Apple cuts prices on USB-C & Thunderbolt 3 gear in response to MacBook Pro backlash

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Comments

  • Reply 121 of 224
    Meanwhile, professional users are going to do itemized tax write-offs for their own equipment purchases anyway. 
  • Reply 122 of 224
    ktappe said:
    flaneur said:
    I never understood why people with serious work to do would care if their computer is a hundred grams lighter or a couple millimetres thinner.
    Because they don't. NOBODY cares if their MacBook is a couple mm thinner. The latest event proves that Apple is 100% out of touch with any consumer. I challenge ANYONE to produce a single consumer who was clammoring for a thinner MacBook Pro. A single one. 


    I bet you can find people who clamor for wider gamut RGB, fastest SSDs on the market, the ability to drive two 5K monitors, 2X trackpad size + Touch ID, and a single port that can run 13 peripherals at once through one hub.
    smaceslin
  • Reply 123 of 224
    This goes against the previous Apple claim that these new Pro models are selling better than ever before. They do match my own thoughts that I would hold off buying this new model and perhaps get an older cheaper model with standard USB ports.
    duervo
  • Reply 124 of 224
    And Apple - while you're at it - reduce the new MacBook Pro laptop prices too.  These new laptops are way too pricey for me!
    duervo
  • Reply 124 of 224
    mazda 3s said:
    They also slashed prices on the brand new LG 5K and 4K monitors by 25% according to MR
    Oh my god they did.  That's a huge discount.  Now I might pounce on a 5K...
  • Reply 124 of 224
    Nice, but not even close to good enough. Sounds like there is a serious problem with the new macbook pros. I have never had schiller & Co., come out and  be so vocal about a product launch. I smell fear, and desperation. They say best sales ever, I think the internet proves otherwise:  See what all the other big name longtime pro mac users are saying - 
    http://mjtsai.com/blog/2016/10/27/new-macbook-pros-and-the-state-of-the-mac/


    duervo
  • Reply 127 of 224
    Waiting a few weeks to see how the pricing settles. 
  • Reply 128 of 224
    I use and love Apple since 1988. I would never consider using other products. But today, I have mixed feelings and I'm quite worried about Apple answering my simple needs. It's not these new MBP per se : they seem great machines, I'm very happy about some new features, like the touch bar and the touch ID. And even the USB-C / TB only ports seems a good decision. Apple's bold moves have never been the problem for me. But there's a lack of consistency and direction in the Mac field since years now that the MBP / Iphone 7 just put the light on. 

    So : MBP are for pros, so we keep the minijack... but without the optical port. The USB-C is the only way... but we don't use it for the new Iphone. We help the customers with an adapter for the Lightning only port on the Iphone... but we don't put an USB A/C adapter in MBP boxes. We are proud to impose in a bold move the port of the future and say "Get over it" to the customers... but a week later we make some discounts on some adapters. 

    Aren't there meetings where clear strategies are chosen ? Who thought it would be a good idea to abandon two universal, convenient, easy ports (USB and minijack) at the same time on two major products (iPhone and MBP) WITHOUT making the new solutions compatible (iPhone / USB-C and MBP / lightning) ? I'm not used to Apple sending mixed and contradictory messages. I'd rather have a company that makes errors from time to time but has a vision than this big headless thing that can't decide if it wants to go on with the pro market or to stop, or that explains us that portability justifies the most radical choices… but that makes the exact same choices (thin, thin, thin) on a desktop ? 

    Bottom and concrete line for me : I’m willing to change my early 2009 Mac Pro (a great and robust machine) for 2 or 3 years without finding a product fitting my needs : I considered the 2013 Mac Pro but monitors were too pricey for me at the time. Today the Mac Pro « bin » is too old. The iMac could have been a solution but since the machine is not very flexible, I want it to have the latest port technology, so I’m waiting for TB3… It’s fine because my 2009 Mac Pro works fine, but it’s very frustrating to be willing to buy a new machine, to enjoy the latest OS ans technology and to be unable to do it because Apple is too busy building a car in some warehouse. 

    Surely the new MBP doesn’t deserve such a negative feedback. They must be good machines. But the lack of global strategy, the mixed signals, the hesitations, the severe need for refreshments (iMac, Mac Pro etc.), in one word the context — all this explains the bitterness, the disappointment and sometimes the anger, that a 20% discount on some adapters or some approximative justifications won’t soften. 
    baconstang
  • Reply 129 of 224
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 7,502member
    digitol said:
    Nice, but not even close to good enough. Sounds like there is a serious problem with the new macbook pros. I have never had schiller & Co., come out and  be so vocal about a product launch. I smell fear, and desperation. They say best sales ever, I think the internet proves otherwise:  See what all the other big name longtime pro mac users are saying - 
    http://mjtsai.com/blog/2016/10/27/new-macbook-pros-and-the-state-of-the-mac/


    I've been following that page since it was published and seeing it grow and grow but still there are people that insist that the complaints are coming from a vocal minority. In their eyes the complainers are just bitching, whining, griping etc. All the complaints are unjustified (and few and far between to boot) and Apple got everything right with their decisions. Even the pricing, as it took a large chunk of resources to produce the new machine. The people that are unhappy should voice their opinion and not buy. The people that are happy should just buy and be even happier. 

    Maybe, and just maybe, Apple will wake up and build something that fits the needs of what people want.

    It is ironic that, looking around the web, the 'vocal minority' is that group of users who are defending the new line at any cost, and not the group that is criticising it.
    duervo
  • Reply 130 of 224
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 7,502member
    Soli said:
    avon b7 said:
    nht said:
    avon b7 said:
    WHY are people so attached to USB-A connectors?! We've been complaining about them for years! Everyone celebrated when the USB-C connector was announced. Now we finally get them and people complain? I don't get it. The C connector is a massive improvement -- shouldn't we be glad to have them?

    As for adapters, about the only common use case I can think of that might require one is flash drives. Those need to retain the A connector to plug into other computers. As for everything else, just replace the cable! $5-8 each at Monoprice. Not a big expense, not a hassle, and freedom from perpetual connector flipping!

    As for the "transition," how would YOU do it? A machine with half good connectors and half shitty ones? How is that better than using a couple adapters for a while or just replacing a couple cables? Is there some benefit to that approach that I'm just not seeing?

    It's obvious that USB-A, B, mini-B and Micro-B are going to be memories a year from now. Firewire already is. Do you want a machine with ports dedicated to things that no longer exist, or one with universal ports that can be used for everything from power to drives to networking to displays to whatever else comes out next week? I *MUCH* prefer the latter!
    Although USB-C is better it doesn't make the others ones shitty. Yes, a smooth transition would have been simple by including two USB-C ports and the existing ports. Adapters are a pain. They break. They get lost. They get in the way. The ad bulk. They cost extra. 
    The other ones Are shitty.  It's a joke that you have to try to plug in a USB-A cord three times.  It's funny because it's often true.

    By shipping 4 USB-C Apple has ensured that in the future you won't need crappy adapters to connect USB-C cables to the laptop.  Given that you can already buy USB-C to lighting and USB-C to USB-A cables it's relatively cheap to move into the future today.  As lorin states the only things that will require an adapter or hub are USB sticks.  That will pass quickly enough.  I have a drawer full of USB2 sticks I don't use anymore.  The USB-3 sticks will join them as I buy USB-C sticks.
    I've never had to plug in  USB three times. How do you know you won't have the same issues with [reversible] USB-C? Or worse?
    Holy crap on a cracker. That has to be the dumbest thing I've ever seen on a tech forum.
    I thought you were referring to getting a device recognised,  not being able to plug it in. Most of my cables have the USB symbol to aid in insertion. For vertical back facing ports (iMac) I only ever plug in once because I use extension cables. Then I just look at the ports to get the insertion right. Reversible is better but Type A is a non-issue.
    edited November 2016 baconstangduervo
  • Reply 131 of 224
    brucemcbrucemc Posts: 1,541member
    digitol said:
    Nice, but not even close to good enough. Sounds like there is a serious problem with the new macbook pros. I have never had schiller & Co., come out and  be so vocal about a product launch. I smell fear, and desperation. They say best sales ever, I think the internet proves otherwise:  See what all the other big name longtime pro mac users are saying - 
    http://mjtsai.com/blog/2016/10/27/new-macbook-pros-and-the-state-of-the-mac/


    It must be true, I read it in the Internet. 
    SpamSandwich
  • Reply 132 of 224
    flaneurflaneur Posts: 4,526member
    Farnaby said:
    I use and love Apple since 1988. I would never consider using other products. But today, I have mixed feelings and I'm quite worried about Apple answering my simple needs. It's not these new MBP per se : they seem great machines, I'm very happy about some new features, like the touch bar and the touch ID. And even the USB-C / TB only ports seems a good decision. Apple's bold moves have never been the problem for me. But there's a lack of consistency and direction in the Mac field since years now that the MBP / Iphone 7 just put the light on. 

    So : MBP are for pros, so we keep the minijack... but without the optical port. The USB-C is the only way... but we don't use it for the new Iphone. We help the customers with an adapter for the Lightning only port on the Iphone... but we don't put an USB A/C adapter in MBP boxes. We are proud to impose in a bold move the port of the future and say "Get over it" to the customers... but a week later we make some discounts on some adapters. 

    Aren't there meetings where clear strategies are chosen ? Who thought it would be a good idea to abandon two universal, convenient, easy ports (USB and minijack) at the same time on two major products (iPhone and MBP) WITHOUT making the new solutions compatible (iPhone / USB-C and MBP / lightning) ? I'm not used to Apple sending mixed and contradictory messages. I'd rather have a company that makes errors from time to time but has a vision than this big headless thing that can't decide if it wants to go on with the pro market or to stop, or that explains us that portability justifies the most radical choices… but that makes the exact same choices (thin, thin, thin) on a desktop ? 

    Bottom and concrete line for me : I’m willing to change my early 2009 Mac Pro (a great and robust machine) for 2 or 3 years without finding a product fitting my needs : I considered the 2013 Mac Pro but monitors were too pricey for me at the time. Today the Mac Pro « bin » is too old. The iMac could have been a solution but since the machine is not very flexible, I want it to have the latest port technology, so I’m waiting for TB3… It’s fine because my 2009 Mac Pro works fine, but it’s very frustrating to be willing to buy a new machine, to enjoy the latest OS ans technology and to be unable to do it because Apple is too busy building a car in some warehouse. 

    Surely the new MBP doesn’t deserve such a negative feedback. They must be good machines. But the lack of global strategy, the mixed signals, the hesitations, the severe need for refreshments (iMac, Mac Pro etc.), in one word the context — all this explains the bitterness, the disappointment and sometimes the anger, that a 20% discount on some adapters or some approximative justifications won’t soften. 
    "I use and love Apple since 1988."  Not a good start. Troll meter engaged.

    Anyway, you're basically saying that the failure to remove the headphone jack on the new laptops indicates the lack of a global strategy. Got it.
    nolamacguy
  • Reply 133 of 224
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 7,502member
    flaneur said:
    Farnaby said:
    I use and love Apple since 1988. I would never consider using other products. But today, I have mixed feelings and I'm quite worried about Apple answering my simple needs. It's not these new MBP per se : they seem great machines, I'm very happy about some new features, like the touch bar and the touch ID. And even the USB-C / TB only ports seems a good decision. Apple's bold moves have never been the problem for me. But there's a lack of consistency and direction in the Mac field since years now that the MBP / Iphone 7 just put the light on. 

    So : MBP are for pros, so we keep the minijack... but without the optical port. The USB-C is the only way... but we don't use it for the new Iphone. We help the customers with an adapter for the Lightning only port on the Iphone... but we don't put an USB A/C adapter in MBP boxes. We are proud to impose in a bold move the port of the future and say "Get over it" to the customers... but a week later we make some discounts on some adapters. 

    Aren't there meetings where clear strategies are chosen ? Who thought it would be a good idea to abandon two universal, convenient, easy ports (USB and minijack) at the same time on two major products (iPhone and MBP) WITHOUT making the new solutions compatible (iPhone / USB-C and MBP / lightning) ? I'm not used to Apple sending mixed and contradictory messages. I'd rather have a company that makes errors from time to time but has a vision than this big headless thing that can't decide if it wants to go on with the pro market or to stop, or that explains us that portability justifies the most radical choices… but that makes the exact same choices (thin, thin, thin) on a desktop ? 

    Bottom and concrete line for me : I’m willing to change my early 2009 Mac Pro (a great and robust machine) for 2 or 3 years without finding a product fitting my needs : I considered the 2013 Mac Pro but monitors were too pricey for me at the time. Today the Mac Pro « bin » is too old. The iMac could have been a solution but since the machine is not very flexible, I want it to have the latest port technology, so I’m waiting for TB3… It’s fine because my 2009 Mac Pro works fine, but it’s very frustrating to be willing to buy a new machine, to enjoy the latest OS ans technology and to be unable to do it because Apple is too busy building a car in some warehouse. 

    Surely the new MBP doesn’t deserve such a negative feedback. They must be good machines. But the lack of global strategy, the mixed signals, the hesitations, the severe need for refreshments (iMac, Mac Pro etc.), in one word the context — all this explains the bitterness, the disappointment and sometimes the anger, that a 20% discount on some adapters or some approximative justifications won’t soften. 
    "I use and love Apple since 1988."  Not a good start. Troll meter engaged.

    Anyway, you're basically saying that the failure to remove the headphone jack on the new laptops indicates the lack of a global strategy. Got it.
    Basically. NO. He explained things well. Perhaps there was some interference coming out of your troll meter?

    He is worried about the bigger picture. He gave the example of lack of coordination/solution on the MBP/iPhone 7 connectivity issue. He wants to upgrade from a Mac Pro and have some future proofing. He looked at the rest of the product matrix and saw nothing to fit his needs for varying reason (stale lineup, lack of flexibility etc). He also noted that pricing was somewhat high. His observation was that perhaps Apple had invested too much time and effort in developing other products. He even gave an example: the car project.

    It was a balanced post. He gave his opinion. You don't have to share it and you don't have to belittle it either.
    baconstangduervosingularity
  • Reply 134 of 224
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 7,502member

    brucemc said:
    digitol said:
    Nice, but not even close to good enough. Sounds like there is a serious problem with the new macbook pros. I have never had schiller & Co., come out and  be so vocal about a product launch. I smell fear, and desperation. They say best sales ever, I think the internet proves otherwise:  See what all the other big name longtime pro mac users are saying - 
    http://mjtsai.com/blog/2016/10/27/new-macbook-pros-and-the-state-of-the-mac/


    It must be true, I read it in the Internet. 
    It must be true. I heard it from the mouth of an Apple Engineer
    mr o
  • Reply 135 of 224
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 7,502member
    wiggin said:

    What would be the impact to you if the MBP did have a USB A port? Either in addition to the 4 C ports or in place of one (if you ever have 4 things plugged in at the same time, what are the odds that there isn't at least one of them that's a USB A device?). What harm would it cause you???

    That, kids, is how a grown-up presents an argument.

    I *like* having four universal ports, but if I was in a design meeting and you put it to me that way, I might be inclined to include an A port!
    I would like to add to this. Apple has long had serious communication issues. It has no idea how to prepare its users for the future. When they draw up their roadmaps they aren't just dealing with one product but various models. At the design meeting they obviously considered adding the USB-C ports to the current port spread but decided not to. They are now getting an idea about users feel about that. An easier transition would have been to gradually phase in the USB-C ports and tell people honestly at the presentation that future models would phase out older port technology. There would no harm done. People wouldn't suffer with adapters. They wouldn't suffer the teething problems of the new protocols, chipset issues etc. They would know where Apple saw the future. It would be a win, win. We didn't get that option because someone at Apple is obsessed with thinness.

    So much of what has happened this week could have been avoided. Some will remember how Apple dropped Firewire without warning and the uproar was so intense that they had to bring it back. In that case they didn't even inform the firewire team at Apple about their plans or device makers, many of whom were in the process of bringing new products to market.
    baconstangduervo
  • Reply 136 of 224
    canukstormcanukstorm Posts: 2,680member
    avon b7 said:
    avon b7 said:
    adonissmu said:
    sumergo said:
    zoetmb said:
    slurpy said:
    Awesome move by Apple. This SHOULD shut up most of the complaints, but of course it won't. 
    It's not like Apple is selling $500 laptops.   There's two ways to look at this:  


    Apple has lost it's way regarding usability - criticism is warranted.

    Ive may or may not be a good industrial designer but he clearly doesn't know much about the main concepts of usability - the "look, feel & flow" of a hardware/software product.  We get the "look": but the "feel & flow"? - any sense of how it actually feels to use the product effectively day by day is missing from the designs.  As zoetmb notes, Apple doesn't appear to use the devices they produce any more.  We certainly don't see any pix of MBPs with cascades of dongles cluttering the user's desk.

    It's not just my view - here are comments from a couple of the world's top UI/UX/Interaction designers who worked with Apple to create it's original world-class usability experience.
    http://www.fastcodesign.com/3053406/how-apple-is-giving-design-a-bad-name
    Apple isn't losing anything accept for a sale or two initially. Apple has done this move before....and repeatedly. Apple is willing to stand on principle and moving the tech world forward over the hollering and griping of their users. They are doing standard Apple stuff. 
    It took Fireman Phil just six days to organize an interview just send out a message to the users. Now they are cutting dongle prices (temporarily). The internet is ignoring most of the good in these macs because the bad outshines it. There are no end of parody videos popping up everywhere. What is strange is that a huge part of the criticism is coming from Apple's own users. Design changes and decisions aside, the biggest problem is that MANY users feel these macs are enormously overpriced or simply out of reach.

    Apple will try to ride the storm but this time I think they won't be able to stand on principle.  With only the iPhone 7 and the new MBPs here in time for Christmas and the rest of the line without a refresh but also overpriced and out of date, earnings could be impacted. Stormy weather might be just around the corner.
    "The internet is ignoring most of the good in these macs because the bad outshines it"

    It isn't so much the internet that's focused on it except for a bunch pedantic tech bloggers who are hyper-focused on a singular & blowing shit out of proportion.  These tech blogger act as if this is Apple's first rodeo when it comes to dropping old ports. Read this for some perspective

    https://birchtree.me/blog/apple-does-this-sort-of-thing/
    Not really. Just look at the comments on those posts/blogs/videos etc. The people are venting their anger and frustration. They are not happy. If they still buy, it will be with reluctance. If they don't, Apple will have some major egg on its face and find itself at a crossroads. Ignore the customer or cater to what the customer wants. By that time we will have seen what traction Microsoft has gained with its new hardware. Interesting times.
    How much traction you think MS is going to get selling the Surface Studio at $3000 to $4,200 a pop. And I will add, they are using "outdated" CPU & GPU as well. The new Surface Book Performance Edition maxes out at 16GB RAM and if I'm not mistaken uses a dual-core CPU, like that used in the new 13" MBP with Touch Bar. Yet the price of that specific SKU starts at $2,400 - the same base price as the new 15" MBP (which is much faster than the Surface Book, has a higher quality screen, and weighs only a pound more).

    So how can one call the Surface Book a Pro machine and turn around and say the new MBP is lacking?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 137 of 224
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 7,502member
    avon b7 said:
    avon b7 said:
    adonissmu said:
    sumergo said:
    zoetmb said:
    slurpy said:
    Awesome move by Apple. This SHOULD shut up most of the complaints, but of course it won't. 
    It's not like Apple is selling $500 laptops.   There's two ways to look at this:  


    Apple has lost it's way regarding usability - criticism is warranted.

    Ive may or may not be a good industrial designer but he clearly doesn't know much about the main concepts of usability - the "look, feel & flow" of a hardware/software product.  We get the "look": but the "feel & flow"? - any sense of how it actually feels to use the product effectively day by day is missing from the designs.  As zoetmb notes, Apple doesn't appear to use the devices they produce any more.  We certainly don't see any pix of MBPs with cascades of dongles cluttering the user's desk.

    It's not just my view - here are comments from a couple of the world's top UI/UX/Interaction designers who worked with Apple to create it's original world-class usability experience.
    http://www.fastcodesign.com/3053406/how-apple-is-giving-design-a-bad-name
    Apple isn't losing anything accept for a sale or two initially. Apple has done this move before....and repeatedly. Apple is willing to stand on principle and moving the tech world forward over the hollering and griping of their users. They are doing standard Apple stuff. 
    It took Fireman Phil just six days to organize an interview just send out a message to the users. Now they are cutting dongle prices (temporarily). The internet is ignoring most of the good in these macs because the bad outshines it. There are no end of parody videos popping up everywhere. What is strange is that a huge part of the criticism is coming from Apple's own users. Design changes and decisions aside, the biggest problem is that MANY users feel these macs are enormously overpriced or simply out of reach.

    Apple will try to ride the storm but this time I think they won't be able to stand on principle.  With only the iPhone 7 and the new MBPs here in time for Christmas and the rest of the line without a refresh but also overpriced and out of date, earnings could be impacted. Stormy weather might be just around the corner.
    "The internet is ignoring most of the good in these macs because the bad outshines it"

    It isn't so much the internet that's focused on it except for a bunch pedantic tech bloggers who are hyper-focused on a singular & blowing shit out of proportion.  These tech blogger act as if this is Apple's first rodeo when it comes to dropping old ports. Read this for some perspective

    https://birchtree.me/blog/apple-does-this-sort-of-thing/
    Not really. Just look at the comments on those posts/blogs/videos etc. The people are venting their anger and frustration. They are not happy. If they still buy, it will be with reluctance. If they don't, Apple will have some major egg on its face and find itself at a crossroads. Ignore the customer or cater to what the customer wants. By that time we will have seen what traction Microsoft has gained with its new hardware. Interesting times.
    How much traction you think MS is going to get selling the Surface Studio at $3000 to $4,200 a pop. And I will add, they are using "outdated" CPU & GPU as well. The new Surface Book Performance Edition maxes out at 16GB RAM and if I'm not mistaken uses a dual-core CPU, like that used in the new 13" MBP with Touch Bar. Yet the price of that specific SKU starts at $2,400 - the same base price as the new 15" MBP (which is much faster than the Surface Book, has a higher quality screen, and weighs only a pound more).

    So how can one call the Surface Book a Pro machine and turn around and say the new MBP is lacking?
    That will be decided by the users who can afford these things. I can't. They will look to what they need and take a decision. It's interesting because Microsoft is making a play -directly- for those users.
  • Reply 138 of 224
    Apple has lost it's way regarding usability - criticism is warranted.

    Ive may or may not be a good industrial designer but he clearly doesn't know much about the main concepts of usability - the "look, feel & flow" of a hardware/software product.  We get the "look": but the "feel & flow"? - any sense of how it actually feels to use the product effectively day by day is missing from the designs.  As zoetmb notes, Apple doesn't appear to use the devices they produce any more.  We certainly don't see any pix of MBPs with cascades of dongles cluttering the user's desk.

    It's not just my view - here are comments from a couple of the world's top UI/UX/Interaction designers who worked with Apple to create it's original world-class usability experience.
    http://www.fastcodesign.com/3053406/how-apple-is-giving-design-a-bad-name
    Great link, thank you.

    I've been waiting a long time for a new MBP (full disclosure: I now have one on order) but I was dismayed by the new model, particularly its connectivity. I have reflected on it and I see the USB-C and nothing but USB-C as a valid view of the future; when all devices have matured then it will be great to have four universal ports. That makes the omission of other interface types in the core computer a credible design decision.

    But the problem is related to your comments on day by day use: the new MBP is almost useless today. Without a handful of dongles, it can't live in today's world where memory sticks, external drives and devices wanting power to charge want USB-A, projectors want VGA, monitors want Displayport, SD Cards want .. well USB-A for a card reader, and so on. And perhaps a Lightning port for headphones too  ;-)

    In two or three years, this design is going to look really smart but, in the meantime, the old interfaces are essential. So the dongles are essential (literally). So the dongles should have been in the box, particularly as they are throw-away items when the USB-C future arrives. There is precedent for this with the iPhone 7 and headphones (and with the very first MacBook Air that introduced new interface standards, there were two dongles in the box).

    This isn't so much an issue of cost as principle, of Apple's comprehension of its customers' needs and the fact that it is selling an incomplete product. That's disappointing or deceptive, according to your world-view. So I welcome the price cut (the MBP was expensive enough!) but I remain disappointed that Apple got into this position.
    baconstang
  • Reply 139 of 224
    mac_128mac_128 Posts: 3,454member
    command_f said:
    Apple has lost it's way regarding usability - criticism is warranted.

    Ive may or may not be a good industrial designer but he clearly doesn't know much about the main concepts of usability - the "look, feel & flow" of a hardware/software product.  We get the "look": but the "feel & flow"? - any sense of how it actually feels to use the product effectively day by day is missing from the designs.  As zoetmb notes, Apple doesn't appear to use the devices they produce any more.  We certainly don't see any pix of MBPs with cascades of dongles cluttering the user's desk.

    It's not just my view - here are comments from a couple of the world's top UI/UX/Interaction designers who worked with Apple to create it's original world-class usability experience.
    http://www.fastcodesign.com/3053406/how-apple-is-giving-design-a-bad-name
    Great link, thank you.

    I've been waiting a long time for a new MBP (full disclosure: I now have one on order) but I was dismayed by the new model, particularly its connectivity. I have reflected on it and I see the USB-C and nothing but USB-C as a valid view of the future; when all devices have matured then it will be great to have four universal ports. That makes the omission of other interface types in the core computer a credible design decision.

    But the problem is related to your comments on day by day use: the new MBP is almost useless today. Without a handful of dongles, it can't live in today's world where memory sticks, external drives and devices wanting power to charge want USB-A, projectors want VGA, monitors want Displayport, SD Cards want .. well USB-A for a card reader, and so on. And perhaps a Lightning port for headphones too  ;-)

    In two or three years, this design is going to look really smart but, in the meantime, the old interfaces are essential. So the dongles are essential (literally). So the dongles should have been in the box, particularly as they are throw-away items when the USB-C future arrives. There is precedent for this with the iPhone 7 and headphones (and with the very first MacBook Air that introduced new interface standards, there were two dongles in the box).

    This isn't so much an issue of cost as principle, of Apple's comprehension of its customers' needs and the fact that it is selling an incomplete product. That's disappointing or deceptive, according to your world-view. So I welcome the price cut (the MBP was expensive enough!) but I remain disappointed that Apple got into this position.
    You realize everything you said here could have been said in 1999 about the new PowerMacs and PowerBooks.
  • Reply 140 of 224
    A nitpick:

    To use non-C connectors with a MacBook Pro you do not use a "dongle," you use an "adapter."

    A dongle is a piece of hardware that stores a software license. It connects to a computer to allow that software to run. Without it the software is disabled. The Pace iLok is an example of a dongle.

    A device that allows putting one kind of plug into another kind of jack/socket/port is an adapter.

    I know we all understand what we're talking about here, but by confusing the definition for others it impedes effective communication in the "pro" environments about which we're claiming concern. It leads to conversations like:

    Freelancer: "Pro Tools won't start. I'm getting a license authorization pop-up."
    Staffer: "You need to plug in the dongle."
    Freelancer: "No, I have the older machine with the regular ports."
    Staffer: "FML."
    baconstangSpamSandwichnolamacguywatto_cobra
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