First look: Apple's bionic iPhone X with Face ID

1234568»

Comments

  • Reply 141 of 153
    Using terms like that makes you appear to be a troll.
    Even just a cursory look at my posting history would have dispelled that notion. My motivation was not to just strip up shit -- I think people who derive enjoyment from that are sociopathic -- but to encourage writing that is less congratulatory and more evaluative.

    [...] DED isn’t a zealot, he’s a columnist and he backs up his conclusions with reasoning and facts.
    In my opinion, Mr. Dilger backs up his conclusions with facts the same way a corporate communications or political spokesperson does. He seems to begin with the conclusion then constructs the factual argument to support the premise. One doesn't have to dislike Apple to question fawning praise that dismisses and derides alternative viewpoints and preferences. I like Apple, and usually even agree with Mr. Dilger's assessments. I'm just suspicious of any commentary that doesn't allow for the existence of valid use cases outside Apple's design and that tries to pre-emptively quiet differing views.

    [...] This upsets those who struggle with reasoning, fatcs, and the conclusion that Apple’s products are usually better. 
    Actually, in my case, it's upsetting because the reasoning and facts are limited to supporting the thesis that Apple's way is always the right way. It's tacitly insulting to anyone with other ideas. I agree that Apple's products are usually better than alternatives, but:

    1. Sometimes they're not. From time to time, someone else makes something that's better than what Apple offers. Recognizing and acknowledging those cases provides users with information that may better guide their choices and provide feedback to Apple.

    2. As you've pointed out yourself, design decisions are rarely "right" or "wrong." There are usually many variables that have to be considered, and despite the best intentions and efforts of the designers, some of those choices are going to conflict with the way some users like to work. The fact that the choice was made by Apple does not make it unassailable or render those considerations invalid.

    3. Starting from a presumption of Apple's infallibility makes it impossible to imagine ways they could be even better. If a problem (or, let's call it an "imperfection") is discussed openly, positive thinkers will come up with a solution. When any viewpoint that isn't on-board with Apple's approach is considered heretical the path to improvement is closed.

    [...] Your “calling him out” just demonstrates that you struggle with these things, and or the job of a columnist. 
    I'm not a journalist myself, but I do work among them. Much of what I've written here is based on my observations of what they do. But perhaps there's a difference between a journalist and a columnist? Maybe objectivity isn't in DED's job description.

    Anyway, bottom line, my objection to praise prose isn't based on disliking Apple or lack of reasoning. Just the opposite. I like Apple a lot, and I know from experience that some of its products have imperfections, in the form of both features that appear to be wildly divisive and some "unexpected behaviours." Basic reasoning tells us that there are no absolutes. I don't expect or want articles that focus on flaws, but when article after article dismisses any notion of there ever being a problem or equally valid alternative approaches, I stop taking the author seriously. That's all.
    I don’t need to read “equally valid alternative approaches” in an article because I am able to consider, evaluate and verify those “equally valid alternative approaches” personally. I read an article to acquire some knowledge and I am not offended if that knowledge is presented along with the author’s clearly specified personal views and commentaries. In providing that knowledge the author didn’t disappoint me to date. This is a tech site that strives to provide information on daily developments. If your intellectual scope is much larger than that I’d refer you to iTunes U for Humanities and “equally valid alternative approaches”.
    StrangeDays
  • Reply 142 of 153
    Hi all, new member here and long time reader of this site :)

    I have a question maybe somebody could answer regarding this iPhone and its facial recognition - after the recognition is confirmed, is there any further security step (Pin code etc) that needs to be performed ? Or does the face recognition itself unlock the phone ?

    Thanks.
    That article may help:
    http://iphone.appleinsider.com/articles/17/10/31/face-id-on-iphone-x-is-just-as-fast-if-not-faster-than-touch-id
  • Reply 143 of 153
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 7,155member
    Hi all, new member here and long time reader of this site :)

    I have a question maybe somebody could answer regarding this iPhone and its facial recognition - after the recognition is confirmed, is there any further security step (Pin code etc) that needs to be performed ? Or does the face recognition itself unlock the phone ?

    Thanks.
    No further steps. Face ID unlocks your iPhone, period.
  • Reply 144 of 153
    bb-15 said:
    You claim that the First Look article "dismisses any notion of there ever being a problem". 
    This is simply not true. 

    From the article;

    "with Face ID,... It does however, require some significant adjustments… 

    The worst part of the unboxing is that iPhone X still only ships with an inadequate 5-watt USB charger, even though the new phone supports Qi wireless charging and USB-PD Fast Charging. Actually using either one requires some additional purchases… 

    One potential disadvantage over Touch ID is that you can't share a device (some couples apparently configure a shared device using each of their fingerprints); Face ID is designed to work with one person."

    Well, apparently I was completely, 100%, dead wrong.

    To Mr. Dilger, a sincere and unreserved apology.

    I didn't even read the article. I made assumptions based on past readings and the summary on the home page. That was stupid and I'm sorry.

    bb-15 said:
    * So from my POV, you have not stated some grand infallible truth. Instead what you have done is come to an Apple centric website and have complained that people here prefer Apple products and that they enjoy reading articles which highlight the strengths of Apple products.
    Oh come on, that's not what I said and you know it. It's not an "Us vs. Them" thing -- you can't even get concensus about any particular feature among the Apple faithful. Just look at the discussions about ports and the keyboard on the recent MacBook Pro. One may hold a positive view of Apple and still examine the products with a critical eye and open mind, which is all I suggested.

    Obviously in this case that's exactly what happened so my ribbing was misplaced. The points I made are still perfectly valid. That's why I'm apologizing -- because I accused Mr. Dilger of NOT applying the objectivity I described. He did. I applaud that. Thank you for pointing it out to me.

    For the record, I obviously recognize that it's possible for a writer to come away from a first look with nothing but positive impressions. I don't expect anyone to concoct potential liabilities, just not to shy away from ones that actually present.
    gatorguy
  • Reply 145 of 153
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,969member
    lkrupp said:
    Hi all, new member here and long time reader of this site :)

    I have a question maybe somebody could answer regarding this iPhone and its facial recognition - after the recognition is confirmed, is there any further security step (Pin code etc) that needs to be performed ? Or does the face recognition itself unlock the phone ?

    Thanks.
    No further steps. Face ID unlocks your iPhone, period.
    That's not accurate. Not only are there are more additional steps to being able to use Face ID, Face ID doesn't "unlock the phone itself," it only unlocks the phone within set parameters after the passcode has been inputted first which tells the device it can start to allow Face ID to be used. You can't even setup Face ID until you have created at least a 6-digit PIN because the PIN is the fallback for device security if you restart the device, if too much time has passed between unlocking the device, and if there have been too many failed attempts to unlock the device using Face ID. You also use that PIN access the Settings area if you wish to alter the Face ID setup.
  • Reply 146 of 153
    adonissmuadonissmu Posts: 1,772member
    > To pay, you double tap the side button, similar to Apple Watch.

    This strikes me as a real step backward.

    Right now I keep my phone in my left shirt pocket, facing in, with the button at the top.

    To use APay, I simply reach up with with my right hand and grasp the end, with my thumb on the button. As I place it on the reader, this naturally "flips" the phone face up while also authenticating. It's one single motion.

    This is especially important because I have found most readers have some sort of plastic or rubbery C-shaped "cup" around the number buttons that are below the display area in order stop people from seeing you type in a PIN. These interfere with the placement of the phone, which I normally have to rotate so it's sideways on the reader.

    Now it appears I will have to hold the phone in such a way that I can double click the buttons, and while it can see my face. I'm a bit concerned that this will make it more difficult to use in this case, although only time will tell.
    I have both an iPhone and an iWatch and the watch is without a doubt faster to pay with. I double tap and scan. 

    The only reason I use touchID with the phone more at Duane Reade is their app doesn't have NFC in the watch app. For me the double tap and scan is less awkward. 
    edited November 2017
  • Reply 147 of 153
    adonissmuadonissmu Posts: 1,772member
    Soli said:
    lkrupp said:
    Hi all, new member here and long time reader of this site :)

    I have a question maybe somebody could answer regarding this iPhone and its facial recognition - after the recognition is confirmed, is there any further security step (Pin code etc) that needs to be performed ? Or does the face recognition itself unlock the phone ?

    Thanks.
    No further steps. Face ID unlocks your iPhone, period.
    That's not accurate. Not only are there are more additional steps to being able to use Face ID, Face ID doesn't "unlock the phone itself," it only unlocks the phone within set parameters after the passcode has been inputted first which tells the device it can start to allow Face ID to be used. You can't even setup Face ID until you have created at least a 6-digit PIN because the PIN is the fallback for device security if you restart the device, if too much time has passed between unlocking the device, and if there have been too many failed attempts to unlock the device using Face ID. You also use that PIN access the Settings area if you wish to alter the Face ID setup.
    The same is true for touchID. So yeah there are not additional steps to use FaceID. In fact every reviewer noted that it was easier to set up FaceID than TouchID. 
    edited November 2017 pscooter63StrangeDays
  • Reply 148 of 153
    kevin keekevin kee Posts: 1,043member
    Soli said:
    lkrupp said:
    Hi all, new member here and long time reader of this site :)

    I have a question maybe somebody could answer regarding this iPhone and its facial recognition - after the recognition is confirmed, is there any further security step (Pin code etc) that needs to be performed ? Or does the face recognition itself unlock the phone ?

    Thanks.
    No further steps. Face ID unlocks your iPhone, period.
    That's not accurate. Not only are there are more additional steps to being able to use Face ID, Face ID doesn't "unlock the phone itself," it only unlocks the phone within set parameters after the passcode has been inputted first which tells the device it can start to allow Face ID to be used. You can't even setup Face ID until you have created at least a 6-digit PIN because the PIN is the fallback for device security if you restart the device, if too much time has passed between unlocking the device, and if there have been too many failed attempts to unlock the device using Face ID. You also use that PIN access the Settings area if you wish to alter the Face ID setup.
    It's the same with TouchID, you need to setup passcode beforehand. The difference though, you need to do multiple finger printing, the process that seems much slower, longer and annoying compare to setting up the FaceID (from what I've seen on the video, at least) which only requires moving your head to complete the full circle.
  • Reply 149 of 153
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,969member
    adonissmu said:
    Soli said:
    lkrupp said:
    Hi all, new member here and long time reader of this site :)

    I have a question maybe somebody could answer regarding this iPhone and its facial recognition - after the recognition is confirmed, is there any further security step (Pin code etc) that needs to be performed ? Or does the face recognition itself unlock the phone ?

    Thanks.
    No further steps. Face ID unlocks your iPhone, period.
    That's not accurate. Not only are there are more additional steps to being able to use Face ID, Face ID doesn't "unlock the phone itself," it only unlocks the phone within set parameters after the passcode has been inputted first which tells the device it can start to allow Face ID to be used. You can't even setup Face ID until you have created at least a 6-digit PIN because the PIN is the fallback for device security if you restart the device, if too much time has passed between unlocking the device, and if there have been too many failed attempts to unlock the device using Face ID. You also use that PIN access the Settings area if you wish to alter the Face ID setup.
    The same is true for touchID. So yeah there are not additional steps to use FaceID. In fact every reviewer noted that it was easier to set up FaceID than TouchID. 
    kevin kee said:
    Soli said:
    lkrupp said:
    Hi all, new member here and long time reader of this site :)

    I have a question maybe somebody could answer regarding this iPhone and its facial recognition - after the recognition is confirmed, is there any further security step (Pin code etc) that needs to be performed ? Or does the face recognition itself unlock the phone ?

    Thanks.
    No further steps. Face ID unlocks your iPhone, period.
    That's not accurate. Not only are there are more additional steps to being able to use Face ID, Face ID doesn't "unlock the phone itself," it only unlocks the phone within set parameters after the passcode has been inputted first which tells the device it can start to allow Face ID to be used. You can't even setup Face ID until you have created at least a 6-digit PIN because the PIN is the fallback for device security if you restart the device, if too much time has passed between unlocking the device, and if there have been too many failed attempts to unlock the device using Face ID. You also use that PIN access the Settings area if you wish to alter the Face ID setup.
    It's the same with TouchID, you need to setup passcode beforehand. The difference though, you need to do multiple finger printing, the process that seems much slower, longer and annoying compare to setting up the FaceID (from what I've seen on the video, at least) which only requires moving your head to complete the full circle.
    Did you two even read the original comment? He didn't ask how it differs from Touch ID—he didn't reference Touch ID at all—he asked about further steps and specifically used a PIN as an example, so a statement of "no" is blatantly false and saying "but Touch ID has the same steps" is irrelevant to the discussion and a weird defense when no one is pooh-poohing Face ID.
    gatorguy
  • Reply 150 of 153
    I don’t need to read “equally valid alternative approaches” in an article because I am able to consider, evaluate and verify those “equally valid alternative approaches” personally. I read an article to acquire some knowledge and I am not offended if that knowledge is presented along with the author’s clearly specified personal views and commentaries. In providing that knowledge the author didn’t disappoint me to date. This is a tech site that strives to provide information on daily developments. If your intellectual scope is much larger than that I’d refer you to iTunes U for Humanities and “equally valid alternative approaches”.
    Fair enough. I may need to re-evaluate my expectations.
  • Reply 151 of 153
    Thanks for the replies. Im curious about the Face ID and unlocking. I have not seen the phone (Other than online bits and pieces).

    I'm remembering back a few months when there were lots of press reports regarding law enforcement and other security related agencies who pressed Apple for easier ways to access iPhones and wanted backdoors built in to the code and tools to unlock them etc.

    If the Face ID alone can be used to unlock the phone, whats to stop a law enforcement person arresting a suspect, seizing his iphone and then just waving it in front of the suspects face to unlock it, whether or not permission is given ?
  • Reply 152 of 153
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,969member
    Thanks for the replies. Im curious about the Face ID and unlocking. I have not seen the phone (Other than online bits and pieces).

    I'm remembering back a few months when there were lots of press reports regarding law enforcement and other security related agencies who pressed Apple for easier ways to access iPhones and wanted backdoors built in to the code and tools to unlock them etc.

    If the Face ID alone can be used to unlock the phone, whats to stop a law enforcement person arresting a suspect, seizing his iphone and then just waving it in front of the suspects face to unlock it, whether or not permission is given ?
    You are correct that this could be an issue, but this was also an issue with Touch ID since law enforcement can also compel someone to use their finger to unlock a device. What they can't do is compel someone to give up a memorized code.

    Now, with Touch ID law enforcement can easily pick the device without touching the Home Button so it's easy to not accidentally touch it too many times which then requires the passcode to re-enable Touch ID. With Face ID, on the other hand, it's very easy for law enforcement to grab the device and have it automatically try to unlock with their faces before it then requires the passcode to re-enable Face ID. That's the exact issue we saw with Craig Federighi demoing the Face ID at the September event.

    This means that law enforcement will have to be overtly aware of where they point the device so it doesn't lock, but the user still has their own security solution; you can press the Sleep/Wake button 5x to have it kill either Touch ID or Face ID instantly, thereby requiring a passcode to reactivate. This feature also brings up an SOS service.

    edited November 2017
  • Reply 153 of 153
    Soli said:
    lkrupp said:
    Hi all, new member here and long time reader of this site :)

    I have a question maybe somebody could answer regarding this iPhone and its facial recognition - after the recognition is confirmed, is there any further security step (Pin code etc) that needs to be performed ? Or does the face recognition itself unlock the phone ?

    Thanks.
    No further steps. Face ID unlocks your iPhone, period.
    That's not accurate. Not only are there are more additional steps to being able to use Face ID, Face ID doesn't "unlock the phone itself," it only unlocks the phone within set parameters after the passcode has been inputted first which tells the device it can start to allow Face ID to be used. You can't even setup Face ID until you have created at least a 6-digit PIN because the PIN is the fallback for device security if you restart the device, if too much time has passed between unlocking the device, and if there have been too many failed attempts to unlock the device using Face ID. You also use that PIN access the Settings area if you wish to alter the Face ID setup.
    What additional steps to unlock during normal use?

    Touch ID: 
    - touch sensor
    - push home button

    Face ID:
    - look at sensor
    - swipe-up home indicator

    ...two steps in either use case.
Sign In or Register to comment.