Ill-informed YouTuber bemoans Apple repair policies after breaking iMac Pro

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  • Reply 221 of 275
    horvatichorvatic Posts: 101member
    I see a cracked screen...

    How is it possible all the parts listed are actually damaged?

    Did it get hit by lightning?  It sounds like Apple didn’t have the parts or experience to make the repairs.

    Is the damage Apple’s fault?  Obviously not.  But the Apple Store should be able to send it somewhere to get fixed, and not for $5000+.

    This story is embarrassing for Apple...
    They say in the video that it required a power supply, a motherboard, and the display. They really damaged it when putting it back together. They aren't at all disagreeing with what needs repaired, and are in fact the ones who confirm what parts were damaged.

    So two things. The third-party repair shop lied to get out of doing the repair because the repair certification has been available since before they asked, and the parts that were needed were available about a month or two after they went in to inquire about it. It sometimes takes a bit after launch for parts to make their way through the system and made available to stores and third-party repair shops.

    If they went in with the Pro today, chances are it would be able to be repaired. But remember, at this point, the only thing that is left without needing repair is basically a shell, some ram, and the SSD. The rest is shot and needing to be replaced. It would have been cheaper to buy a new one.

    The video is really just clickbait and hammed up for the camera.
    I think the moral of the story is don’t buy an “all in one” iMac Pro from Apple.  Those parts shouldn’t have been more than $1500, unless they did something stupid and soldered the processor to the motherboard.

    If you buy a Pro machine, everything should be able to be swapped out: the CPU, GPU, drive, ram, etc. (no the CPU probably isn’t upgradable for a reasonable amount).

    The “can’t be upgraded” bit them in the ass.  This is a poor design for a Pro machine.
    Ah look, he’s an armchair electrical engineer and armchair logistics expert too. Impressive. 
     The moral of the story is don't take apart something you have no clue how to do in the first place. Then try an blame Apple. The machine is not a poor design, but the people that tried to take it apart were not qualified to do so and should not have attempted it in the first place. If there was an issue with it they had two choices, bring it to an Apple store or call AppleCare to get it fixed under warranty at no cost. 
    liquidmark
  • Reply 222 of 275
    NettoNetto Posts: 1unconfirmed, member
    You release a PRODUCT, but you can't afford of their SERVICE ?? Why would you release them anyway ?? Duh... Apple Bites...
    MorganEarp
  • Reply 223 of 275
    liquidmarkliquidmark Posts: 111member
    Netto said:
    You release a PRODUCT, but you can't afford of their SERVICE ?? Why would you release them anyway ?? Duh... Apple Bites...
    Apple can afford to service iMac Pros just fine. It would be nice if you actually read the article or any of the comments over the last 12 pages instead of what you’re doing here.
    edited May 3 fastasleep
  • Reply 224 of 275
    palladiumpalladium Posts: 6member
    Hell, I'm would be surprised if I see any popular Youtuber who isn't an obnoxious clickbait spewing manchild cum attention seeker.

    I'm a PC DIYer for 17 years already and even I despise LTT and his followers for above reasons.
    edited May 8
  • Reply 225 of 275
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,303administrator
    As a reminder, we have forum rules for a reason. Disagree all you like -- as long as you obey them.
  • Reply 226 of 275
    crowleycrowley Posts: 5,538member
    crowley said:
    crosslad said:
    The cost of individual parts and labour can easily cost more than buying a new computer. This is why, when I crashed my 4 year old car a few years back, the insurance company wrote it off as the cost of the new wing, bumper, lighting unit and respray would have cost more than the car was worth. 
    You really think the display panel, PSU and (maybe) motherboard cost more than (minimum) $5000?

    Really?

    Besides which, this was not the stated reason, so is irrelevant.
    They do. 

    FTA, and confirmed with four different, independent sources, the panel and motherboard ordered from Apple, with a return of the core and broken part costs $5200. Labor will add to that, and parts markup by a shop could make it even more.
    That's two parts priced higher than the whole iMac Pro that includes those parts, from the same vendor!  Doesn't seem likely.  Maybe those are the prices Apple charges third parties, but they're not the cost to Apple.  Or possibly Apple hasn't sorted out an efficient supply chain of spare parts for the iMac Pro yet.

    Do shops normally mark up parts in the US?  I would expect the shop's margin to be covered in the labour cost.  Labour cost of replacing the display shouldn't be all that high, it's an easily removable and replaceable part.  PSU may be trickier.
    MorganEarp
  • Reply 227 of 275
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,303administrator
    crowley said:
    crowley said:
    crosslad said:
    The cost of individual parts and labour can easily cost more than buying a new computer. This is why, when I crashed my 4 year old car a few years back, the insurance company wrote it off as the cost of the new wing, bumper, lighting unit and respray would have cost more than the car was worth. 
    You really think the display panel, PSU and (maybe) motherboard cost more than (minimum) $5000?

    Really?

    Besides which, this was not the stated reason, so is irrelevant.
    They do. 

    FTA, and confirmed with four different, independent sources, the panel and motherboard ordered from Apple, with a return of the core and broken part costs $5200. Labor will add to that, and parts markup by a shop could make it even more.
    That's two parts priced higher than the whole iMac Pro that includes those parts, from the same vendor!  Doesn't seem likely.  Maybe those are the prices Apple charges third parties, but they're not the cost to Apple.  Or possibly Apple hasn't sorted out an efficient supply chain of spare parts for the iMac Pro yet.

    Do shops normally mark up parts in the US?  I would expect the shop's margin to be covered in the labour cost.  Labour cost of replacing the display shouldn't be all that high, it's an easily removable and replaceable part.  PSU may be trickier.
    Examining cost-effectiveness of a repair has nothing to do with Apple's production cost for the parts -- only what it charges customers. Shops can, and do mark up parts. The job, including screen, motherboard, and power supply has been estimated to us as between 2.5 and 3 man-hours of labor.

    Apple's supply chain of spare parts for the iMac Pro is fine. The third-party shop gave LTT an excuse.
    Soli
  • Reply 228 of 275
    macguimacgui Posts: 889member
    Wow. Just wow. I can't believe the continued uninformed comments. I have to commend AI staff for hanging in so long and
    explaining things to not only those who didn't understand the facts, but to those who continue to not get it, arguing against facts the LTT staff has already stipulated.

    It's been interesting. Again, I don't know how you AI guys do it, but I've had enough. 
  • Reply 229 of 275
    NIkku-kunNIkku-kun Posts: 1unconfirmed, member
    The significant issue here lies in the fact that Apple and other tech companies are producing products that are significantly difficult or impossible to fix without a room full of equipment. If compaines will be designing their products in a way (intentionally or otherwise) that requires consumers to return for any and all repairs on the products, these companies have an obligation to repair these products. This is particularly the case if a consmer returns for repairs - even willing to pay for repairs outside of warranty coverage - but abandoned instead.

    One can argue all day companies have the right to create any terms of sale they desire and consumers can choose other products if they don't approve of such terms. Yet, the reality is the competition for these products is scarce, and a company unwilling to repair a repairable product because a consumer attempted repair on their own accord is absurd. I can understand an invalidation of the warranty, but leaving a consumer in a situation with a broken item and no options for repair is just wrong. It seems retaliatory in nature - as if Apple is punishing consumers for attempting repairs without Apple making its cut. Apple just shouldn't be allowed to engage in buisiness where they sell items that are designed in a way that requires repair by them; who's conditions for repair are solely at their unilateral discretion; restricting the sale of any and all parts for private repair; and potentially leave a consumer with a broken item (paperweight) that is artificially, arbitrarily irreparable. Its just not right for Apple to orchestrate a situation leading to this outcome. 
    MorganEarp
  • Reply 230 of 275
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,303administrator
    NIkku-kun said:
    The significant issue here lies in the fact that Apple and other tech companies are producing products that are significantly difficult or impossible to fix without a room full of equipment. If compaines will be designing their products in a way (intentionally or otherwise) that requires consumers to return for any and all repairs on the products, these companies have an obligation to repair these products. This is particularly the case if a consmer returns for repairs - even willing to pay for repairs outside of warranty coverage - but abandoned instead.

    One can argue all day companies have the right to create any terms of sale they desire and consumers can choose other products if they don't approve of such terms. Yet, the reality is the competition for these products is scarce, and a company unwilling to repair a repairable product because a consumer attempted repair on their own accord is absurd. I can understand an invalidation of the warranty, but leaving a consumer in a situation with a broken item and no options for repair is just wrong. It seems retaliatory in nature - as if Apple is punishing consumers for attempting repairs without Apple making its cut. Apple just shouldn't be allowed to engage in buisiness where they sell items that are designed in a way that requires repair by them; who's conditions for repair are solely at their unilateral discretion; restricting the sale of any and all parts for private repair; and potentially leave a consumer with a broken item (paperweight) that is artificially, arbitrarily irreparable. Its just not right for Apple to orchestrate a situation leading to this outcome. 
    I'm onboard with a great portion of this, but where it falls down some is LTT broke the machine -- user abuse -- when re-assembling it. 

    As time wears on, there will be more parts available. The same as it always has been.
    edited June 1
  • Reply 231 of 275
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,267member
    DAalseth said:
    We Reserve The Right To Refuse Service This is the final out for any company doing business with the public.  
    The EU is planning to change that as early as this summer.
  • Reply 232 of 275
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,303administrator
    gatorguy said:
    DAalseth said:
    We Reserve The Right To Refuse Service This is the final out for any company doing business with the public.  
    The EU is planning to change that as early as this summer.
    I don't think they can, completely. There are outs in the proposal for consumer or technician safety.
  • Reply 233 of 275
    AwayforthewinAwayforthewin Posts: 1unconfirmed, member
    sunman42 said:
    I see a cracked screen...

    How is it possible all the parts listed are actually damaged?

    Did it get hit by lightning?  It sounds like Apple didn’t have the parts or experience to make the repairs.

    Is the damage Apple’s fault?  Obviously not.  But the Apple Store should be able to send it somewhere to get fixed, and not for $5000+.

    This story is embarrassing for Apple...
    Oh, puh-lease. They only people who should be embarrassed are the yutzes who didn't know how to take proper care in reassembling the machine, and went ahead and tried anyway. The recent court ruling voiding "Don't you dare remove this label or your warranty will be voided" labels did not cover bozos breaking their own hardware.
    They werent asking for a free pair bozo, they offered to pay for it and apple refused to repair it at all. And this isnt just some random youtuber. This is a milion dollar company that take apart computers as their job
    MorganEarp
  • Reply 234 of 275
    Finn 2003Finn 2003 Posts: 1unconfirmed, member
    This article is garbage and it sounds more like the person who wrote the article is ill-informed not the youtuber.
    MorganEarp
  • Reply 235 of 275
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,303administrator
    Finn 2003 said:
    This article is garbage and it sounds more like the person who wrote the article is ill-informed not the youtuber.
    He may disagree with our opinion on his original video, but there's no contesting the facts. You're aware that Linus confirmed the exchange pricing to dealers, and the fact that training was available, right? 

    Next time, read the article before you comment.
    edited July 10
  • Reply 236 of 275
    NooNameNooName Posts: 3member
    Finn 2003 said:
    This article is garbage and it sounds more like the person who wrote the article is ill-informed not the youtuber.
    He may disagree with our opinion on his original video, but there's no contesting the facts. You're aware that Linus confirmed the exchange pricing to dealers, and the fact that training was available, right? 

    Next time, read the article before you comment.
    Maybe you should watch their new video where he goes through your article with "facts".
    MorganEarp
  • Reply 237 of 275
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,303administrator
    NooName said:
    Finn 2003 said:
    This article is garbage and it sounds more like the person who wrote the article is ill-informed not the youtuber.
    He may disagree with our opinion on his original video, but there's no contesting the facts. You're aware that Linus confirmed the exchange pricing to dealers, and the fact that training was available, right? 

    Next time, read the article before you comment.
    Maybe you should watch their new video where he goes through your article with "facts".
    I did.

    He may not like what Apple charges AASPs for parts, but that's irrefutable. He talks about that, and the exchange process for AASPs, in the middle of the piece, and the reality for them as a result.

    He's welcome to his opinion, obviously. But, I'm glad he took the time to educate himself how things are for AASPs.

    And, for his "free" part that from a friend of a friend of a friend, as he put it after the core exchange? It's not a surprise that the difference between the price between a non-core replacement, and one with a core replacement is... $2000.
    edited July 10
  • Reply 238 of 275
    NooNameNooName Posts: 3member
    Is he lying in that one too, according to YOU?
    MorganEarp
  • Reply 239 of 275
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,303administrator
    NooName said:
    Is he lying in that one too, according to YOU?
    I didn't say in this piece that LTT lied. That's from somebody else's article.

    From this one:

    "Service Providers have training available now

    At one point in the video, after Apple itself suggested that the venue talk to a third-party shop, the group was told that training for the repair for the iMac Pro wasn't available. This is false, and likely used by the shop to dodge the repair. Training materials have been available since before the iMac Pro launched, with some components able to be ordered in January, with the rest ready in early March."

    Which you'd know if you read this piece.
    edited July 10
  • Reply 240 of 275
    NooNameNooName Posts: 3member
    Probably. But I'm not going to. Stopped reading your articles a while back.
    MorganEarp
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