Hands on: iPad Pro with Apple Pencil

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  • Reply 241 of 247
    bsenka wrote: »
    Sometimes, without actually using the products, you just don't know who is right. I think these products are the types you not only have to use, but use enough to know what the differences are. I expect a lot of reviews that seem to make sense only if you don't know enough to know the difference. Given how most people on this board scoff at the Surface Pro, (and styluses in general) it's really clear that they are not able to figure out that middle ground -- they just don't know what they're talking about.

    I disagree with that. Between family and friends, which include people I've known for years on this and other forums, there is a long enough history that I know if they say something I have a very good idea of what to expect and vice versa. This also extends to many reviewers I've read online for years, not just in tech, but also with movies and the the like. Dong, I'm not familiar with so I couldn't make a determination based on that.

    Note: It's highly unlikely that I'd ever buy an iPad Pro for myself as my talents aren't in graphical design or anything that would need a large tablet or a stylus… at least at this point.
  • Reply 242 of 247
    bsenka wrote: »
    Linda Dong? Yeah, she's taken a lot of flack for not disclosing that she was part of the team that built the Pencil, and grossly misrepesenting how Wacom styluses do and do not work. It was PR, nothing more. She even took some of the glaring negatives of the Pencil like the lack of side switches and tried to paint those as positives.

    Again, I've not seen a single feature or function listed or demoed for the Pencil that I have not already been using for years with Wacom products. If anything Wacom still has many features that the Pencil is lacking.

    As for reviews, I'm really looking forward to seeing what Ray Frenden thinks once he's used it. I'm still not sure if I'm going to wait for his review, or just go ahead and order it anyway.

    Ray tends to prefer settings that require a lot of pressure. According to Rene Ritchie, the Pencil is really good and he has a background in illustration.
  • Reply 243 of 247
    Ray tends to prefer settings that require a lot of pressure.

    Doesn't Pencil being BT and therefore talking to the display mean that more control be built into how both the stylus and display interact with other so that, for instance, Ray could make it require more pressure for a give taken than, say, Ritchie?
  • Reply 244 of 247
    tmaytmay Posts: 6,241member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismY View Post





    Doesn't Pencil being BT and therefore talking to the display mean that more control be built into how both the stylus and display interact with other so that, for instance, Ray could make it require more pressure for a give taken than, say, Ritchie?

    A future BT pen could have a lot of other functionality added via switches or force touch surfaces "a squeeze" that would extent the capabilities nicely. It would be very cool it Apple would sell a basic pen "cartridge" that could have many third party snap on sleeves to mimic specific tools and functionalities, for example an airbrush.

  • Reply 245 of 247
    polymniapolymnia Posts: 1,080member
    solipsismy wrote: »
    Doesn't Pencil being BT and therefore talking to the display mean that more control be built into how both the stylus and display interact with other so that, for instance, Ray could make it require more pressure for a give taken than, say, Ritchie?

    That is certainly possible, though there are other techniques besides BT to make such customizations. Once again, I know this is probably tiresome, but the Wacom software allows the user to customize pressure sensitivity. With a completely unpowered pen that has no chips or radio built in.

    I guess the reason I keep pointing out the lack of inherent superiority of the Apple Pencil is based on having used a 'dumb' pen requiring no power or radio for years to do sophisticated input. I am not easily impressed. Parity is great, and it appears the pencil achieves parity with the vanilla Wacom pen (though still inferior to the Art Pen), but I hope for superiority since the pen packs a battery, processor & radio. I hope that this more power & processing intensive method does make for a superior input method in the long run.

    All this said, I will purchase an iPad pro & pencil on day 1 of availability.
  • Reply 246 of 247

    All day battery life on both the iPad Pro & Apple Pencil. Not worried a bit about a convenience feature for charging the pencil. If you squint, it looks like the Pencil docked on the iPad Pro is giving the middle finger. 

     

    Or lack of holster...

     

    Making a leather hand stitched sleeve for this new iPad & slot for the pencil. More concerned about the iPad durability than the pencil. ..although 8 pencils = 1 iPad Pro

     

    You'll lose the pencil before you break its lightning head.

     

    One of my first (and last) industrial design courses called for $600 in supplies, most of which were paper, over-priced markers, pencils watercolors and other instruments that waste time, money & space to convey an idea. While I feel bad for small business art supply stores, I'm definitely rooting for a divergence from Wacom. The Pencil & Pro will pay for itself in 1-2 courses for a student and 1 project for a professional in ideation. Not to mention the true mobility aspects of this without compromising the apple eco.

     

    Newson probably behind the pencil. But If you've seen his sketches, you'd see that the irony of skilled illustrating & penmanship doesn't necessarily over-stand ideas.

     

    I hate drawing because of paper. But this thing might encourage more of it, in a more organized fashion, orderly storing of thoughts & ideas. Certainly beats using a thumb to sketch a hand.

  • Reply 247 of 247
    On another note, if the iPad gains capabilities that close the gap with laptops, I'm curious how app pricing will develop. Eg pixelmator costs a fraction for iOS compared to OSX.
    while I understand pricing differences due to functionality, I never really understood differences just due to screen estate, such as between iPhone and iPad.
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