Ill-informed YouTuber bemoans Apple repair policies after breaking iMac Pro

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Comments

  • Reply 261 of 267
    tundraboy said:
    I see a cracked screen...

    How is it possible all the parts listed are actually damaged?

    Did it get hit by lightning?  It sounds like Apple didn’t have the parts or experience to make the repairs.

    Is the damage Apple’s fault?  Obviously not.  But the Apple Store should be able to send it somewhere to get fixed, and not for $5000+.

    This story is embarrassing for Apple...
    They say in the video that it required a power supply, a motherboard, and the display. They really damaged it when putting it back together. They aren't at all disagreeing with what needs repaired, and are in fact the ones who confirm what parts were damaged.

    So two things. The third-party repair shop lied to get out of doing the repair because the repair certification has been available since before they asked, and the parts that were needed were available about a month or two after they went in to inquire about it. It sometimes takes a bit after launch for parts to make their way through the system and made available to stores and third-party repair shops.

    If they went in with the Pro today, chances are it would be able to be repaired. But remember, at this point, the only thing that is left without needing repair is basically a shell, some ram, and the SSD. The rest is shot and needing to be replaced. It would have been cheaper to buy a new one.

    The video is really just clickbait and hammed up for the camera.
    I think the moral of the story is don’t buy an “all in one” iMac Pro from Apple.  Those parts shouldn’t have been more than $1500, unless they did something stupid and soldered the processor to the motherboard.

    If you buy a Pro machine, everything should be able to be swapped out: the CPU, GPU, drive, ram, etc. (no the CPU probably isn’t upgradable for a reasonable amount).

    The “can’t be upgraded” bit them in the ass.  This is a poor design for a Pro machine.
    Ah look, he’s an armchair electrical engineer and armchair logistics expert too. Impressive. 
    He's an armchair marketing and sales genius too because he knows just exactly what features all Pro users require of a Pro machine.
    I’m neither a spokesmen nor give a fck about ifixit
    irs about morals...you wanna act like rejecting people formhwlpmiamokat I’m some business principal or being a LTT lover then your as smart and you thingy are



  • Reply 262 of 267
    liquidmarkliquidmark Posts: 111member
    Golden86 said:
    tundraboy said:
    I see a cracked screen...

    How is it possible all the parts listed are actually damaged?

    Did it get hit by lightning?  It sounds like Apple didn’t have the parts or experience to make the repairs.

    Is the damage Apple’s fault?  Obviously not.  But the Apple Store should be able to send it somewhere to get fixed, and not for $5000+.

    This story is embarrassing for Apple...
    They say in the video that it required a power supply, a motherboard, and the display. They really damaged it when putting it back together. They aren't at all disagreeing with what needs repaired, and are in fact the ones who confirm what parts were damaged.

    So two things. The third-party repair shop lied to get out of doing the repair because the repair certification has been available since before they asked, and the parts that were needed were available about a month or two after they went in to inquire about it. It sometimes takes a bit after launch for parts to make their way through the system and made available to stores and third-party repair shops.

    If they went in with the Pro today, chances are it would be able to be repaired. But remember, at this point, the only thing that is left without needing repair is basically a shell, some ram, and the SSD. The rest is shot and needing to be replaced. It would have been cheaper to buy a new one.

    The video is really just clickbait and hammed up for the camera.
    I think the moral of the story is don’t buy an “all in one” iMac Pro from Apple.  Those parts shouldn’t have been more than $1500, unless they did something stupid and soldered the processor to the motherboard.

    If you buy a Pro machine, everything should be able to be swapped out: the CPU, GPU, drive, ram, etc. (no the CPU probably isn’t upgradable for a reasonable amount).

    The “can’t be upgraded” bit them in the ass.  This is a poor design for a Pro machine.
    Ah look, he’s an armchair electrical engineer and armchair logistics expert too. Impressive. 
    He's an armchair marketing and sales genius too because he knows just exactly what features all Pro users require of a Pro machine.
    I’m neither a spokesmen nor give a fck about ifixit
    irs about morals...you wanna act like rejecting people formhwlpmiamokat I’m some business principal or being a LTT lover then your as smart and you thingy are





    What did i just read?
  • Reply 263 of 267
    Golden86 said:
    tundraboy said:
    I see a cracked screen...

    How is it possible all the parts listed are actually damaged?

    Did it get hit by lightning?  It sounds like Apple didn’t have the parts or experience to make the repairs.

    Is the damage Apple’s fault?  Obviously not.  But the Apple Store should be able to send it somewhere to get fixed, and not for $5000+.

    This story is embarrassing for Apple...
    They say in the video that it required a power supply, a motherboard, and the display. They really damaged it when putting it back together. They aren't at all disagreeing with what needs repaired, and are in fact the ones who confirm what parts were damaged.

    So two things. The third-party repair shop lied to get out of doing the repair because the repair certification has been available since before they asked, and the parts that were needed were available about a month or two after they went in to inquire about it. It sometimes takes a bit after launch for parts to make their way through the system and made available to stores and third-party repair shops.

    If they went in with the Pro today, chances are it would be able to be repaired. But remember, at this point, the only thing that is left without needing repair is basically a shell, some ram, and the SSD. The rest is shot and needing to be replaced. It would have been cheaper to buy a new one.

    The video is really just clickbait and hammed up for the camera.
    I think the moral of the story is don’t buy an “all in one” iMac Pro from Apple.  Those parts shouldn’t have been more than $1500, unless they did something stupid and soldered the processor to the motherboard.

    If you buy a Pro machine, everything should be able to be swapped out: the CPU, GPU, drive, ram, etc. (no the CPU probably isn’t upgradable for a reasonable amount).

    The “can’t be upgraded” bit them in the ass.  This is a poor design for a Pro machine.
    Ah look, he’s an armchair electrical engineer and armchair logistics expert too. Impressive. 
    He's an armchair marketing and sales genius too because he knows just exactly what features all Pro users require of a Pro machine.
    I’m neither a spokesmen nor give a fck about ifixit
    irs about morals...you wanna act like rejecting people formhwlpmiamokat I’m some business principal or being a LTT lover then your as smart and you thingy are





    What did i just read?
    Did not proof read that lol. Or remember posting that? Disregard lol. Love the Spock gif btw..perfect response to gibberish.
    liquidmark
  • Reply 264 of 267
    JustinNJustinN Posts: 1unconfirmed, member
    "Driving into a lamp post isn't the same as cracking open the engine block and breaking something, while explaining how internal combustion works to a rapt YouTube audience."

    Yes, you're right; however, if I cracked open my engine block and broke something while explaining how internal combustion works to a rapt YouTube audience, and then took my car to a dealership, they'd fix it. 
  • Reply 265 of 267
    JustinN said:
    "Driving into a lamp post isn't the same as cracking open the engine block and breaking something, while explaining how internal combustion works to a rapt YouTube audience."

    Yes, you're right; however, if I cracked open my engine block and broke something while explaining how internal combustion works to a rapt YouTube audience, and then took my car to a dealership, they'd fix it. 
    Yeah, they’ll make you buy a new engine. If you break enough of your car, they’ll make you buy a new car. That’s the remedy toward fixing what Linus broke. Buying a new iMac Pro. If he had bought a new one, he wouldn’t be sitting there, 7 months later, with a non-working iMac Pro. It’s silly to expect Apple to repair it. They wouldn’t repair it if it were under warranty. They would simply replace it.
    edited July 17 inequals
  • Reply 266 of 267
    I'm obviously new here, but I've read through the article and all the comments thus far.  I have also watched the videos and since you seem to have contact with Apple and AASRs, I am generally curious about some of the issues that have been shown through all this.  I am writing here because of the tact you chose to take in the initial article and, therefore, I do believe you have a responsibility to continue to follow through to the end.

    You wrote you have communication with 15 AASRs and have been certified repairers in the past.  What rules, stipulations and most importantly penalties/fines does Apple place on AASRs?  Are they really penalized for speaking with people not associate with Apple about the parts and repair process, including losing their status and supply chain access?  Does Apple force sticker penalties on consumers and repair shops?  Will Apple not allow shops to keep basic socketd parts such as RAM, processors, SSDs, etc. and not supply shops the parts for up to weeks only after they ship the broken parts back?

    You've blammed Linus for lying & ommitting about the repair process in your article.  Is he actually telling the truth in the follow-up videos?  If there is no issue with shops communicating to others about this information, there should be no need to hide your sources.  If it is true that they could face penalties then by all means do not name them, but I do think you should report that his statements are true. 

    Again, you chose to write and publish this piece in the tone and style you did.  It should be only right that you either update said article to include the updates made in the videos or refute the new statements Linus has made.
    edited August 8
  • Reply 267 of 267
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,111administrator
    I'm obviously new here, but I've read through the article and all the comments thus far.  I have also watched the videos and since you seem to have contact with Apple and AASRs, I am generally curious about some of the issues that have been shown through all this.  I am writing here because of the tact you chose to take in the initial article and, therefore, I do believe you have a responsibility to continue to follow through to the end.

    You wrote you have communication with 15 AASRs and have been certified repairers in the past.  What rules, stipulations and most importantly penalties/fines does Apple place on AASRs?  Are they really penalized for speaking with people not associate with Apple about the parts and repair process, including losing their status and supply chain access?  Does Apple force sticker penalties on consumers and repair shops?  Will Apple not allow shops to keep basic socketd parts such as RAM, processors, SSDs, etc. and not supply shops the parts for up to weeks only after they ship the broken parts back?

    You've blammed Linus for lying & ommitting about the repair process in your article.  Is he actually telling the truth in the follow-up videos?  If there is no issue with shops communicating to others about this information, there should be no need to hide your sources.  If it is true that they could face penalties then by all means do not name them, but I do think you should report that his statements are true. 

    Again, you chose to write and publish this piece in the tone and style you did.  It should be only right that you either update said article to include the updates made in the videos or refute the new statements Linus has made.
    "What rules, stipulations and most importantly penalties/fines does Apple place on AASRs?" 

    I'm not sure what you're asking here. Apple will do what they please if they feel a AASP has broken the rules, up to and including fines, and revocation of authorized status. Some have been sued.

    "
    Are they really penalized for speaking with people not associate with Apple about the parts and repair process, including losing their status and supply chain access?" - 

    Most certainly yes, and Linus talked about this. Louis Rossman has a video recently talking to an AASP who confirms this as well.

    "
    Does Apple force sticker penalties on consumers and repair shops?" Like "warranty void if sticker is broken?"

    Apple doesn't care if you open your device, as long as it is put back together correctly, and not damaged in the process. Other than that, It depends. What are you asking specifically?

    "Will Apple not allow shops to keep basic socketed parts such as RAM, processors, SSDs, etc." -

    AASPs are not allowed to have a supply of spare parts from Apple stock, and pricing plus core return requirements make it financially untenable to do so. Apple Retail stores have different rules, but still don't stock a lot.

    AASPs can choose to use, and stock, third party RAM and the like, but obviously, it isn't covered under Apple warranty and won't be if the customer seeking repair goes to another shop.

    "and not supply shops the parts for up to weeks only after they ship the broken parts back?" -

    As this article talks about, the part order that a AASP requests is fedexed to the shop, and shipped in advance of Apple getting the broken part from the user's machine. The shop is expected to ship the core (broken) part back, and if it does not, it is billed for the non-core replacement price.


    Linus confirmed nearly everything we wrote in the article, in a follow-up video he published several months after the incident -- which I'm sure you're aware of. My point that the first video was irresponsible stands. His second video at least finally had details about the repair process, which should have been researched before he took the first video live.

    Oh, and for the record? We didn't say Linus lied. We said the repair shop was wrong about the "no iMac Pro training or parts" bit. The lie accusation was from another venue, that poor editing choices in the rebuttal video made look like was us. This makes me a little concerned that you didn't read our article before asking your questions, many of which were spelled out in the piece itself -- but I might be wrong about this part.
    edited August 8
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