'This would be bad for America,' Tim Cook tells ABC News about creating iPhone backdoor

Posted:
in General Discussion edited February 2016
Apple Chief Executive Tim Cook will take to the airwaves this evening in an exclusive interview with ABC's World News Tonight with David Muir, where he will explain why his company refuses to create a "backdoor" to unlock iPhones for the FBI.




Teasing tonight's interview with Muir, ABC shared a pair of snippets from the discussion. In their conversation, Cook explained that while public safety is important, so too is the protection of people's data.

"This is not something that we would create. This would be bad for America," Cook said of creating backdoor access to unlocking iPhones. "It would also set a precedent that I believe many people in America would be offended by."



Muir also asked Cook about how much communication his company had with the U.S. Justice Department before things came to a head in court last week. Cook said he wished there was more dialogue between the government and Apple before the issue became a public fight.

"This filing, we found out about the filing from the press," Cook said. "And I don't think that's the way the railroad should be run. And I don't think something so important to this country should be handled in this way."



The interview with Apple's CEO will air on World News Tonight with David Muir, which airs from 6:30 to 7 p.m. Eastern. An extended version of the interview will be available on ABCNews.com immediately after the broadcast airs.

Apple was apparently blindsided last week, when a U.S. magistrate judge ordered Apple to comply with FBI requests to help extract data from an iPhone owned by one of the shooters involved in the December terrorist attack in San Bernardino, Calif. The device in question is a passcode-protected iPhone 5c that the FBI seeks to unlock.

Following the judge's order, Apple has taken an extremely proactive and public approach to dealing with the issue. Cook himself issued an open letter to say that the creation of a backdoor tool to access a locked iPhone would set a bad precedent. Security advocates and tech industry insiders have largely sided with Apple, expressing concern over the power the government could wield if it were given backdoor entry into mobile platforms like Apple's iOS.

Government officials are locked out of the handset because, in the midst of their investigation, officials changed the passcode associated with the Apple ID used to back up the iPhone 5c. Had officials not changed that passcode via the Web, the iPhone could have been connected to a known Wi-Fi network and backed up to iCloud, at which point Apple would have been able to access the data in question.
brakkensockrolid
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 63
    jungmarkjungmark Posts: 6,661member
    Full court press. Keep it up, Tim. The FBI is taking advantage of our emotions.
    punkndrublicSpamSandwichbrakkenbaconstangbraderunnersockrolidpscooter63ration allostkiwihlee1169
  • Reply 2 of 63
    calicali Posts: 3,495member
    Good thing he's smart. Here's one guy in the tech industry who's thinking. Imagine Tim turning his back on Apple fans?

    I'm happy Apple products protect their users globally.
    brakkenbraderunnersockrolidtechnolostkiwihlee1169propodjbdragon
  • Reply 3 of 63
    Stan: Come on Tim. You're close, you're on the green. You just have to go for the
    cup.

    Kramer: What do you mean?

    Stan: Have her try on the bra, see if it fits.
  • Reply 4 of 63
    msanttimsantti Posts: 1,377member
    cali said:
    Good thing he's smart. Here's one guy in the tech industry who's thinking. Imagine Tim turning his back on Apple fans?

    I'm happy Apple products protect their users globally.
    "I'm happy Apple products protect their users (and terrorists) globally."

    Fixed.
    dinasore
  • Reply 5 of 63
    I think this is the leadership Sog35 was looking for out of Cook. Unfortunately, though, he has bigger fish to fry than dubious analyst supply check reports.
    lostkiwisteveh
  • Reply 6 of 63
    Why is it so difficult to state what it is that the government wants. It has been reported that the government wants a back-door through the operating system and, contradictorily, that it seeks to retrieve information from a specific phone.
  • Reply 7 of 63
    msantti said:
    cali said:
    Good thing he's smart. Here's one guy in the tech industry who's thinking. Imagine Tim turning his back on Apple fans?

    I'm happy Apple products protect their users globally.
    "I'm happy Apple products protect their users (and terrorists) globally."

    Fixed.
    Give it a fucking rest already, you're paranoid over terrorists, we get it.  Dirka dirka jihad
    braderunnerjwbl33sockrolidtechnoaaron sorensonpmzhlee1169SpamSandwichwilliamlondondrow
  • Reply 8 of 63
    msantti said:
    cali said:
    Good thing he's smart. Here's one guy in the tech industry who's thinking. Imagine Tim turning his back on Apple fans?

    I'm happy Apple products protect their users globally.
    "I'm happy Apple products protect their users (and terrorists) globally."

    Fixed.
    If you don't like Apple's stance on privacy and security, please just go to Android and do what you like. If you actually want to do something about 'terrorism', how about looking at the causes, not some potential way of finding six-month-old information that may or may not actually even exist, that also damages the security and privacy of millions of people around the world. If you really want to appear as anything other than a troll, research the topics you wish to comment on with more depth and less emotionalism.

    Trust Apple to be the ones to make a stand against Microsoft, Google, the US legal system, and now the worst aspects of US culture. Trust Apple to make a difference, to look to the future, and to bring a better future today. I vote Tim Cook for CEO of Apple, where he can continue making a difference!
    punkndrublicsockrolidtechnoration allostkiwitdknoxkevin keepropodjbdragon
  • Reply 9 of 63
    msanttimsantti Posts: 1,377member
    msantti said:
    "I'm happy Apple products protect their users (and terrorists) globally."

    Fixed.
    Give it a fucking rest already, you're paranoid over terrorists, we get it.  Dirka dirka jihad
    I  don't coddle up to them like you do.
    dinasore
  • Reply 10 of 63
    msanttimsantti Posts: 1,377member

    brakken said:
    msantti said:
    "I'm happy Apple products protect their users (and terrorists) globally."

    Fixed.
    If you don't like Apple's stance on privacy and security, please just go to Android and do what you like. If you actually want to do something about 'terrorism', how about looking at the causes, not some potential way of finding six-month-old information that may or may not actually even exist, that also damages the security and privacy of millions of people around the world. If you really want to appear as anything other than a troll, research the topics you wish to comment on with more depth and less emotionalism.

    Trust Apple to be the ones to make a stand against Microsoft, Google, the US legal system, and now the worst aspects of US culture. Trust Apple to make a difference, to look to the future, and to bring a better future today. I vote Tim Cook for CEO of Apple, where he can continue making a difference!
    Ok. There is no pertinent information on terrorist phones.

    Never had been and never will be.

    Thanks for the enlightenment.
    edited February 2016
  • Reply 11 of 63
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 4,498member
    msantti said:
    Give it a fucking rest already, you're paranoid over terrorists, we get it.  Dirka dirka jihad
    I  don't coddle up to them like you do.
    No, you just enjoy bending over so the government can give it to you the way they see fit.  Grow up.

    The FBI had their chances to get at the info until their idiocy and ineptness became known and the company changed the account password.  But don't let little things like details and facts get in the way.
    edited February 2016 punkndrublicsockrolidtdknoxicoco3jony0
  • Reply 12 of 63
    Tim Cook for president!
    jwbl33sockrolidjdgazlostkiwitdknox
  • Reply 13 of 63
    msantti said:

    brakken said:
    msantti said:
    "I'm happy Apple products protect their users (and terrorists) globally."

    Fixed.
    If you don't like Apple's stance on privacy and security, please just go to Android and do what you like. If you actually want to do something about 'terrorism', how about looking at the causes, not some potential way of finding six-month-old information that may or may not actually even exist, that also damages the security and privacy of millions of people around the world. If you really want to appear as anything other than a troll, research the topics you wish to comment on with more depth and less emotionalism.

    Trust Apple to be the ones to make a stand against Microsoft, Google, the US legal system, and now the worst aspects of US culture. Trust Apple to make a difference, to look to the future, and to bring a better future today. I vote Tim Cook for CEO of Apple, where he can continue making a difference!
    Ok. There is no pertinent information on terrorist phones.

    Never had been and never will be.

    Thanks for the enlightenment.
    First, it was a work phone owned by his employer that he didn't bother to destroy like he did with his personal phone. Second, the FBI had a month old copy of the contents of this phone from an iCloud backup. So, you're welcome for the enlightenment.
    tdknox
  • Reply 14 of 63
    jungmark said:
    Full court press. Keep it up, Tim. The FBI is taking advantage of our emotions.
    Yes, but the drive-by trolls keep demanding that we give up civil liberties and privacy for security because it'll be 9/11 all over again we're doomed why aren't you more patriotic. From Wikipedia:

    Appeal to emotion or argumentum ad passiones is a logical fallacy characterized by the manipulation of the recipient's emotions in order to win an argument, especially in the absence of factual evidence.[1] This kind of appeal to emotion is a type of red herring and encompasses several logical fallacies, including appeal to consequencesappeal to fearappeal to flatteryappeal to pityappeal to ridiculeappeal to spite, and wishful thinking.

    Instead of facts, persuasive language is used to develop the foundation of an appeal to emotion-based argument. Thus, the validity of the premises that establish such an argument does not prove to be verifiable.[2]

    punkndrublicpscooter63ration alhlee1169tdknoxicoco3
  • Reply 15 of 63
    tmaytmay Posts: 3,565member
    msantti said:
    cali said:
    Good thing he's smart. Here's one guy in the tech industry who's thinking. Imagine Tim turning his back on Apple fans?

    I'm happy Apple products protect their users globally.
    "I'm happy Apple products protect their users (and terrorists) globally."

    Fixed.
    Oh, so your another bedwetter. How nice. I'll bet you'll keep finding new bedwetters to commiserate with going by your toddler rants.
    edited February 2016
  • Reply 16 of 63
    Cook says Apple found out about this filing via the press. Slimy bastards.
    lostkiwihlee1169
  • Reply 17 of 63
    msantti said:
    cali said:
    Good thing he's smart. Here's one guy in the tech industry who's thinking. Imagine Tim turning his back on Apple fans?

    I'm happy Apple products protect their users globally.
    "I'm happy Apple products protect their users (and terrorists) globally."

    Fixed.
    Hahahahahagbdifhdgsjhahahahahdhdgdguw 
  • Reply 18 of 63
    Appeals to emotions, straw men, false equivalencies, etc, the tools of the demagogue are really put to use here; all in a days work....
    edited February 2016 ration allostkiwihlee1169tdknoxicoco3fastasleep
  • Reply 19 of 63
    msanttimsantti Posts: 1,377member
    sflocal said:
    msantti said:
    I  don't coddle up to them like you do.
    No, you just enjoy bending over so the government can give it to you the way they see fit.  Grow up.

    The FBI had their chances to get at the info until their idiocy and ineptness became known and the company changed the account password.  But don't let little things like details and facts get in the way.

    And if the phone was personal. I know the personal one was destroyed but what about next.
    edited February 2016
  • Reply 20 of 63
    msanttimsantti Posts: 1,377member

    tmay said:
    msantti said:
    "I'm happy Apple products protect their users (and terrorists) globally."

    Fixed.
    Oh, so your another bedwetter. How nice. I'll bet you'll keep finding new bedwetters to commiserate with going by your toddler rants.
    Hey, its fine if you waant to be pro terrorist.

    At least we know. 

    Oh, ad cry me a fucking river.

    I spent time in Iraq in the Army. I got a little different perspective about these cretin than you do.
    edited February 2016
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