador and an official probe was launched into illegal funding of political parties by Samsung and the NIS’s illegal wiretapping operation. In an interview (PDF) with the Cardiff School of Journalism and Cultural Studies, Sang-Ho Lee speaks about the article’s effect:

    “People actually realised the power of capital after my report. Samsung owns Joongang Daily… it also has unprecedented power over journalism because it has the economic power to buy advertising space and time

    “It is hard to criticise Samsung as an individual journalist. It is considered insane.”

    Lee found himself under significant pressure. He says: “[Samsung] used the legal system to block me from reporting anything against them or anything that made them uncomfortable. It was a waste of time. I was branded a troublemaker because people think legal cases harmed my company’s reputation.”

    Yet Samsung seems capable enough of making trouble for itself. In 2008, the current Samsung chairman, Lee Kun-Hee, stepped down after his house and offices were raided and a police investigation began into claims that the corporation was maintaining a slush fund to bribe court officials and politicians.

    Found guilty of financial wrongdoing and tax evasion by Seoul Central District Court on July 16 2008, Lee Kun-Hee was in serious trouble. But despite prosecutors requesting that he be sentenced to seven years in prison and fined $347 million, the sentenced handed down was three years suspended and $109 million in fines.

    The South Korean Government pardoned Lee Kun-hee in 2009 to allow him to help with its successful bid to host the 2018 Winter Olympics. He is now a member of the International Olympic Committee and returned as Samsung’s Chairman in March 2010.

    Lee Kun-hee’s children hold key positions in the company. His son, Lee Jae-yong, is President and Chief Operating Officer of Samsung Electronics. Lee Boo-jin, his eldest daughter, is President and Chief Executive Officer of Hotel Shilla, a luxury hotel chain, and President of Samsung Everland, a theme park and resort operator that acts as de facto holding company for the entire conglomerate.

    Further branches of his family tree are inextricably tied to the business. His siblings and their children are executives at major Korean groups. One nephew is chairman of CJ Group, a holding company with interests in food, drink and entertainment.

    Another runs Saehan Media, one of Korea’s largest blank media producers, while his older sister owns Hansol Group, the company’s biggest paper manufacturer which also holds assets in electronics and communications. Another of his sisters is married to the former chairman of LG and his youngest sister heads up Shinsegae Group, the largest consumer retailer in Korea.

    All is not rosy in every part of the Lee dynasty. His older brothers, Lee Maeng-hee and Lee Sook-hee, began legal action against him in February of this year, claiming they are entitled to hundreds of millions of dollars worth of shares in Samsung companies left to them by their father.

    It’s clear that the issues with Samsung run deeper than those raised by its legal fight with Apple. Yet while Apple is frequently upbraided in the press for conditions at its Chinese manufacturing partners’ factories and the environmental sustainability of its products, Samsung’s travails receive very little Western press.

    As Apple’s only significant competitor in the tablet space – besides Google’s rather tasty Nexus 7 – and the only third party making real money from Android, Samsung should be more closely scrutinised.

    The idea that South Korea is a shiny futurescape of democratic wonder is ultimately the result of sitting next to the fetid, Communist disaster that is North Korea.

    The South looks better, thanks to the success consumer technology and semiconductors has brought, it but the grip of the chaebols is pernicious and corruption lies beneath every facet of Korean society.

    You’re welcome to love Android and hate Apple. Just don’t be fooled into thinking Samsung are the good guys.
  • Reply 146 of 206
    philboogiephilboogie Posts: 7,675member
    [VIDEO]
  • Reply 147 of 206
    19831983 Posts: 1,225member
    Hate to admit but despite Samsung copying a lot of ideas from Apple here, these are still very impressive smartphones. The first time I've ever said that for a Samsung phone product!
  • Reply 148 of 206
    disturbiadisturbia Posts: 563member

    :smokey: 

  • Reply 149 of 206
    thepixeldocthepixeldoc Posts: 2,257member
    While everyone here is making fun of S-Pay, it appears there's going to be an all-out assault against ?Pay form the Apple-haters including the media.

    Take a look at this headline this morning in the Guardian... even though it's completely false:

    [URL=http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2015/mar/02/apple-pay-mobile-payment-system-scammers?CMP=EMCNEWEML6619I2][B]Apple Pay: a new frontier for scammers[/B][/URL]

    Turns out that it's the banks that authorizing credit cards to the fraudsters.... but of course it"s "Apple's Fault" as always. The comments are downright hideous and from the uninformed and brainwashed. :no:

    TG referenced this blog as the "told-you-so" argument: [URL=http://www.droplabs.co/?p=1231]Rampant: Explaining the current state of Apple Pay Fraud[/URL]
  • Reply 150 of 206
    thepixeldocthepixeldoc Posts: 2,257member
    As to the S6: I've said in the past that I believe that Trademark Dress Patents will come to an end soon. This device proves it. Not worth even fighting at this point, consider it takes between 6 and 10 years to resolve in the courts.

    In fact I doubt Apple will ever see a penny of the judgement awarded them from the last trial against S******.

    (Self-censoring the profanity!)
  • Reply 151 of 206
    Sh**Sung Pay, Android Pay. Sure lets leave it up to the customers and confuse the markets and call it open with less standardization and let some merchants accept one and not the other. Great for the customers. I would take focus with less choices then options with ambiguity.
  • Reply 152 of 206
    Looks like a nice device. It is about time they raise the bar. Samsung still has to contend with the operating system and ecosystem which is why I am an iOS user.
  • Reply 153 of 206
    fallenjtfallenjt Posts: 4,056member
    jameskatt2 wrote: »
    Android fans are going to march on the streets in protest of the Samsung S6.

    1. The Samsung S6 has NO REPLACEABLE BATTERY.   Shocker.  Samsung just removed one of the advantages of Android Phones.

    2. The Samsung S6 has NO MICRO-SD SLOT.  Shocker.  Samsung just removed an advantage of Android Phone to expand storage.

    3. The Samsung S6 has a SMALLER SCREEN than the iPhone 6 Plus.  Shocker.  Smaller is not better on Android phones.

    4. The Samsung S6 has NO WATERPROOFING. Shocker. 

    5. Samsung touts how they REMOVED SOFTWARE 40 FEATURES that were in the S5 when making the S6.  Shocker.  

    Android Fans are going to throw a FIT.
    In fact, fandroids have been complaining like bitches in android centrals and other blods...lol. At least the can use e-pay now with similar steps as in Apple Pay except 2 extra steps: unlock the phone and launch Sansung Pay.
  • Reply 154 of 206
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Durandal1707 View Post





    Not really, they'll just buy something else.



     

     

    No, they'll buy the Samsung anyway. The only reason they whine online about SD cards and batteries is because the iPhone lacks them. It gives them another check mark on their "dealbreaker must have feature lists".

     

    Then they'll turn around and lie online they bought something else besides the S6 so they won't look like hypocrites.

  • Reply 155 of 206
    phalanxphalanx Posts: 109member

    The wonderful thing in the Android world is that this is just one of the choices for a phone.  If you don't like it you can get one with a removable battery and MicroSD card.  There is significant variety.   All your apps stay with you.    Just saying.   :p

  • Reply 156 of 206
    rob bonnerrob bonner Posts: 237member
    Love this:

    By listening to our customers, and learning from both our success and missteps

    Really they just watch Apple listen to their customers, cuts out the middle man for sure.
  • Reply 157 of 206
    tmaytmay Posts: 6,441member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Carthusia View Post

     



    Yes. By this account, it would appear the Nokia phone evidences positional but not the curvature continuity of iPhone 6/6+.


    The Ive interview (New Yorker?) stated that Jony was giving Master Classes to the Architects of the new Apple Headquarters; the floors will have a bit of an upturn at the intersection to the walls, perhaps a G3 curve,  I suppose to draw the eye up rather than into a corner.

     

    If Jony did nothing in his life but place industrial design front and center in the consumer space so that billions of consumers had access to it, and set the standard for competitors and many other industries outside the consumer space, I think that would be enough for a lifetime. Dieter Rams is probably very happy with this, and Steve would be extremely pleased as well. 

     

    Kudos to Samsung not so much for its design of the S6, which is certainly a benchmark for them, but for saying "no" to features that reduce the experience.

     

    Perhaps this will slow the drop in profitability for Samsung, but it won't change the overall race to the bottom for Android; that can't be stopped.

  • Reply 158 of 206
    adonissmuadonissmu Posts: 1,776member

    Wow at Samsung blatantly ripping off Apple's designs yet again. 

  • Reply 159 of 206
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member
    tmay wrote: »
    The Ive interview (New Yorker?) stated that Jony was giving Master Classes to the Architects of the new Apple Headquarters; the floors will have a bit of an upturn at the intersection to the walls, perhaps a G3 curve,  I suppose to draw the eye up rather than into a corner.

    If Jony did nothing in his life but place industrial design front and center in the consumer space so that billions of consumers had access to it, and set the standard for competitors and many other industries outside the consumer space, I think that would be enough for a lifetime. Dieter Rams is probably very happy with this, and Steve would be extremely pleased as well. 

    Kudos to Samsung not so much for its design of the S6, which is certainly a benchmark for them, but for saying "no" to features that reduce the experience.

    Perhaps this will slow the drop in profitability for Samsung, but it won't change the overall race to the bottom for Android; that can't be stopped.

    Kudos to Samsung for limiting the features they spinelessly steal to those found in the iPhone?
  • Reply 160 of 206
    jbdragonjbdragon Posts: 2,311member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by TheWhiteFalcon View Post

     



    Actually it's more expensive than the iPhone now.

     

    SPay will be a failure, let's get that out right now. It's garbage.

     

    These will sell, of course, but not amazingly. They're still loaded with CheesyWiz, they've irritated the Fandroids by dropping MicroSD and removable batteries, and people are tiring of Samsung and Android in general.


     

    The problem with SPay is, it's NOT Google!!!  Why would a Android user use SPay over Google Wallet?  Samsung keeps trying to offer their over services and they fail because few want to use them over Google's.   The whole MicroSD and Battery thing is also a problem.  How do fandroids expect to bash Apple users over with those features that few people even used???  

     

    Does Samsung ever have a original thought or do they just keep repeating the exact same thing Apple does every year?   I know it's worked for them to be #1 with Android, but come on.

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