Hands on: iPad Pro with Apple Pencil

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  • Reply 181 of 247
    diegog wrote: »
    Yes. I use a stylus quite often. And I still do a lot with pencils and erasers. Granted I use a malleable gum eraser mostly so I never "flip" a pencil to erase anything. Haven't for years. Selecting the erase tool is no different than changing the color or thickness, etc. it's not a pencil regardless of its name. It's a pointing implement with 'options'. While I'm sure it would be a nice option to be able to flip it I would guess that the amount of people that are stuck in that habit were too few to warrant the inclusion of that feature. As noted previously...it's not like apple is just guessing or throwing darts at a wall when it comes to design.

    I'm sure they're not. And I can't wait to get my hands on one of those Apple pencils. the omission of the eraser top is just a minor point, I suppose. And habits can change :)
  • Reply 182 of 247
    haggarhaggar Posts: 1,568member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post



    "Microsoft can't explain why its Surface tablet needs a pen,"

     

    ...

     

    Jobs remarked that phones relying on a stylus were a sign of a failed design.


     

    I guess that first statement must be a good thing.

  • Reply 183 of 247
    tjwolf wrote: »
    Does anyone know whether Apple has included a storage location for the pencil? Looking at the iPad Pro pictures, I don't see one. On the foldable keyboard accessory perhaps? Would be a shame to lose a $100 "pencil" :-(
  • Reply 184 of 247
    Agreed, the one unanswered question, where do you store it? I was half expecting some neat way to store it but alas not. Surely there must be a storage spot unless they think it's not going to be a mobile device and used primarily in the office?
  • Reply 185 of 247
    ignomini wrote: »
    What about handwriting recognition? For those of us who never learned to touch type, adding recognition to the notes app would have been a big deal. I'm not artistic enough to have any other use for the pen.

    You can't touch type on an iPad anyway (unless you buy a physical keyboard).
  • Reply 186 of 247
    gumbi wrote: »
     I doubt it has anything to do with licensing terms.  It's probably the same reason that MS switched away from Wacom for there surface line - the way Wacom digitizers work causes you to have a thicker display layer and therefore a thicker device.  Also, a bit more parallax effect because of it.  ?

    I imagine it is about reducing parallax (can't be totally eliminated) and most importantly saving on weight and thickness.  Also, the only really cool feature that the pencil has is the tilt control, that isn't really a thing with a Wacom type stylus.

    Of course Wacom styli and tablets have tilt sensitivity. Wacom has everything that, and more than, any competitor product has.
  • Reply 187 of 247
    haggarhaggar Posts: 1,568member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismY View Post





    Not being in a career that can really utilize that tech I'm only familiar with Wacom's wares and what they've done in broad strokes, but I look forward to seeing how the reviews come in. I agree that in-and-of-itself Pencil being powered and needing BT isn't as good, but what if that powered Pencil means there is an accelerometer for detecting angled strokes and if that means it can more accurately gauge where elements are on the screen. Wouldn't it then be worthwhile?



    Higher end Wacom tablets are both pressure and tilt sensitive, all without requiring a powered stylus.  Whether Apple Pencils's powered implementation provides more accuracy would require visibility into the technical specs - the same specs to which Apple fans tend to say "so what" whenever Apple products are compared to non-Apple products.

  • Reply 188 of 247
    diegog wrote: »
    You aren't required to plug it in to the iPad. It will have a charging cable.
    Additionally, why does it 'require' an 'eraser'? Its not an actual pencil. Requiring someone to flip the pencil around in order to use it like a traditional eraser is absurd. Just change the selection tool to eraser mode and boom....eraser.

    Obviously you're not an artist that uses styli. It's FAR more efficient to flip the stylus than to change the tool settings. Regardless of the GUI, an eraser on the opposite end of the stylus is always the superior solution. There's far less latency in getting done what you want when all you have to do is flip your stylus.
  • Reply 189 of 247
    diegog wrote: »
    Yes. I use a stylus quite often. And I still do a lot with pencils and erasers. Granted I use a malleable gum eraser mostly so I never "flip" a pencil to erase anything. Haven't for years. Selecting the erase tool is no different than changing the color or thickness, etc. it's not a pencil regardless of its name. It's a pointing implement with 'options'. While I'm sure it would be a nice option to be able to flip it I would guess that the amount of people that are stuck in that habit were too few to warrant the inclusion of that feature. As noted previously...it's not like apple is just guessing or throwing darts at a wall when it comes to design.

    Sorry, you DO have experience. I retract my statement otherwise. I do NOT retract my statement of efficiency with a reversible stylus. I'm not properly ambidextrous, so using an eraser in my left hand has never been a thing I've felt comfortable doing.
  • Reply 190 of 247
    Anyone find any info on the number of levels of pressure that this setup provides? My older Wacom tablet is 255 levels and I find it a bit unnatural, but then I didn't find the 1024 levels on my larger and newer tablet to be vastly superior. I think Wacom has increased it to 2048(??) since.
  • Reply 191 of 247
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    brucemc wrote: »
    I agree with what you are saying here.


    But you are often doing the same thing.  You had multiple posts on the forum where you were critical of the (rumoured) 6s features weeks ago, long before the product was revealed.  You are often critical of Apple features & services the day after announcement.  


    Glad that sometimes you can see that it one should actually use a product before commenting on it. 

    Hmm...I don't remember being critical about features, unless the amount of RAM in the deceive is a feature. Really the only things I've been critical about are RAM and stupid 16GB storage. And I'm critical about RAM based on actual usage. I'm sick and tired of having Safari tabs constantly reload or every time I switch from one app to another it needs to refresh. But if the rumors of iPad pro getting 4 GB RAM are true then it's almost guaranteed the new iPhones will have 2 GB RAM.
  • Reply 192 of 247
    haggar wrote: »
    Higher end Wacom tablets are both pressure and tilt sensitive, all without requiring a powered stylus.  Whether Apple Pencils's powered implementation provides more accuracy would require visibility into the technical specs - the same specs to which Apple fans tend to say "so what" whenever Apple products are compared to non-Apple products.

    :???: Since when are tech specs not ever a consideration?
  • Reply 193 of 247
    alfiejralfiejr Posts: 1,524member
    Apple just killed Surface. RIP.

    and MS finally had the sense to join the winning side instead of go on in denial. good leadership actually. they just saved MS Office.

    even better leadership when they mercifully pull the plug on Windows phone next year.
  • Reply 194 of 247
    icoco3 wrote: »
    HAHA...the pens diameter appeared to be more than the iPad Pro thickness anyway.

    "Diameter"... "Thickness"...
    I love it when forum users talk dirty. :p
  • Reply 195 of 247
    alfiejr wrote: »
    Apple just killed Surface. RIP.

    and MS finally had the sense to join the winning side instead of go on in denial. good leadership actually. they just saved MS Office.

    even better leadership when they mercifully pull the plug on Windows phone next year.

    I don't think that's true. The diehard Apple haters need their fix.
  • Reply 196 of 247
    tmaytmay Posts: 6,241member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by DownShift View Post

     

    My opinion and perspective comes from the view of a creative / Industrial Designer and how I would use this device.  I've got a question that I can't seem to find anywhere

     

    Does the new Pencil have palm rejection or palm block like a Wacom Cintiq / Surface Pro Ntrig? This platform looks really promising but this is a feature that I always worked around in the past while drawing on an iPad.  Some of the video's seem to show people resting their hands on the screen while sketching and others don't.  It may seem trivial to most but when you are really diving into a project it's very important.

     

    I actually went to the darkside and purchased the original Surface Pro then upgraded to the Surface Pro 3 because Apple didn't make the hardware I needed as at the time which includes needing to sketch, render and communicate visual ideas quickly and accurately on the go - this could possibly bring me back into the fold for my portable needs.  (I'm all apple at my desktop workstation BTW using Wacom Cintiq monitors).

     

    Other notes and wishes by me - longtime digital doodler:

     

    It would've been cool to have at least one button to call up quick commands while sketching (eraser, switch tools, ect) - hunting for on-screen buttons slows down the creative process while you are focused and working on ideas.  I know it doesn't look as nice but Wacom's stylus use buttons for this reason and, contrary to the article, the Surface Pro 3's stylus makes this very handy as well - it's really not as complicated as the author of this article makes it sound.  While you are sketching your index finger naturally rests on the button and when you need to call up a command it's right there.

     

    I wish they would've found a way to have the pen "snap" to the magnetic side port of the iPad for charging and storage.  The lightning connector is cool but having this option as well would help me know it's charging while putting it into a bag heading to an on-site meeting.  It wouldn't change the aesthetic of the iPad if you didn't purchase the accessory but it gives it added functionality and convenience if it was purchased.

     

    What does the "nib" of the pencil feel like?  Does it have a slight "tooth" while working on the screen or does it make an annoying clicking sound of plastic against glass while sketching.

     

    Again,  I'm not a typical user but would consider myself more of a digital sketching artist / designer nerd so my questions come from that point of view.  I guess I'll have all of these questions answered when it's released in November :)


    I would have liked to see some announcements of support from Autodesk wrt some of its ID, Architectural, and MCAD design products since they showed an AutoCAD file in the marketing material.

     

    Also, in case you missed this link;

     

    http://www.cultofmac.com/388474/apple-pencil-versus-wacom-cintiq/

     

    I also will be trying out AstroPad with my current iPad Air to see how that works as an input device for my iMac 5K; they just announced future support for the iPad Pro.

  • Reply 197 of 247
    haggarhaggar Posts: 1,568member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dysamoria View Post



    Anyone find any info on the number of levels of pressure that this setup provides? My older Wacom tablet is 255 levels and I find it a bit unnatural, but then I didn't find the 1024 levels on my larger and newer tablet to be vastly superior. I think Wacom has increased it to 2048(??) since.



    You don't need to know that.  Specs are for Fandroids who like to fill out checklists so they can feel they've accomplished something by showing off how much RAM they have.  You just need to take Apple's word that Pencil is better than anything else out there.  Don't ask how or why, it just is.

  • Reply 198 of 247
    @Tmay Thanks for the link, much appreciated. Her dialogue sounds sort of silly, simplistic, biased and short sighted on how this tech is even used in the real world (even though she says she is an apple designer). I Have been fortunate to still use a cintiq 21ux from 2006 that works great to this day, I've used a Cintiq companion 2, cintiq 27QHD touch, a surface pro one and surface pro 3 as well as most top iPad stylus from the major manufactures since its introduction (I was gifted the Intuos creative stylus 1 & 2 from Wacom and the jot with pixelpoint from Andonit). I even sacraficed my fantastic iPhone 5 to purchase a Note 4 to do digital sketching on the go (That's how passionate and devoted to digital sketching I am) I'm going to have to just wait and see to try one out for myself before I form a firm opinion on Apples offering. From my experience with this tech she is right on a couple things but way off on the majority. That's just my opinion though (has she ever used Wacom's classic stylus for the cintiq? It's just like using a sharpie Fineline - you don't get much more unobtrusive than that while drawing. And her comments about the lag are really nit picky, when you are really moving I never notice these problems on any of the hardware I use except for the iPad). Check out @DownShift_Studio on Instagram or downshiftstudio.com on the web to see how I use this tech just so you can see that I'm not talking out of my ass here lol. I use this stuff everyday. I'm not a master by any stretch but I do know what I'm talking about. With all of that said, I still am looking forward to trying this new offering out and forming my own opinion. Have a good night!
  • Reply 199 of 247
    I agree. The article sounded biased and not fact-based but more like bashing in four of he Pencil. I am curious what more elaborate comparisons conclude.
  • Reply 200 of 247
    solipsismy wrote: »
    haggar wrote: »
    Higher end Wacom tablets are both pressure and tilt sensitive, all without requiring a powered stylus.  Whether Apple Pencils's powered implementation provides more accuracy would require visibility into the technical specs - the same specs to which Apple fans tend to say "so what" whenever Apple products are compared to non-Apple products.

    :???: Since when are tech specs not ever a consideration?

    I'd say, ever since Samsung figured out how to make tests lie, and since they also know how to make numbers useless for real world performance.

    Apple's stance has been to show the buyer that the experience is more important than the numbers.
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