Apple Watch battery life reportedly 'much better' than anticipated thanks to power saving features

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  • Reply 61 of 97
    nolamacguynolamacguy Posts: 4,758member
    mac_128 wrote: »

    why wouldn't you have your watch on you for a big important meeting. seems like the whole point of the watch is so you don't have to put your phone on the table and can get notifications at an inconspicuous glance. the point is, I've run out the door numerous times forgetting phones, keys, wallet, etc. 

    if you've forgotten your phone inside then no, you're not going to get notifications. how is that a failing of the device? seriously, get real...
  • Reply 62 of 97
    nolamacguynolamacguy Posts: 4,758member
    mac_128 wrote: »

    I concede that. But I also maintain, I would not want anyone to be able to, by merely strapping my watch onto their wrist, to intercept all of my notifications from my iPhone, much less be able to respond to them. I accept that this may be an optional setting, just like touch ID and pin codes are optional on the iPhone. But I also don't know anyone who doesn't use them. My guess is the default settings on the ?Watch will be to disable notifications upon removal from your wrist, and must be re-authenitcated via some secure method. 

    But who knows. Maybe nobody at Apple has sensitive personal messages they wouldn't want anyone else to know about.

    the basis of your complaint is 1) someone could steal your watch from the charging stand, and 2) this theif is close enough to you to stay within Bluetooth range and intercept your alerts.

    that is the most asinine complaint I've ever seen about the watch. you are obviously really, really trying very hard to not like something. again.
  • Reply 63 of 97
    nolamacguynolamacguy Posts: 4,758member
    mac_128 wrote: »
    ER Docs don't even have time to eat or go to the bathroom sometimes. A patient comes in and your watch is on the charger and you may not get back to it for the rest of the shift. A fireman might have similar emergency. So there's one tool they will do without. And there are many other professionals for whom their occupations won't wait for them. My job isn't nearly so urgent, or demanding, but I often leave my office quickly, get caught out and don't have time to run back for whatever I forgot.

    This may be worst case scenario time, but the reality is, having to charge the watch for two hours to top it off, at least once a day, with no guarantee that it will last throughout the day is not a very convenient wearable. 

    ER docs aren't wearing devices to surgery. you know that, right?

    as for no guarantee that it lasts all day -- the press is saying it does. Apple says it does. the only one saying it might not is....you. hmm.
  • Reply 64 of 97
    nolamacguynolamacguy Posts: 4,758member
    dacloo wrote: »
    It'll sell like crazy but looks like an unnecessary product to me.

    insightful analysis. thank you.
  • Reply 65 of 97
    solipsismysolipsismy Posts: 5,099member
    Spitballing...

    I love when new tech helps bring back some old tech we thought was otherwise gone.

    I wonder how useful it would be to have the haptic motor send Morse code to users. Perhaps this app could be limited to Twitter sized (or smaller statements) per message. You can either write and read them out, but its main purpose could be to have no visual notification on your wrist but then through a serious of long and short vibrations rely messages you can then interpret without ever having to look at your wrist.

    Perhaps the motion sensor is sensitive enough that you could also dictate a message without having to actively look (to type) or dictate your iPhone or ?Watch. If not through the motion sensors, you could [I]at least[/I] open up the app to then tap away in Morse code.
  • Reply 66 of 97
    nolamacguynolamacguy Posts: 4,758member
    The problem with the Apple Watch is those of us who wear water-resistant watches, shower with them, swim with them and change the battery once every two years, will not be happy with the Apple Watch.

    this is true, you can't swim with this product. I guess they should just shut down the company and return the money to the shareholders.
  • Reply 67 of 97
    pistispistis Posts: 247member
    The standard of coherent discussion, grammar, punctuation etc. has reached a new low in this thread. The trolls are out in force as are the whining babies too. It's a sad day
  • Reply 68 of 97
    retrogustoretrogusto Posts: 1,102member

    When you boil it down, the watch seems to serve two primary functional categories: it allows you to not take your phone out of your pocket (facilitates things that you could do with your phone anyway), and it does some body-related monitoring (which your phone can't do because it's not strapped to your wrist). If the battery were to die mid-day, you could still do everything in the former category (e.g. check the time on your phone), but not the latter. So it seems like you should be able to configure it to automatically cut down on the stuff that you can do with your phone anyway if you need to conserve battery power, especially if those things use a lot.

     

    As for charging during the day, most of the people who I know who charge their phones during the day either forgot to charge it the night before (or they don't have iPhones).

  • Reply 69 of 97
    eightzeroeightzero Posts: 3,040member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by rp2011 View Post



    I'm hoping there is a find my watch option. Whereas your phone is not always visible on display, this sucker will be at the very least teasing purse and phone snatchers to open their horizons



    I am kind of curious about this too. Apple Watch has wifi, so it can theoretically be contacted and found. 

     

    Back to the point of the article, one thing that will come in the few weeks after Apple ships will be reports of bad battery life...because people will be diddling with the things continuously. Once we get its functions sorted out, and decide how we are going to use them, suddenly battery life will improve...because we stopped fiddling with it continuously. Biggest battery drain by far is going to be lighting up the screen.

     

    TechCrunch reported a 2 hour period to recharge Apple Watch completely. This surprises me, and I hope it is much less than that.

  • Reply 70 of 97
    solipsismysolipsismy Posts: 5,099member
    eightzero wrote: »

    I am kind of curious about this too. Apple Watch has wifi, so it can theoretically be contacted and found.

    It has WiFi for the high-speed BT connection. I don't think ?Watch will be able to hop onto various WiFI hotspots so it can let you know where it is.

    - - -

    Although, I do have an alternative option (but I doubt Apple would implement it). Do you remember Tile?

    While their solution is nice, it's inherently flawed because without massive support Tile is virtually useless. And I don't see Tile gaining massive support without first being nearly ubiquitous out of the gate. This is a Catch-22 for many a brilliant idea.

    Anyway, there are a huge number of iPhones in the world. ?Watch could send out a periodic, low-energy distress single whenever it's not connected to a wrist, not authenticated, -and- when it senses certain motion (this way it's not doing it because you put it on its charger on your nightstand). This could then be automatically picked up by any iPhone with iOS 8.2 (or newer) that has BT enabled.

    If you've sent a Find My ?Watch request from iCloud it would then let you know when the "pings" are picked up and then use that particular and anonymized iPhone's location as the ?Watch's location.

    Not exactly a fool proof plan (which is why I think Apple won't use it) but it does offer some benefit and I would assume it wouldn't be hard for Apple to code.
  • Reply 71 of 97
    mac_128mac_128 Posts: 3,454member
    iaeen wrote: »
    I've owned watches before, and I've never had anyone randomly take them and strap them on (partly because they were always strapped to my wrist, but mostly because that would just be a weird thing for someone to do).
    You've never owned a watch that allowed people to see your personal communications, nor respond to them remotely. Will you be able to put a stop to someone doing this while you're asleep? While you're in a meeting and left your watch on its charger? We're not talking about people randomly strapping it on anyway, we're talking about someone intentionally strapping it on to see what you're up to.

    As to how a battery can run down, well, we don't know exactly how the thing works yet, but enough has been said that suggests a user doesn't even need to interact with the watch to run the battery down -- the fact that the power saving mode limits some notifications user might want, indicates that a person who gets a lot of emails and texts all day long my run the battery down just with their daily notifications, perhaps without even responding to them. I would further expect some professionals to rely on their watches to do their jobs ... Timing things is pretty typical, but if this watch has all then maxing apps they suggest then it might become invaluable for certain tasks a person performs in the course of doing their job.
  • Reply 72 of 97
    mac_128mac_128 Posts: 3,454member
    nolamacguy wrote: »
    ER docs aren't wearing devices to surgery. you know that, right?.
    Er docs don't perform surgery, you know that right?
  • Reply 73 of 97
    friedmudfriedmud Posts: 165member
    This.
    solipsismy wrote: »
    It's not that your point isn't valid within a particular scope, but rather that if the utility is good enough it's easy for us to adopt a new perspective as to what is the most ideal solution.

    Now it's hard to beat the utility of a watch battery that last years or a watch that has no battery, but are you really going to wait until a smartwatch can last as long between charges before you considering making a purchase? I don't think so.

    Sure, I wish all my CE would go years before charges but it's ridiculous for me to instead use a manual typewriter or paper and pen, when my MBP offers me so much more despite needing to be charged daily.

    We'll have to weigh the pros and cons when the time comes, just as many Blackberry owners that laughed at the iPhone are surely now using a modern smartphone design pushed forward by Apple. Battery life of CE has always been an issue compared to simpler alternatives, but it's rarely been a deal breaker. Frankly, I think CE that is also competing with jewelry will be a much bigger hurdle for Apple to tackle, and hope we get some idea as to how they plan to make this work years down the road.
  • Reply 74 of 97
    friedmudfriedmud Posts: 165member
    mac_128 wrote: »
    You've never owned a watch that allowed people to see your personal communications, nor respond to them remotely. Will you be able to put a stop to someone doing this while you're asleep? While you're in a meeting and left your watch on its charger? We're not talking about people randomly strapping it on anyway, we're talking about someone intentionally strapping it on to see what you're up to.

    Man. Do you seriously have this many enemies? And you let them hang around you while you sleep?

    If so, maybe you need to take a look at your life and change your situation! No one should have to live with that much fear and paranoia!
  • Reply 75 of 97
    mnbob1mnbob1 Posts: 269member
    mac_128 wrote: »

    Well, ?Pay will no longer function once the watch is taken off your wrist without re-authentication. Now while it's possible that feature can be disabled for notifications, do you really want just anybody to be able to receive your private notifications remotely just by strapping it onto their wrist?

    Unless there's a built-in DNA reader, if the watch doesn't lock out the iPhone when removed from the wrist, then anyone can put it on and access all your data without some kind of "touch-ID" passcode re-authentication. We'll have to wait until Monday to see how cumbersome that may or may not be.
    You're speculating on something that we don't have knowledge of yet. Bluetooth 4 low power can be set to delink between the two devices when they are both awake and close to each other. I have a two different Bluetooth gluco meters that sync in this way. The meter will only sync with the phone that I paired it with unless I delete the Bluetooth connection on the phone. The FDA is pretty strict about privacy and connecting to the phone. I don't think it will be that difficult for Apple to handle a secure connection for the Watch.
  • Reply 76 of 97
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member
    How dare Jony Ive not conform to status quo I'm gonna rage quit Apple¡

    B...b...but...HE'S NOT WEARING SOCKS... ????
  • Reply 77 of 97
    eightzeroeightzero Posts: 3,040member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismY View Post





    It has WiFi for the high-speed BT connection. I don't think ?Watch will be able to hop onto various WiFI hotspots so it can let you know where it is.



    Although, I do have an alternative option (but I doubt Apple would implement it). Do you remember Tile?
    While their solution is nice, it's inherently flawed because without massive support Tile is virtually useless. And I don't see Tile gaining massive support without first being useless out of the gate. This is a Catch-22 for many a brilliant idea. Anyway, there are a huge number of iPhones in the world. ?Watch could send out a periodic, low-energy distress single whenever it's not connected to a wrist, not authenticated, and when it senses motion. This could then be automatically picked up by any iPhone with with iOS 8.2 (or newer) that has BT enabled.



    If you've sent a Find My ?Watch request from iCloud it would then let you know when the "pings" are picked up and then use that particular and anonymized iPhone's location as the ?Watch's location.



    Not exactly a fool proof plan (which is why I think Apple won't use it) but it does offer some benefit and I would assume it wouldn't be hard for Apple to code.



    Concur. But this is just the kind of thing Apple likes to take on. It is actually about the only "Internet of Things" idea that (to me) has any practicality.

     

    Apple might be able to make use of a unique identifier in Apple Watch (the serial number?) to simply report its pairing. Opt-in when your buy/register the device, allowing you to later report a theft or loss. Next time it pairs with an iPhone...tink.

  • Reply 78 of 97
    solipsismysolipsismy Posts: 5,099member
    eightzero wrote: »
    Apple might be able to make use of a unique identifier in Apple Watch (the serial number?) to simply report its pairing. Opt-in when your buy/register the device, allowing you to later report a theft or loss. Next time it pairs with an iPhone...tink.

    I like your idea better. That basically sounds like activation lock for ?Watch. The downside I see if that the SIP can be replaced and it's the other components that make up the real expense and resale value of the device.
  • Reply 79 of 97
    mac_128mac_128 Posts: 3,454member
    friedmud wrote: »
    Do you seriously have this many enemies?
    Well first I can speculate about such things on behalf of others without it being true for myself... Second I don't want this particular scenario happening either:

    "Daddy why is mommy texting naked pictures of herself?", and "what does Uncle Fred mean by F*ck?"
  • Reply 80 of 97
    mac_128mac_128 Posts: 3,454member
    mnbob1 wrote: »
    The meter will only sync with the phone that I paired it with unless I delete the Bluetooth connection on the phone.
    Not my point. I'm not talking about stealing the watch and using it with some other phone. I'm talking about how the phone authenticates or not with the paired phone, potentially allowing others to see and respond to notifications via the watch when it's off my wrist. And of course I'm speculating. We're all speculating about everything. Even Monday is not likely to clear everything up.
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