Third iPhone battery lawsuit says Apple used slowdowns to avoid fixing defects

123457»

Comments

  • Reply 121 of 130
    78Bandit said:
    .

    Your understanding would be exactly what a normal consumer would expect, but it appears Apple is actually doing something different.

    There are two battery test algorithms, one done by the phone to determine when to throttle and a second one to determine the 80% capacity done at an Apple store for warranty replacement. The results of the internal test are hidden from the user; the phone simply starts throttling with no notice.  The internal threshold for instituting throttling is apparently quite a bit easier to trigger than the 80% Genius Bar test.  There have been numerous complaints of people with slow phones that were either under warranty or AppleCare who went into an Apple store and had their battery test fine, yet when they paid for a replacement battery from a third party their phone performance returned to normal.

    That is basically the foundation of the lawsuit.  Apple is throttling devices that should be fixed under warranty to cover up for a hardware defect.  Customers are told the battery is good after an in-store test, yet the phone itself thinks otherwise and cuts peak performance by up to 50%. The 6 and the 6s are still being sold new, so if the throttling algorithm is kicking in on devices that are in-warranty then the consumer needs to be informed so they can get a replacement at Apple's expense.  It will be up to the courts to decide if there is enough evidence to support the claim Apple was covering this up deliberately.

    My personal guess is battery capacity isn't a factor in the internal throttling test at all.  I think the phone looks at instantaneous battery output voltage and when it falls below a preset limit it cuts the CPU power regardless of how well the battery otherwise performs.

    EDIT:  For the record I greatly approve of Apple's fix to avoid crashing on phones with out of spec batteries.  I've got a three-year-old iPhone 6 and would much rather have it clip the power rather than crash.  That said, it is out of warranty and on my dime to fix.  I thank Apple for implementing a method that allows my phone to function when it would have been crashing.  However, Apple should notify the consumer the battery is bad.  It is that lack of transparency that makes people believe Apple knew it was happening on in-warranty devices and deliberately kept it a secret.
    Yes, the facts look like the smoking gun that they needed for the class action suit.
  • Reply 122 of 130
    bb-15 said:

    * I'm able to make comparisons between companies. 
    - Google with the Pixel 2XL knowingly sold a defective screen which quickly has burnin issues. Google denies there is a problem.

    http://indianexpress.com/article/technology/mobile-tabs/google-pixel-2-xl-screen-burn-in-issue-is-in-line-with-other-premium-phones-extends-warranty-to-2-years/

    - Apple does not sell phones which have screen burnin after a few days.

    Also, Apple is addressing the issue of wear and tear on the iPhone 6. They offer a low cost battery replacement option. Apple is trying to fix the shutdown problem in software. 

    - From my view, I prefer dealing with Apple over Google. 

     

    Why do people always drag other companies into the question if something is wrong or not when considering another company. OK, it might be a BITrelevant but mostly its just an OBSERVATION, and nothing else. Its like saying that because "my neighbour wont sort his garbage", or "Chinese polute so much" that I dont need to be better at what I´m doing.  :D
  • Reply 123 of 130
    So, if it LOOK LIKE you robbed a bank, the cops should put you in jail?  
    I guess that's how it works in today's post-factual world.   So sad...
    Ok, so how do you mean it "looked like" you robbed the bank, its getting a bit intresting now please explain you theory on comparison?

    You where cought on video with your licence plate and face with a shotgun in a bank and cought with the loot? :D

    PS. normally what it looks like is going to be determined in a court of law with some kind of proof?
    edited December 2017
  • Reply 124 of 130
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,985member
    bb-15 said:

    * I'm able to make comparisons between companies. 
    - Google with the Pixel 2XL knowingly sold a defective screen which quickly has burnin issues. Google denies there is a problem.

    http://indianexpress.com/article/technology/mobile-tabs/google-pixel-2-xl-screen-burn-in-issue-is-in-line-with-other-premium-phones-extends-warranty-to-2-years/

    - Apple does not sell phones which have screen burnin after a few days.

    Also, Apple is addressing the issue of wear and tear on the iPhone 6. They offer a low cost battery replacement option. Apple is trying to fix the shutdown problem in software. 

    - From my view, I prefer dealing with Apple over Google. 

     

    Why do people always drag other companies into the question if something is wrong or not when considering another company. OK, it might be a BITrelevant but mostly its just an OBSERVATION, and nothing else. Its like saying that because "my neighbour wont sort his garbage", or "Chinese polute so much" that I dont need to be better at what I´m doing.  :D
    Because whataboutism is all the rage nowadays. 
  • Reply 125 of 130
    interdyne said:
    Making this change to prevent shut downs makes sense. NOT telling customers about it is unforgivable. This is going to cost Apple in reputation, legal fees and settlements.
    They do tell you in the Settings app. My friends 6 had his battery replaced after he saw the warning in the Battery section of settings.
  • Reply 126 of 130
    zomp said:
    I’m all in for this suit - according to Apple there was nothing wrong with my phone and if I wanted to replace the battery it would cost X.  All it does is shit down spontaneously. When I go to restart it says it’s a dead battery - the second the charger is attached, the battery is back at 75%
    If your phone was out of warranty then yeah its going to cost you. But Apple said battery not phone. Which goes against almost every suit that has been filed, as they claim this whole thing is a stunt to make you buy a new iPhone. Clearly they didn’t in your case
  • Reply 127 of 130
    I've been using Apple products since PowerPC era. Converted many PC users to Apple machines. I could be considered an Apple fanboy. Unfortunately Apple is making it harder and harder for people like me. That is why, the iPhone i own will be the last one.
  • Reply 128 of 130
    Apple should countersue frivolous lawsuit filers.
  • Reply 129 of 130
    danvm said:
    Soli said:
    r2d2 said:
    Soli said:

    If any of that was true then they WOULDN"'T ALLOW OLDER DEVICES TO GET THE LATEST OSES AND FEATURES AT ALL! This means less work for Apple and more feature envy for customers with older devices. Do you people ever think before you post?
    Did you think before posting this?! Less work for Apple?!! It would mean less money for Apple. Pay attention - this has been and is happening whether you like it of not. What do you mean, "they wouldn't allow" that to happen - they have and didn't say a word about it to clue people in. Deal with the reality of the situation.
    Apple spends many millions of dollars in adopting, testing and supporting iOS for older devices… but you think this is at no charge for Apple.
    Apple now has older iPhones going back up to 5 years that have new features which keeps customers using older devices… but you think that users being stuck on an antiquated OS would hinder a desire to get new iPhones with new HW and SW features.

    Instead. you create a conspiracy theory that Apple gives users new features and then makes devices not work so that myopic dipshits like you believe that an old device with an old battery is somehow purposely and maliciously hindered in SW so you're forced to buy a new device despite your claims that it's just driving you to drop Apple entirely. What a reasonable comment¡
    I'm not sure how much Apple tests their latest iOS versions in old devices.  In my personal experience, "upgrading" a +3 years old device is not necessarily for the better.  The performance hit is noticeable, and many times it would be better if I had it left with the previos versions.  But since Apple force users to keep the latest iOS version, the only option you have to recover the performance is replacing the device.  And this experience applies to iPhone and iPads.
    Wrong. You make a backup before you update the device. If things don’t work out for the better, you revert to the backup. I believe you are given ample warning prior to all updates.
  • Reply 130 of 130
    larrya said:
    This is the one with legs.  Though the iPhone 6/6+ aren’t new, some recently purchased phones saw the slowdowns while the battery still tested “good” at the Apple store (based on comments on the subject here over the last couple of days).   A judge will decide based on the preponderance of evidence, which is:

    - a previously admitted battery flaw and replacement program
    - a previous admission that the shutdown problem grew to affect other models
    - a newly admitted slowdown algorithm that kicks in before the Genius Bar says the battery is eligible for replacement 
    - performance results that are half of the phone’s performance when new

    In this context it will be very difficult for Apple to claim their motivation was user experience, since it sucks anyway at half-speed. 




    -flaw was due to defective batteries used in manufacturing/not likely to be relevant
    -that admission may be more about aging batteries than defective batteries/relevance remains to be seen
    -slowdown is specific to voltage issues, lithium ion batteries begin to have a steep voltage drop at 20% charge or lower/relevant, but Apple's liability seems limited
    -benchmark software automatically triggers throttling regardless of voltage level/not relevant, proof would be a standard app that is slowed down by half with nominal voltage.
    edited January 2018 Soli
Sign In or Register to comment.