Ill-informed YouTuber bemoans Apple repair policies after breaking iMac Pro

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Comments

  • Reply 261 of 279
    tundraboy said:
    I see a cracked screen...

    How is it possible all the parts listed are actually damaged?

    Did it get hit by lightning?  It sounds like Apple didn’t have the parts or experience to make the repairs.

    Is the damage Apple’s fault?  Obviously not.  But the Apple Store should be able to send it somewhere to get fixed, and not for $5000+.

    This story is embarrassing for Apple...
    They say in the video that it required a power supply, a motherboard, and the display. They really damaged it when putting it back together. They aren't at all disagreeing with what needs repaired, and are in fact the ones who confirm what parts were damaged.

    So two things. The third-party repair shop lied to get out of doing the repair because the repair certification has been available since before they asked, and the parts that were needed were available about a month or two after they went in to inquire about it. It sometimes takes a bit after launch for parts to make their way through the system and made available to stores and third-party repair shops.

    If they went in with the Pro today, chances are it would be able to be repaired. But remember, at this point, the only thing that is left without needing repair is basically a shell, some ram, and the SSD. The rest is shot and needing to be replaced. It would have been cheaper to buy a new one.

    The video is really just clickbait and hammed up for the camera.
    I think the moral of the story is don’t buy an “all in one” iMac Pro from Apple.  Those parts shouldn’t have been more than $1500, unless they did something stupid and soldered the processor to the motherboard.

    If you buy a Pro machine, everything should be able to be swapped out: the CPU, GPU, drive, ram, etc. (no the CPU probably isn’t upgradable for a reasonable amount).

    The “can’t be upgraded” bit them in the ass.  This is a poor design for a Pro machine.
    Ah look, he’s an armchair electrical engineer and armchair logistics expert too. Impressive. 
    He's an armchair marketing and sales genius too because he knows just exactly what features all Pro users require of a Pro machine.
    I’m neither a spokesmen nor give a fck about ifixit
    irs about morals...you wanna act like rejecting people formhwlpmiamokat I’m some business principal or being a LTT lover then your as smart and you thingy are



  • Reply 262 of 279
    liquidmarkliquidmark Posts: 111member
    Golden86 said:
    tundraboy said:
    I see a cracked screen...

    How is it possible all the parts listed are actually damaged?

    Did it get hit by lightning?  It sounds like Apple didn’t have the parts or experience to make the repairs.

    Is the damage Apple’s fault?  Obviously not.  But the Apple Store should be able to send it somewhere to get fixed, and not for $5000+.

    This story is embarrassing for Apple...
    They say in the video that it required a power supply, a motherboard, and the display. They really damaged it when putting it back together. They aren't at all disagreeing with what needs repaired, and are in fact the ones who confirm what parts were damaged.

    So two things. The third-party repair shop lied to get out of doing the repair because the repair certification has been available since before they asked, and the parts that were needed were available about a month or two after they went in to inquire about it. It sometimes takes a bit after launch for parts to make their way through the system and made available to stores and third-party repair shops.

    If they went in with the Pro today, chances are it would be able to be repaired. But remember, at this point, the only thing that is left without needing repair is basically a shell, some ram, and the SSD. The rest is shot and needing to be replaced. It would have been cheaper to buy a new one.

    The video is really just clickbait and hammed up for the camera.
    I think the moral of the story is don’t buy an “all in one” iMac Pro from Apple.  Those parts shouldn’t have been more than $1500, unless they did something stupid and soldered the processor to the motherboard.

    If you buy a Pro machine, everything should be able to be swapped out: the CPU, GPU, drive, ram, etc. (no the CPU probably isn’t upgradable for a reasonable amount).

    The “can’t be upgraded” bit them in the ass.  This is a poor design for a Pro machine.
    Ah look, he’s an armchair electrical engineer and armchair logistics expert too. Impressive. 
    He's an armchair marketing and sales genius too because he knows just exactly what features all Pro users require of a Pro machine.
    I’m neither a spokesmen nor give a fck about ifixit
    irs about morals...you wanna act like rejecting people formhwlpmiamokat I’m some business principal or being a LTT lover then your as smart and you thingy are





    What did i just read?
  • Reply 263 of 279
    Golden86 said:
    tundraboy said:
    I see a cracked screen...

    How is it possible all the parts listed are actually damaged?

    Did it get hit by lightning?  It sounds like Apple didn’t have the parts or experience to make the repairs.

    Is the damage Apple’s fault?  Obviously not.  But the Apple Store should be able to send it somewhere to get fixed, and not for $5000+.

    This story is embarrassing for Apple...
    They say in the video that it required a power supply, a motherboard, and the display. They really damaged it when putting it back together. They aren't at all disagreeing with what needs repaired, and are in fact the ones who confirm what parts were damaged.

    So two things. The third-party repair shop lied to get out of doing the repair because the repair certification has been available since before they asked, and the parts that were needed were available about a month or two after they went in to inquire about it. It sometimes takes a bit after launch for parts to make their way through the system and made available to stores and third-party repair shops.

    If they went in with the Pro today, chances are it would be able to be repaired. But remember, at this point, the only thing that is left without needing repair is basically a shell, some ram, and the SSD. The rest is shot and needing to be replaced. It would have been cheaper to buy a new one.

    The video is really just clickbait and hammed up for the camera.
    I think the moral of the story is don’t buy an “all in one” iMac Pro from Apple.  Those parts shouldn’t have been more than $1500, unless they did something stupid and soldered the processor to the motherboard.

    If you buy a Pro machine, everything should be able to be swapped out: the CPU, GPU, drive, ram, etc. (no the CPU probably isn’t upgradable for a reasonable amount).

    The “can’t be upgraded” bit them in the ass.  This is a poor design for a Pro machine.
    Ah look, he’s an armchair electrical engineer and armchair logistics expert too. Impressive. 
    He's an armchair marketing and sales genius too because he knows just exactly what features all Pro users require of a Pro machine.
    I’m neither a spokesmen nor give a fck about ifixit
    irs about morals...you wanna act like rejecting people formhwlpmiamokat I’m some business principal or being a LTT lover then your as smart and you thingy are





    What did i just read?
    Did not proof read that lol. Or remember posting that? Disregard lol. Love the Spock gif btw..perfect response to gibberish.
    liquidmark
  • Reply 264 of 279
    JustinNJustinN Posts: 1unconfirmed, member
    "Driving into a lamp post isn't the same as cracking open the engine block and breaking something, while explaining how internal combustion works to a rapt YouTube audience."

    Yes, you're right; however, if I cracked open my engine block and broke something while explaining how internal combustion works to a rapt YouTube audience, and then took my car to a dealership, they'd fix it. 
    MorganEarp
  • Reply 265 of 279
    JustinN said:
    "Driving into a lamp post isn't the same as cracking open the engine block and breaking something, while explaining how internal combustion works to a rapt YouTube audience."

    Yes, you're right; however, if I cracked open my engine block and broke something while explaining how internal combustion works to a rapt YouTube audience, and then took my car to a dealership, they'd fix it. 
    Yeah, they’ll make you buy a new engine. If you break enough of your car, they’ll make you buy a new car. That’s the remedy toward fixing what Linus broke. Buying a new iMac Pro. If he had bought a new one, he wouldn’t be sitting there, 7 months later, with a non-working iMac Pro. It’s silly to expect Apple to repair it. They wouldn’t repair it if it were under warranty. They would simply replace it.
    edited July 17 inequals
  • Reply 266 of 279
    I'm obviously new here, but I've read through the article and all the comments thus far.  I have also watched the videos and since you seem to have contact with Apple and AASRs, I am generally curious about some of the issues that have been shown through all this.  I am writing here because of the tact you chose to take in the initial article and, therefore, I do believe you have a responsibility to continue to follow through to the end.

    You wrote you have communication with 15 AASRs and have been certified repairers in the past.  What rules, stipulations and most importantly penalties/fines does Apple place on AASRs?  Are they really penalized for speaking with people not associate with Apple about the parts and repair process, including losing their status and supply chain access?  Does Apple force sticker penalties on consumers and repair shops?  Will Apple not allow shops to keep basic socketd parts such as RAM, processors, SSDs, etc. and not supply shops the parts for up to weeks only after they ship the broken parts back?

    You've blammed Linus for lying & ommitting about the repair process in your article.  Is he actually telling the truth in the follow-up videos?  If there is no issue with shops communicating to others about this information, there should be no need to hide your sources.  If it is true that they could face penalties then by all means do not name them, but I do think you should report that his statements are true. 

    Again, you chose to write and publish this piece in the tone and style you did.  It should be only right that you either update said article to include the updates made in the videos or refute the new statements Linus has made.
    edited August 8 MorganEarp
  • Reply 267 of 279
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,339administrator
    I'm obviously new here, but I've read through the article and all the comments thus far.  I have also watched the videos and since you seem to have contact with Apple and AASRs, I am generally curious about some of the issues that have been shown through all this.  I am writing here because of the tact you chose to take in the initial article and, therefore, I do believe you have a responsibility to continue to follow through to the end.

    You wrote you have communication with 15 AASRs and have been certified repairers in the past.  What rules, stipulations and most importantly penalties/fines does Apple place on AASRs?  Are they really penalized for speaking with people not associate with Apple about the parts and repair process, including losing their status and supply chain access?  Does Apple force sticker penalties on consumers and repair shops?  Will Apple not allow shops to keep basic socketd parts such as RAM, processors, SSDs, etc. and not supply shops the parts for up to weeks only after they ship the broken parts back?

    You've blammed Linus for lying & ommitting about the repair process in your article.  Is he actually telling the truth in the follow-up videos?  If there is no issue with shops communicating to others about this information, there should be no need to hide your sources.  If it is true that they could face penalties then by all means do not name them, but I do think you should report that his statements are true. 

    Again, you chose to write and publish this piece in the tone and style you did.  It should be only right that you either update said article to include the updates made in the videos or refute the new statements Linus has made.
    "What rules, stipulations and most importantly penalties/fines does Apple place on AASRs?" 

    I'm not sure what you're asking here. Apple will do what they please if they feel a AASP has broken the rules, up to and including fines, and revocation of authorized status. Some have been sued.

    "
    Are they really penalized for speaking with people not associate with Apple about the parts and repair process, including losing their status and supply chain access?" - 

    Most certainly yes, and Linus talked about this. Louis Rossman has a video recently talking to an AASP who confirms this as well.

    "
    Does Apple force sticker penalties on consumers and repair shops?" Like "warranty void if sticker is broken?"

    Apple doesn't care if you open your device, as long as it is put back together correctly, and not damaged in the process. Other than that, It depends. What are you asking specifically?

    "Will Apple not allow shops to keep basic socketed parts such as RAM, processors, SSDs, etc." -

    AASPs are not allowed to have a supply of spare parts from Apple stock, and pricing plus core return requirements make it financially untenable to do so. Apple Retail stores have different rules, but still don't stock a lot.

    AASPs can choose to use, and stock, third party RAM and the like, but obviously, it isn't covered under Apple warranty and won't be if the customer seeking repair goes to another shop.

    "and not supply shops the parts for up to weeks only after they ship the broken parts back?" -

    As this article talks about, the part order that a AASP requests is fedexed to the shop, and shipped in advance of Apple getting the broken part from the user's machine. The shop is expected to ship the core (broken) part back, and if it does not, it is billed for the non-core replacement price.


    Linus confirmed nearly everything we wrote in the article, in a follow-up video he published several months after the incident -- which I'm sure you're aware of. My point that the first video was irresponsible stands. His second video at least finally had details about the repair process, which should have been researched before he took the first video live.

    Oh, and for the record? We didn't say Linus lied. We said the repair shop was wrong about the "no iMac Pro training or parts" bit. The lie accusation was from another venue, that poor editing choices in the rebuttal video made look like was us. This makes me a little concerned that you didn't read our article before asking your questions, many of which were spelled out in the piece itself -- but I might be wrong about this part.
    edited August 8
  • Reply 268 of 279
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,339administrator
    If I've now deleted your post twice five times in 20 30 minutes, maybe you should take a gander at our commenting guidelines.

    Dissent is fine, as this thread shows. How you are expressing it is not.
    edited August 17
  • Reply 269 of 279
    Mike Wuerthele

    You are spewing a tonne of lies on here. Taking advantage of the fact that almost most of your readers have not watched the video.

    Linus clearly mentioned the screen, motherboard and power supply would need replacing

    He was willing to pay out of pocket

    Of course the iMac isn't a car. Don't you get the point of an analogy?

    The reason for the damage was also explained in his videos (2 of them). Maybe you should spend 30 mins actually paying attention to the video instead of 30 hours spreading lies.

    Also Luis rossman, a man whose career is repairing Apple products also decries Apple's policies. Apple should not be the one to decide if repairing it is "worth it". They should quote the price and the decision should be the consumer's.

    Looking at how generic your commenting guidelines are, I expect you will be deleting my post without a reply. But this had to be said. 


    edited August 26
  • Reply 270 of 279
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,339administrator
    Kartik: your comment is fine, dissent is allowed. We have behavioral rules here, which are clear, and you broke none of them.

    Mentioning the screen, motherboard and power supply would need replacing: I'm aware. Linus wasn't trying to pull a fast one, and I said so. He's welcome to seek service, but given the nature of the damage, Apple has no obligation to repair it, at any cost.

    Paid out of pocket: It doesn't matter. Any company can refuse to service a computer, airplane, car, blender, or toaster if the machine was mangled by the user -- and this one very clearly was.

    I like Rossman's videos, and Linus generally does good work. Rossman and Linus can say whatever they want regarding Apple's policies, but other than voting with their wallet, they literally don't get a say. The pair can want whatever they like -- but it makes zero difference. Rossman's business can exist because of policies like this, by the way.

    I get the point of an analogy -- even bad ones. Linus' was a very bad analogy, and inappropriate.

    And, I watched all of three of the videos in which he addresses the iMac, several times. You should have 10 minutes to read this article for comprehension before you spent 10 minutes commenting, instead of just going off what Linus or the LTT website summarized about it.

    The bottom line is this, and continues to be this. Linus made the first video with no concept of how Apple service works behind the scenes. He assumed that what one third-party told him was the absolute gospel across the whole of service providers, and it wasn't even close. He didn't bother to ask anybody how Apple service works, didn't bother reading Apple's terms of service, and didn't bother to delve into it before he made a video horrified about the whole situation. He could have done this easily by calling Rossman for 5 minutes before the first video was published.

    He corrected the record, mostly, about three months later. This is about two and a half months after it should have happened.
    edited August 26 Soli
  • Reply 271 of 279
    I don't know about all those apple fan boys out there but before you blame those "youtubers who are only in it for the revenue" you should take a damn good look at the video in question first in the link below.



    There's also a follow up video to it which I will also link below.



    You people should GET A F*CKING GOOD LOOK at those before blindly siding with apple.

    OH and SURPRISE SURPRISE THEY ENDED UP FIXING IT THEMSELVES
  • Reply 272 of 279
    Kartik: your comment is fine, dissent is allowed. We have behavioral rules here, which are clear, and you broke none of them.

    Mentioning the screen, motherboard and power supply would need replacing: I'm aware. Linus wasn't trying to pull a fast one, and I said so. He's welcome to seek service, but given the nature of the damage, Apple has no obligation to repair it, at any cost.

    Paid out of pocket: It doesn't matter. Any company can refuse to service a computer, airplane, car, blender, or toaster if the machine was mangled by the user -- and this one very clearly was.

    I like Rossman's videos, and Linus generally does good work. Rossman and Linus can say whatever they want regarding Apple's policies, but other than voting with their wallet, they literally don't get a say. The pair can want whatever they like -- but it makes zero difference. Rossman's business can exist because of policies like this, by the way.

    I get the point of an analogy -- even bad ones. Linus' was a very bad analogy, and inappropriate.

    And, I watched all of three of the videos in which he addresses the iMac, several times. You should have 10 minutes to read this article for comprehension before you spent 10 minutes commenting, instead of just going off what Linus or the LTT website summarized about it.

    The bottom line is this, and continues to be this. Linus made the first video with no concept of how Apple service works behind the scenes. He assumed that what one third-party told him was the absolute gospel across the whole of service providers, and it wasn't even close. He didn't bother to ask anybody how Apple service works, didn't bother reading Apple's terms of service, and didn't bother to delve into it before he made a video horrified about the whole situation. He could have done this easily by calling Rossman for 5 minutes before the first video was published.

    He corrected the record, mostly, about three months later. This is about two and a half months after it should have happened.
    "Rossman's business can exist because of policies like this" wow you are so full of yourselves
  • Reply 273 of 279
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,339administrator

    OH and SURPRISE SURPRISE THEY ENDED UP FIXING IT THEMSELVES
    I guess Apple didn’t stop them from fixing it after all then. Imagine that.
  • Reply 274 of 279
    Alecdyer63Alecdyer63 Posts: 1unconfirmed, member
    Ill-informed blogger seems to think he knows more than 2 well experienced technicians. You are cherry picking data to support apple blindly. You disgust me by how you treat others in your field. You clearly do not know what you are talking about.
  • Reply 275 of 279
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,339administrator
    Ill-informed blogger seems to think he knows more than 2 well experienced technicians. You are cherry picking data to support apple blindly. You disgust me by how you treat others in your field. You clearly do not know what you are talking about.
    Yeah, try again. I was on that side of the bench for a very long time, and am fully aware of what component-level repair takes as I did it for many years. Linus wasn't even born when I got started with it.

    And, frankly, I don't care if you're disgusted or not, especially since I don't think you even read the article. Let me summarize it for you: had Linus decided to take five minutes before the first video and call Rossmann, this would be a different conversation. But, he didn't and blew a lot of basic facts.


    edited October 13
  • Reply 276 of 279
    KiastaKiasta Posts: 2unconfirmed, member

    DCRM said:
    strells said:
    No link to the video in question?
    We needed to acknowledge due to how popular the video has become, we do not, however, need to drive traffic.
    Well that's a bizarre double-standard you've just implemented. After all, you're driving traffic to yourself over it, but not even acknowledging the source or linking to it? C'mon, that's not how a real media site operates - especially since you acknowledge it's popular.

    I'll be honest, I really enjoy your posts the vast majority of the time, it's great stuff, but this feels like it was written by an Apple employee. Lots of statements in here without any actual backing. Perhaps no more backing than Linus Tech Tips, but at least they provided e-mails.  For example you've made warranty claim numbers above - from where though?  Like it or not, you're a media site, not just a generic forum.  You need to at least specify if that source is Apple, a repair shop, or just your finger in the wind.

    But ultimately - none of it matters. It doesn't matter if they did the video purely for show: Apple should be able to give them a price to repair.  End of story.  The entire justification you tried to piece together doesn't hold water. It's a typical corporate sidestepping of the issue: A consumer just wants it fixed. It doesn't matter if it's a popular YouTuber or not.

    (Side note: Long time reader, first time poster. Happy to support you guys via BH Photo links and all.)
    I've worked in multiple repair shops. I know how the procedure works and verified it over the course of the day -- which is why we didn't publish this last night.

    The repair price estimated was the same at the three shops we called and have worked with in the past for many pieces -- none of which wanted to be named. Thus, the "AppleInsider has been told" part.

    I appreciate your point of view, and your readership. I've been on both sides of this counter. But, if a consumer brought me a box of parts and ask for a repair, I'd have told him to forget it back in the days of the Mac SE, the iMac DV, and in the tail-end of the 5,1 Mac Pro days.

    The customer is not always right.
    The fact that it costs so much to replace parts is an issue. There should be no reason at all repairs and parts should cost more than the machine. This is of course due to Apple's vehement attitude against right-to-repair. They absolutely are against anyone fixing their own Apple products. This is why I am no longer going to buy Apple product. The fact that you are even siding against Apple here speaks volumes. A person should have every right to repair an item they OWN. Apple does not own their products after being purchased and we consumers need to make sure of this. I can't believe I ever got wrapped up into this Apple ecosystem. I don't care that Apple refuses to repair the monitor, that's not really even the point of the video. But they REFUSE to sell replacement parts for the sole purpose of keeping the costs of their products and Authorized repairs so high. They actively fight against the right-to-repair and most Apple consumers are completely oblivious as are you apparently. I'm guessing the repair shops you worked at were Authorized Apple repair shops. Of course they are all going to be the same price because Apple dictates the prices of all their equipment the same for every one and makes it incredibly expensive because who else do they have to compete with? What incentive do they have to offer cheap replacement parts when they can force their customers to buy new hardware. They legally bully repair shops and claim any replacement parts are "counterfeit". It seems that the Author of this article is in fact the one that is "Ill-Informed".

    Edit: Also the reason the shops refused to be named is because they don't want their Authorized Apple status to be revoked. The way you phrased that suggests they supply you with parts, which they will assuredly get revoked.

    Sources:
    https://yro.slashdot.org/story/17/04/06/1829213/apple-taken-to-court-for-refusing-to-fix-devices
    https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20110531/04034914487/apple-sues-teen-who-sold-repair-parts-to-make-your-iphone-into-mythical-white-iphone.shtml
    https://ifixit.org/blog/9917/11-3-update-breaking-iphone-screens/
    https://9to5mac.com/2017/02/15/apple-nebraska-right-to-repair/
    https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/a3yadk/apple-sued-an-independent-iphone-repair-shop-owner-and-lost
    EDIT: https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/ypkqxw/do-you-know-anything-about-apples-authorized-service-provider-program (forgot to include this source)

    Source to Video in question:

    edited October 18
  • Reply 277 of 279
    KiastaKiasta Posts: 2unconfirmed, member
    sunman42 said:
    I see a cracked screen...

    How is it possible all the parts listed are actually damaged?

    Did it get hit by lightning?  It sounds like Apple didn’t have the parts or experience to make the repairs.

    Is the damage Apple’s fault?  Obviously not.  But the Apple Store should be able to send it somewhere to get fixed, and not for $5000+.

    This story is embarrassing for Apple...
    Oh, puh-lease. They only people who should be embarrassed are the yutzes who didn't know how to take proper care in reassembling the machine, and went ahead and tried anyway. The recent court ruling voiding "Don't you dare remove this label or your warranty will be voided" labels did not cover bozos breaking their own hardware.
    What exactly is your argument here? Did you even bother watching the video? They weren't even trying to get a warranty repair, they were trying to give Apply money to fix it and Apple refused. They already knew they were going to have to pay. The fact that Apple refused to even repair it and there's literally no other option other than buy a new one is the issue here.
  • Reply 278 of 279
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,339administrator
    Kiasta said:

    DCRM said:
    strells said:
    No link to the video in question?
    We needed to acknowledge due to how popular the video has become, we do not, however, need to drive traffic.
    Well that's a bizarre double-standard you've just implemented. After all, you're driving traffic to yourself over it, but not even acknowledging the source or linking to it? C'mon, that's not how a real media site operates - especially since you acknowledge it's popular.

    I'll be honest, I really enjoy your posts the vast majority of the time, it's great stuff, but this feels like it was written by an Apple employee. Lots of statements in here without any actual backing. Perhaps no more backing than Linus Tech Tips, but at least they provided e-mails.  For example you've made warranty claim numbers above - from where though?  Like it or not, you're a media site, not just a generic forum.  You need to at least specify if that source is Apple, a repair shop, or just your finger in the wind.

    But ultimately - none of it matters. It doesn't matter if they did the video purely for show: Apple should be able to give them a price to repair.  End of story.  The entire justification you tried to piece together doesn't hold water. It's a typical corporate sidestepping of the issue: A consumer just wants it fixed. It doesn't matter if it's a popular YouTuber or not.

    (Side note: Long time reader, first time poster. Happy to support you guys via BH Photo links and all.)
    I've worked in multiple repair shops. I know how the procedure works and verified it over the course of the day -- which is why we didn't publish this last night.

    The repair price estimated was the same at the three shops we called and have worked with in the past for many pieces -- none of which wanted to be named. Thus, the "AppleInsider has been told" part.

    I appreciate your point of view, and your readership. I've been on both sides of this counter. But, if a consumer brought me a box of parts and ask for a repair, I'd have told him to forget it back in the days of the Mac SE, the iMac DV, and in the tail-end of the 5,1 Mac Pro days.

    The customer is not always right.
    The fact that it costs so much to replace parts is an issue. There should be no reason at all repairs and parts should cost more than the machine. This is of course due to Apple's vehement attitude against right-to-repair. They absolutely are against anyone fixing their own Apple products. This is why I am no longer going to buy Apple product. The fact that you are even siding against Apple here speaks volumes. A person should have every right to repair an item they OWN. Apple does not own their products after being purchased and we consumers need to make sure of this. I can't believe I ever got wrapped up into this Apple ecosystem. I don't care that Apple refuses to repair the monitor, that's not really even the point of the video. But they REFUSE to sell replacement parts for the sole purpose of keeping the costs of their products and Authorized repairs so high. They actively fight against the right-to-repair and most Apple consumers are completely oblivious as are you apparently. I'm guessing the repair shops you worked at were Authorized Apple repair shops. Of course they are all going to be the same price because Apple dictates the prices of all their equipment the same for every one and makes it incredibly expensive because who else do they have to compete with? What incentive do they have to offer cheap replacement parts when they can force their customers to buy new hardware. They legally bully repair shops and claim any replacement parts are "counterfeit". It seems that the Author of this article is in fact the one that is "Ill-Informed".

    Edit: Also the reason the shops refused to be named is because they don't want their Authorized Apple status to be revoked. The way you phrased that suggests they supply you with parts, which they will assuredly get revoked.

    Sources:
    https://yro.slashdot.org/story/17/04/06/1829213/apple-taken-to-court-for-refusing-to-fix-devices
    https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20110531/04034914487/apple-sues-teen-who-sold-repair-parts-to-make-your-iphone-into-mythical-white-iphone.shtml
    https://ifixit.org/blog/9917/11-3-update-breaking-iphone-screens/
    https://9to5mac.com/2017/02/15/apple-nebraska-right-to-repair/
    https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/a3yadk/apple-sued-an-independent-iphone-repair-shop-owner-and-lost
    EDIT: https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/ypkqxw/do-you-know-anything-about-apples-authorized-service-provider-program (forgot to include this source)

    Source to Video in question:

    There's a lot here that I've covered over, and over, and over, so I'm not going to do it again. What I will say is this -- the shops that I talk to have never sold me parts. Most of the shops I have personally worked at were Apple authorized, but not all of them.


    edited October 18
  • Reply 279 of 279
    pmhpmh Posts: 3member
    You have displayed some amazing patience dealing with these ill informed trolls, Mike.
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