Apple Watch battery life reportedly 'much better' than anticipated thanks to power saving features

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  • Reply 41 of 97
    mac_128mac_128 Posts: 3,454member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by NolaMacGuy View Post





    Why wouldn't you have your phone with you on the way to that big important meeting?



    why wouldn't you have your watch on you for a big important meeting. seems like the whole point of the watch is so you don't have to put your phone on the table and can get notifications at an inconspicuous glance. the point is, I've run out the door numerous times forgetting phones, keys, wallet, etc. 

  • Reply 42 of 97
    nasserae wrote: »
    mac_128 wrote: »
     
    So while your watch is charging at the office, or on your bedside table, no notifications. An no notifications, until you re-authenticate it with your iPhone, so no grabbing it off the charger as you rush to a meeting.  


    Where did you read "re-authorize"? It simply says it will only receives notifications when you wear it. So yes, you can grab it off the charger as you rush to a meeting.

    Some time ago (when Apple Pay was announced) it was mentioned that the ?Watch needs to paired/authorized with the iPhone when placed back on the wrist. This is to prevent someone stealing your watch and making payments.

    Also, there's no loss if your ?Watch is not receiving/relaying notifications while it is on the charger because your iPhone will still be doing so. I don't believe the Watch is storing anything relating to notification; it is merely relaying them from the iPhone.
  • Reply 43 of 97
    mac_128mac_128 Posts: 3,454member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dugbug View Post





    Apple pay is optional and requires a pin to unlock each time you put the watch on. That does not mean all features are pin locked



    I concede that. But I also maintain, I would not want anyone to be able to, by merely strapping my watch onto their wrist, to intercept all of my notifications from my iPhone, much less be able to respond to them. I accept that this may be an optional setting, just like touch ID and pin codes are optional on the iPhone. But I also don't know anyone who doesn't use them. My guess is the default settings on the ?Watch will be to disable notifications upon removal from your wrist, and must be re-authenitcated via some secure method. 

     

    But who knows. Maybe nobody at Apple has sensitive personal messages they wouldn't want anyone else to know about.

  • Reply 44 of 97
    mac_128mac_128 Posts: 3,454member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post





    Ok there might be certain professions or instances where the watch will need to be charged on the job. Are there going to be that many instances where someone will have no time to re-authenticate the watch? 

    ER Docs don't even have time to eat or go to the bathroom sometimes. A patient comes in and your watch is on the charger and you may not get back to it for the rest of the shift. A fireman might have similar emergency. So there's one tool they will do without. And there are many other professionals for whom their occupations won't wait for them. My job isn't nearly so urgent, or demanding, but I often leave my office quickly, get caught out and don't have time to run back for whatever I forgot.

     

    This may be worst case scenario time, but the reality is, having to charge the watch for two hours to top it off, at least once a day, with no guarantee that it will last throughout the day is not a very convenient wearable. 

  • Reply 45 of 97
    mrboba1mrboba1 Posts: 276member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Mac_128 View Post

     

    ER Docs don't even have time to eat or go to the bathroom sometimes. A patient comes in and your watch is on the charger and you may not get back to it for the rest of the shift. A fireman might have similar emergency. So there's one tool they will do without. And there are many other professionals for whom their occupations won't wait for them. My job isn't nearly so urgent, or demanding, but I often leave my office quickly, get caught out and don't have time to run back for whatever I forgot.

     

    This may be worst case scenario time, but the reality is, having to charge the watch for two hours to top it off, at least once a day, with no guarantee that it will last throughout the day is not a very convenient wearable. 




    I'd question why a firefighter would be wearing a non-waterproof watch. If there are "many other professionals" that are under such urgent and stringent schedules, they probably aren't using their watches or phones enough to drain the batteries enough to worry about it.

     

    You know what people are good for? Acclimating to their circumstances, and I think they would do so to take best advantage of the technology provided them.

  • Reply 46 of 97
    rp2011rp2011 Posts: 159member
    I'm hoping there is a find my watch option. Whereas your phone is not always visible on display, this sucker will be at the very least teasing purse and phone snatchers to open their horizons
  • Reply 47 of 97
    solipsismysolipsismy Posts: 5,099member
    rp2011 wrote: »
    I'm hoping there is a find my watch option. Whereas your phone is not always visible on display, this sucker will be at the very least teasing purse and phone snatchers to open their horizons

    If there is I would expect it to be very limited because the only wireless signaling that can be used are BT-based. So you either misplaced it within the BT range which you can hit a button on your iPhone and maybe it will make a sound on ?Watch (but don't recall a speaker), or essentially give you a hotter/colder status as the signal gets stronger/weaker.

    Other than that perhaps iPhone can record the location your iPhone was in when you took it off your wrist and when it became disconnected from your iPhone's BT connection, just like the Automatic app does for my car.

    I can't think of any other way this could work, and none of those seem that useful so my guess is they won't include any such feature.
  • Reply 48 of 97
    iaeeniaeen Posts: 588member
    mac_128 wrote: »

    I concede that. But I also maintain, I would not want anyone to be able to, by merely strapping my watch onto their wrist, to intercept all of my notifications from my iPhone, much less be able to respond to them. I accept that this may be an optional setting, just like touch ID and pin codes are optional on the iPhone. But I also don't know anyone who doesn't use them. My guess is the default settings on the ?Watch will be to disable notifications upon removal from your wrist, and must be re-authenitcated via some secure method. 

    But who knows. Maybe nobody at Apple has sensitive personal messages they wouldn't want anyone else to know about.

    I've owned watches before, and I've never had anyone randomly take them and strap them on (partly because they were always strapped to my wrist, but mostly because that would just be a weird thing for someone to do). Even if it did happen, it's hard to believe it could happen without my knowing and putting a stop to it.
    mac_128 wrote: »
    ER Docs don't even have time to eat or go to the bathroom sometimes. A patient comes in and your watch is on the charger and you may not get back to it for the rest of the shift. A fireman might have similar emergency. So there's one tool they will do without. And there are many other professionals for whom their occupations won't wait for them. My job isn't nearly so urgent, or demanding, but I often leave my office quickly, get caught out and don't have time to run back for whatever I forgot.

    This may be worst case scenario time, but the reality is, having to charge the watch for two hours to top it off, at least once a day, with no guarantee that it will last throughout the day is not a very convenient wearable. 

    What is with this bazaro troll world where everyone has time to **** around with their watch enough to run the battery down, but once they do that they are suddenly too busy to charge it or even eat or go to the bathroom?
  • Reply 49 of 97
    bigpicsbigpics Posts: 1,397member
    Quote:

     the UI does not include a keyboard




    What...?!?



    That's it.  I'm not buying....  

     

    :no:  ;) 

  • Reply 50 of 97
    nasseraenasserae Posts: 3,167member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post





    Some time ago (when Apple Pay was announced) it was mentioned that the ?Watch needs to paired/authorized with the iPhone when placed back on the wrist. This is to prevent someone stealing your watch and making payments.



    Also, there's no loss if your ?Watch is not receiving/relaying notifications while it is on the charger because your iPhone will still be doing so. I don't believe the Watch is storing anything relating to notification; it is merely relaying them from the iPhone.

     

    That was specifc for ?Pay usage. Since the watch does not have Touch ID it needs to be authorized for ?Pay every time it is put on the wrist. How this will work exactly is not known yet. It could be a PIN or simply using NFC on the iPhone and Watch.

     

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Mac_128 View Post

     



    I concede that. But I also maintain, I would not want anyone to be able to, by merely strapping my watch onto their wrist, to intercept all of my notifications from my iPhone, much less be able to respond to them. I accept that this may be an optional setting, just like touch ID and pin codes are optional on the iPhone. But I also don't know anyone who doesn't use them. My guess is the default settings on the ?Watch will be to disable notifications upon removal from your wrist, and must be re-authenitcated via some secure method. 

     

    But who knows. Maybe nobody at Apple has sensitive personal messages they wouldn't want anyone else to know about.


     

    It seems to receive notification you need to have the paired iPhone within Bluetooth range. So without taking the iPhone with them (or following you where you go) they cannot intercept your messages by just strapping it onto their wrist and walking away. We really don't know much about the security of the ?Watch. We don't know all the details yet but for all we know it could have more security option.

  • Reply 51 of 97
    solipsismysolipsismy Posts: 5,099member
    bigpics wrote: »

    What...?!?


    That's it.  I'm not buying....  

    :no:   ;)  

    Maybe Blackberry will come out with a smartwatch that's more your taste. :D


    1000
  • Reply 52 of 97
    dacloodacloo Posts: 890member
    It'll sell like crazy but looks like an unnecessary product to me.
  • Reply 53 of 97
    The problem with the Apple Watch is those of us who wear water-resistant watches, shower with them, swim with them and change the battery once every two years, will not be happy with the Apple Watch.
  • Reply 54 of 97
    The problem with the Apple Watch is those of us who wear water-resistant watches, shower with them, swim with them and change the battery once every two years, will not be happy with the Apple Watch.

    I have a watch that can do almost all of the above, except for the fact it's solar so I don't deal with batteries, and I'd be fine with the AppleWatch. I mean, a Nokia candybar phone would probably be tougher and have better battery life than my iPhone, but I'll take the iPhone every time.
  • Reply 55 of 97
    solipsismysolipsismy Posts: 5,099member
    The problem with the Apple Watch is those of us who wear water-resistant watches, shower with them, swim with them and change the battery once every two years, will not be happy with the Apple Watch.

    Your argument isn't unlike back in 2007 when people said: "The problem with the [iPhone] is those of us who [type one phones, use T9, don't have to look at our phones to accurately reply to SMS], will not be happy with the [iPhone]," -or- "The problem with the [cell phone] is those of us who [like a phone with no dead spots that never needs to be charged, and great voice quality], will not be happy with the [cell phone].[/quote]

    It's not that your point isn't valid within a particular scope, but rather that if the utility is good enough it's easy for us to adopt a new perspective as to what is the most ideal solution.

    Now it's hard to beat the utility of a watch battery that last years or a watch that has no battery, but are you really going to wait until a smartwatch can last as long between charges before you considering making a purchase? I don't think so.

    Sure, I wish all my CE would go years before charges but it's ridiculous for me to instead use a manual typewriter or paper and pen, when my MBP offers me so much more despite needing to be charged daily.

    We'll have to weigh the pros and cons when the time comes, just as many Blackberry owners that laughed at the iPhone are surely now using a modern smartphone design pushed forward by Apple. Battery life of CE has always been an issue compared to simpler alternatives, but it's rarely been a deal breaker. Frankly, I think CE that is also competing with jewelry will be a much bigger hurdle for Apple to tackle, and hope we get some idea as to how they plan to make this work years down the road.
  • Reply 56 of 97
    solipsismysolipsismy Posts: 5,099member
    Some time ago (when Apple Pay was announced) it was mentioned that the ?Watch needs to paired/authorized with the iPhone when placed back on the wrist. This is to prevent someone stealing your watch and making payments.

    Also, there's no loss if your ?Watch is not receiving/relaying notifications while it is on the charger because your iPhone will still be doing so. I don't believe the Watch is storing anything relating to notification; it is merely relaying them from the iPhone.

    And if your ?Watch is receiving notifications off your wrist then it also means your iPhone is within BT range. This might be one of those things that needs actual usage to figure what is the best way to set this up. Perhaps they will give us an option.
  • Reply 57 of 97
    The problem with the Apple Watch is those of us who wear water-resistant watches, shower with them, swim with them and change the battery once every two years, will not be happy with the Apple Watch.
    I wear a Casio g shock with temp and altitude and all that, but I would never wear it in the shower and I live by the ocean and take off my watch during swimming and in a pool, can it handle the water sure but it feels awkward to swim with it and just wear it in water . So I think I could be happy with it , because it does so much more then just being water resistant . I'm not even wearing it now but I have my phone near by . I'm interested in the health features and using Siri to send a quick text or reply and just as a watch .
  • Reply 58 of 97
    jungmarkjungmark Posts: 6,926member
    mac_128 wrote: »
    ER Docs don't even have time to eat or go to the bathroom sometimes. A patient comes in and your watch is on the charger and you may not get back to it for the rest of the shift. A fireman might have similar emergency. So there's one tool they will do without. And there are many other professionals for whom their occupations won't wait for them. My job isn't nearly so urgent, or demanding, but I often leave my office quickly, get caught out and don't have time to run back for whatever I forgot.

    This may be worst case scenario time, but the reality is, having to charge the watch for two hours to top it off, at least once a day, with no guarantee that it will last throughout the day is not a very convenient wearable. 

    If you're working on a patient or fighting a fire, chances are you're not looking at your phone anyways.

    Why aren't you charging it at home?
  • Reply 59 of 97
    neilmneilm Posts: 984member

       

  • Reply 60 of 97
    neilmneilm Posts: 984member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Mac_128 View Post

    He may have brilliant industrial design sensibilities, but get a load of those bright red socks.

     


     

    I wonder what you guys criticizing Jony Ive's socks are wearing that's so f-ing stylish. Probably unwashed shorts and sports team shirts for games you don't play.

     

    Me, I like the red socks: the guy's not afraid to make a statement when wearing a suit. Others would do that with a tie, but they don't wear ties in tech.

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