Ill-informed YouTuber bemoans Apple repair policies after breaking iMac Pro

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Comments

  • Reply 221 of 228
    I see a cracked screen...

    How is it possible all the parts listed are actually damaged?

    Did it get hit by lightning?  It sounds like Apple didn’t have the parts or experience to make the repairs.

    Is the damage Apple’s fault?  Obviously not.  But the Apple Store should be able to send it somewhere to get fixed, and not for $5000+.

    This story is embarrassing for Apple...
    They say in the video that it required a power supply, a motherboard, and the display. They really damaged it when putting it back together. They aren't at all disagreeing with what needs repaired, and are in fact the ones who confirm what parts were damaged.

    So two things. The third-party repair shop lied to get out of doing the repair because the repair certification has been available since before they asked, and the parts that were needed were available about a month or two after they went in to inquire about it. It sometimes takes a bit after launch for parts to make their way through the system and made available to stores and third-party repair shops.

    If they went in with the Pro today, chances are it would be able to be repaired. But remember, at this point, the only thing that is left without needing repair is basically a shell, some ram, and the SSD. The rest is shot and needing to be replaced. It would have been cheaper to buy a new one.

    The video is really just clickbait and hammed up for the camera.
    I think the moral of the story is don’t buy an “all in one” iMac Pro from Apple.  Those parts shouldn’t have been more than $1500, unless they did something stupid and soldered the processor to the motherboard.

    If you buy a Pro machine, everything should be able to be swapped out: the CPU, GPU, drive, ram, etc. (no the CPU probably isn’t upgradable for a reasonable amount).

    The “can’t be upgraded” bit them in the ass.  This is a poor design for a Pro machine.
    Ah look, he’s an armchair electrical engineer and armchair logistics expert too. Impressive. 
     The moral of the story is don't take apart something you have no clue how to do in the first place. Then try an blame Apple. The machine is not a poor design, but the people that tried to take it apart were not qualified to do so and should not have attempted it in the first place. If there was an issue with it they had two choices, bring it to an Apple store or call AppleCare to get it fixed under warranty at no cost. 
    liquidmark
  • Reply 222 of 228
    NettoNetto Posts: 1unconfirmed, member
    You release a PRODUCT, but you can't afford of their SERVICE ?? Why would you release them anyway ?? Duh... Apple Bites...
  • Reply 223 of 228
    liquidmarkliquidmark Posts: 107member
    Netto said:
    You release a PRODUCT, but you can't afford of their SERVICE ?? Why would you release them anyway ?? Duh... Apple Bites...
    Apple can afford to service iMac Pros just fine. It would be nice if you actually read the article or any of the comments over the last 12 pages instead of what you’re doing here.
    edited May 3 fastasleep
  • Reply 224 of 228
    palladiumpalladium Posts: 6member
    Hell, I'm would be surprised if I see any popular Youtuber who isn't an obnoxious clickbait spewing manchild cum attention seeker.

    I'm a PC DIYer for 17 years already and even I despise LTT and his followers for above reasons.
    edited May 8
  • Reply 225 of 228
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 2,544administrator
    As a reminder, we have forum rules for a reason. Disagree all you like -- as long as you obey them.
  • Reply 226 of 228
    crowleycrowley Posts: 5,372member
    crowley said:
    crosslad said:
    The cost of individual parts and labour can easily cost more than buying a new computer. This is why, when I crashed my 4 year old car a few years back, the insurance company wrote it off as the cost of the new wing, bumper, lighting unit and respray would have cost more than the car was worth. 
    You really think the display panel, PSU and (maybe) motherboard cost more than (minimum) $5000?

    Really?

    Besides which, this was not the stated reason, so is irrelevant.
    They do. 

    FTA, and confirmed with four different, independent sources, the panel and motherboard ordered from Apple, with a return of the core and broken part costs $5200. Labor will add to that, and parts markup by a shop could make it even more.
    That's two parts priced higher than the whole iMac Pro that includes those parts, from the same vendor!  Doesn't seem likely.  Maybe those are the prices Apple charges third parties, but they're not the cost to Apple.  Or possibly Apple hasn't sorted out an efficient supply chain of spare parts for the iMac Pro yet.

    Do shops normally mark up parts in the US?  I would expect the shop's margin to be covered in the labour cost.  Labour cost of replacing the display shouldn't be all that high, it's an easily removable and replaceable part.  PSU may be trickier.
  • Reply 227 of 228
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 2,544administrator
    crowley said:
    crowley said:
    crosslad said:
    The cost of individual parts and labour can easily cost more than buying a new computer. This is why, when I crashed my 4 year old car a few years back, the insurance company wrote it off as the cost of the new wing, bumper, lighting unit and respray would have cost more than the car was worth. 
    You really think the display panel, PSU and (maybe) motherboard cost more than (minimum) $5000?

    Really?

    Besides which, this was not the stated reason, so is irrelevant.
    They do. 

    FTA, and confirmed with four different, independent sources, the panel and motherboard ordered from Apple, with a return of the core and broken part costs $5200. Labor will add to that, and parts markup by a shop could make it even more.
    That's two parts priced higher than the whole iMac Pro that includes those parts, from the same vendor!  Doesn't seem likely.  Maybe those are the prices Apple charges third parties, but they're not the cost to Apple.  Or possibly Apple hasn't sorted out an efficient supply chain of spare parts for the iMac Pro yet.

    Do shops normally mark up parts in the US?  I would expect the shop's margin to be covered in the labour cost.  Labour cost of replacing the display shouldn't be all that high, it's an easily removable and replaceable part.  PSU may be trickier.
    Examining cost-effectiveness of a repair has nothing to do with Apple's production cost for the parts -- only what it charges customers. Shops can, and do mark up parts. The job, including screen, motherboard, and power supply has been estimated to us as between 2.5 and 3 man-hours of labor.

    Apple's supply chain of spare parts for the iMac Pro is fine. The third-party shop gave LTT an excuse.
    Soli
  • Reply 228 of 228
    macguimacgui Posts: 733member
    Wow. Just wow. I can't believe the continued uninformed comments. I have to commend AI staff for hanging in so long and
    explaining things to not only those who didn't understand the facts, but to those who continue to not get it, arguing against facts the LTT staff has already stipulated.

    It's been interesting. Again, I don't know how you AI guys do it, but I've had enough. 
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