How to set up your home network for many Apple TVs, Macs, iPhones, and iPads

Posted:
in General Discussion edited 1:14PM
Maybe you can get away with a single Wi-Fi basestation, if you have modest needs, but with the arrival of 4K media streaming, home network bandwidth demands are growing quickly. AppleInsider shares a few tips on how to build out your network, and points out some problems to avoid along the way.

Apple's AirPort lineup


At AppleInsider we get asked a lot about basic networking and router setup and location, with a sudden flare-up after Apple announced that the AirPort lineup was dead and gone. While there are entire fields of study and engineering devoted to networking, there's no need to hit the books to set up a network for less than 10 people.

There are some best practices and things to consider instead of just slapping another Wi-Fi router on a network, or extending the network another 20 feet with a cable and a switch. So, let's cover some basics if you're thinking about going beyond a single router covering your home or small office.

This article is just an overview for beginners looking beyond just plunking down a single wi-fi router, so if you're an old hand at it, feel free to share your wisdom (but not what you're selling) in the comments section. We're also not really talking about best hardware in this article for your build, as that can vary dramatically from situation to situation.

Because of the AirPort's discontinuation, AppleInsider will continue to look at third-party options for the gear.

Plan it out!

Even if you've had a network for a while, periodically, take a step back and make sure that it can do what you need it to do, and do it well.

As buildings are put up around you and they get populated with their own gear, you may develop wi-fi dead spots. Also, as your family shifts rooms, you may have a concentration of gear where there wasn't one before causing connectivity problems.

So, even if you've got a good setup, it could still get better. And, if you're starting from a single router and expanding, a prior plan of what you need is essential before you go shopping.

Wireless only?

If it's just you, plus maybe one or two other people in a small space, then one good 802.11ac Wi-Fi router is probably all you need.

Most home networking gear's signals propagates in a torus, and is attenuated by dense building materials like brick, or a steel support beam. So, if you're using one Wi-Fi router, set it up as centrally in the house as possible.

If the family has a common gathering area, this is an obvious place to put your router. But, the practicality of this may depend on what the ISP has arranged for you for a home penetration.

Sample NetSpot Wi-Fi map of a small house


While placement is important in relation to the user, the wireless signal could also be improved by manually selecting the right channel -- even if your routers claim to do it automatically. There are a few Wi-Fi survey apps for iOS and the Mac available on the app stores. Deciding which is right for you is left as an exercise for the reader.

Multiple base stations

If, like in most homes, your primary internet drop is in the basement somewhere or along one wall of the house, then two or more basestations on opposite ends of the house or office might not be a bad idea.

A possibility on your AirPorts and on third-party routers is extending range with the Wireless Distribution System (WDS) protocol. We've never been fans, because you're sharing wi-fi bandwidth between the routers or extenders. It can also be fussy across different manufacturers.

If you're having problems with wireless reception in a nook or cranny of your house, either use Mesh networking hardware with discrete radios for communication between basestations, or an Ethernet backhaul instead.

Mesh networks

In the last few years, mesh networking hardware has debuted. The most recent batch are designed to be plunked down in disparate areas of your house, with one connected to your cable modem or router provided by your ISP and the rest of the mesh routers connecting to that one.

Skip the first generations of mesh networking hardware. They generally weren't any better than WDS connections between older routers, and had a price premium to boot. This was all rectified as the technology matured, and nearly all of the new gear has a dedicated Wi-Fi radio just for communicating between base stations.

Individual setup depends on the manufacturer, but they are generally app-configured from an iPhone or iPad, and negotiate connections between base stations automatically.

AppleInsider has examined the Google Wifi, Linksys Velop dual-band, and higher-end three-band systems and have found them easy to set up, with little maintenance or tweaking required. At present, mesh networking technologies are not cross-compatible, but the EasyMesh standard might smooth that out in the not too distant future.

Ethernet backhaul

In multiple-device environments, even the newest, speediest Wi-Fi networks can get bogged down. While Wi-Fi devices claim "up to" speeds, in reality, they are almost never met and dependent on many factors for actual speed -- including congestion.

The highest traffic devices can be taken out of this equation with an Ethernet network. A number of modern homes are being built with them in place. But, if you've got an older home, or rent, running cables through walls can be problematic.

Running Ethernet is easy, before the drywall goes on.
Running Ethernet is easy, before the drywall goes on.


When running Ethernet cabling, pick Cat 6 cabling for future-proofing, and use higher quality cable. Instead of snaking cables through existing walls, consider "up and over" by running a cable from a utility room in the basement up to the attic, and down into closets of a bedroom, behind a kitchen cabinet, or something similar. If you have a basement with an open ceiling, between joists is a nice option too.

But, while convenient, the whole house doesn't need to be wired in a hybrid wired/wireless network.

Properly done, the real-world speeds on Ethernet are second to none. It will allow you to isolate an Apple TV 4K to wired, freeing up the wireless network for less bandwidth-profound impacts.

Powerline networking

Powerline networking uses the existing electrical wiring in your house to carry a "wired" signal elsewhere in the home. They have come a long way since they were originally released, but there are still caveats.

As a general rule, you can only use two of them, connecting point-to-point. It is possible to connect more that two Powerline networking devices given the right manufacturer and hardware selection, but as it cuts into the already reduced bandwidth compared to Ethernet, it is probably better to stick to just two.

Netgear Gigabit Ethernet Powerline


What you can do is connect a Powerline spur of your network from your router to a switch on the other end of the house, say, behind a television or similar. Then, everything connected to that television, be it an Apple TV, second Wi-Fi base station, game console, or what have you, can be on a wired connection back to the main router.

Or, if there's a particularly difficult run, use Powerline to hurdle two close walls without drilling a hole.

If you need to use PowerLine as a backbone so you don't have to run a cable through your attic or basement, don't cheap out. Get the fastest one you can afford, because if you're using it as a major conduit from one location to another, you want the fattest pipe possible.

The speed and quality of the signal varies greatly depending on the house's wiring and a few other factors. For example, if the adapters are plugged into completely separate electrical circuits in a home and having to go through the house's breaker box instead of on the same run, you'll see cut-back speeds. How much depends on how bad the connection is.

The technology can also be prone to electrical interference in a variety of ways, including poor quality wiring for the sockets and in some cases the turning on or off of large appliances, such as refrigerators and microwave ovens.

MOCA networking

If you own your home, a MOCA network is a possibility. This will use the coaxial cabling for existing cable TV service in your house as pre-run network cabling, similar to Powerline plugs. And yes, unless you have AT&T's cable, and never had any other, you're good to go, even with an existing service.

But, we've never had great success with this. The speed and quality of the connection depends a great deal on situations beyond most homeowner's control. Something as simple as a low-quality coaxial cable splitter in a wall somewhere, or old cabling can completely torpedo the whole affair.

Traffic isolation

The best home network can still crumple under load, but this can be mitigated somewhat. While the vast majority of the traffic comes from the router, the destinations can be a chokepoint, causing problems downstream.

When you're building out an Ethernet network, it shouldn't be a line of cabling and switches. A hub and spoke design is far better than a line.

  • Good - Hub and Spoke
  • Bad - in-line network topography


Also, if you have a network attached storage (NAS) device on the network, consider where it should go. It's not always best to have it next to the router, even though that's a central location. If its being used for media streaming, it may better serve the intended audience closer on the network to the main streaming device.

The future

As video shifts to higher and higher resolutions, and to a streaming audience, more strain will be put not just upon the streaming companies, but on ISPs and home networks as well.

A single 4K HDR video can require about 8 megabytes per second to stream without buffering, and in our own testing we've seen peak traffic at 12 megabytes per second. Stack multiple streams up at once on the same LAN, and it can quickly bring an network to its knees.

It would be a shame if your network couldn't handle it.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 33
    MacProMacPro Posts: 17,272member
    One tip I picked up a while back is to always name 2.4 and 5 GHz networks identically with same pass word.  That way modern devices from Apple seamlessly select either that is best suited and can flip between them should the need arise. the 2.4GHz signals may sound less impressive but they travel further and through more walls.  Correct me if this is a dumb idea but it works very well on my LAN.
    edited June 12 kirkgraywatto_cobraAlex1N
  • Reply 2 of 33
    jbdragonjbdragon Posts: 1,717member
    One of the first things I did besides throwing up a large Antenna as a cable cutter was to wire my house with Cat6. I ran the cable under my house as my attic was just not practical. I ran power to my Closet that is in the middle of my house, but to get power there, I had to cut out the ceiling, fish a power cable to that location because as I said, attic wasn't practical. I have a low slope roof. Can only move around part way in the middle. It's very claustrophobic. Once got the wire there, I patched it back up as you can do that easy enough with drywall.

    So all my Network stuff I have in that closet. I have a 24 port switch. I have run Cat6 from there into all my rooms. Some have 2 cables running into the room, some have 4, or more. All going to keystones in the rooms where you can plug right in.

    I always say, things that don't move, PLUG-IN, things that move around on Wifi. So Xbox or AppleTV, etc that sit there are Plugged in. iPhone, iPad, on Wifi. I have a single ASUS router in that closet that handles my whole house, along with my Cable Modem and NAS and other things. Your Wifi Router normally has a Ethernet Switch built into it. It may have 1 port or 4 ports. You can get simple Unmanaged switches for cheap. 7 ports or like me 24 ports, though I have since gotten a Managed Switch. For most home users, you don't need or want a managed switch. Get a switch, and all you have to do is run a Ethernet cable from your router switch into your new Unmanaged Switch. That's it, and you now have more ports depending on how large of a switch you get. You can run a single Ethernet cable into a room and then Plug a small 5 port Ethernet switch in that room and then plug all your devices into that and have a small Siwtch in all your rooms instead of a single Large switch. It's pretty simple.

    There are a number of tricks you can do to wire your house. If you rent, generally you're out of luck. There are some ways to wire up and be hidden without making holes everywhere. Ethernet is just going to be faster and more reliable. Wired is just better that wireless. These days are you get more and more devices that work only on wifi because of Home control, like myself with a growing Homekit house, getting as much OFF of Wifi that you can is even more important.

    If you own your own place and can get under under your house or in the attic. Running Ethernet wire is not that hard. Cutting a hole in the wall for a low voltage box, and connecting to keystones to pop into a wall plate is not hard at all. Fishing wires is not hard. Cost is pretty CHEAP. I got all I needed from Monoprice.com. I was under my house for a couple days running a bunch of Ethernet, COAX cable for the Antenna, and ground wire for a couple rooms as I wanted grounded power outlets. That as just getting wires from point A to point B. That was 5 years ago and I haven't had to touch it sense. I would like to run Ethernet out to the garage and to a POE switch where I can have a few outside POE IP camera's on the outside of my garage. That's a future project.
    edited June 12 Alex1N
  • Reply 3 of 33
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 4,337member
    jbdragon said:
    One of the first things I did besides throwing up a large Antenna as a cable cutter was to wire my house with Cat6. I ran the cable under my house as my attic was just not practical. I ran power to my Closet that is in the middle of my house, but to get power there, I had to cut out the ceiling, fish a power cable to that location because as I said, attic wasn't practical. I have a low slope roof. Can only move around part way in the middle. It's very claustrophobic. Once got the wire there, I patched it back up as you can do that easy enough with drywall.

    So all my Network stuff I have in that closet. I have a 24 port switch. I have run Cat6 from there into all my rooms. Some have 2 cables running into the room, some have 4, or more. All going to keystones in the rooms where you can plug right in.

    I always say, things that don't move, PLUG-IN, things that move around on Wifi. So Xbox or AppleTV, etc that sit there are Plugged in. iPhone, iPad, on Wifi. I have a single ASUS router in that closet that handles my whole house, along with my Cable Modem and NAS and other things. Your Wifi Router normally has a Ethernet Switch built into it. It may have 1 port or 4 ports. You can get simple Unmanaged switches for cheap. 7 ports or like me 24 ports, though I have since gotten a Managed Switch. For most home users, you don't need or want a managed switch. Get a switch, and all you have to do is run a Ethernet cable from your router switch into your new Unmanaged Switch. That's it, and you now have more ports depending on how large of a switch you get. You can run a single Ethernet cable into a room and then Plug a small 5 port Ethernet switch in that room and then plug all your devices into that and have a small Siwtch in all your rooms instead of a single Large switch. It's pretty simple.

    There are a number of tricks you can do to wire your house. If you rent, generally you're out of luck. There are some ways to wire up and be hidden without making holes everywhere. Ethernet is just going to be faster and more reliable. Wired is just better that wireless. These days are you get more and more devices that work only on wifi because of Home control, like myself with a growing Homekit house, getting as much OFF of Wifi that you can is even more important.

    If you own your own place and can get under under your house or in the attic. Running Ethernet wire is not that hard. Cutting a hole in the wall for a low voltage box, and connecting to keystones to pop into a wall plate is not hard at all. Fishing wires is not hard. Cost is pretty CHEAP. I got all I needed from Monoprice.com. I was under my house for a couple days running a bunch of Ethernet, COAX cable for the Antenna, and ground wire for a couple rooms as I wanted grounded power outlets. That as just getting wires from point A to point B. That was 5 years ago and I haven't had to touch it sense. I would like to run Ethernet out to the garage and to a POE switch where I can have a few outside POE IP camera's on the outside of my garage. That's a future project.
    This is exactly what I did in my apartment. Luckily, it's the first floor of a house and I have access to the basement and there are already holes in the floors for the cableTV. So I was able to run CAT6 through all of the holes in the floor to the 2nd bedroom closet where the cable modem and router are (kinda like a server closet). I just put keystone jacks on them, labeled the wires and its awesome! The only thing I use wireless for are phones and some HomeKit Accessories that can't be wired in, but all of my computers, AppleTV, the TV itself, etc are all wired in. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 33
    I have a home with thick concrete construction throughout (that is how they are here in Germany) so the signal attenuation is extreme. I have my ISP provided router that connects to a simple Ethernet distribution block in the basement with it's four WAN ports. This distribution block then has wires that go to various floors in the house for wired connections. In my home office and in my bedroom (two different floors) I have two AirPort Extremes that then have my iMac and various other stationary devices connected via a wired connection. On the main level, I have an Airport Express that has my AppleTV connected to its WAN port. This works very well and AirPort Utility makes the set up drop-dead simple. The only change in the future might possibly be to swap the Express for the Extreme (AC) in the bedroom, but right now the majority of the wireless traffic (iPad video watching) is done on the floor with the bedrooms. The main floor has the TV with the AppleTV connected via Ethernet, and so the majority of the wireless traffic there is general surfing and messaging and such. I do have a few Homekit accessories on that floor as well, but their traffic seems to be minimal. As the kids continue to grow (and then use their own devices) this usage pattern may shift, but I don't think so. The only real shift I can forsee might be with the addition of more Homekit things as that market continues to mature and I add to my set up.
    edited June 12 racerhomie3watto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 33
    Pretty good article. But one other that should be mentioned aside from Powerline Adapters is MoCA Networking. Just about every older home, condo, apartment, town house including modern homes has coax wiring. Running Ethernet cable in older homes can really be a challenge for people that have concrete construction floors or basements for running cable through the walls and floors. What is MoCA? it stands for “Multimedia over Coax”. In short Ethernet over existing Coax lines in your house, which can handle both internet and TV signal if needed over the coax line to every room in your place. MoCA can also fix Wireless Dead Zones in your house. It's very simple to hookup too, All you have to do is purchase a MoCA adapter that goes between your Cable Modem and Wireless Router or they now have Wireless Routers that you can purchase that has MoCA built right into it. Then All you need is a MoCA adapter in each room where there is a coax jack and you will have that internet available in that room, you can even go even further by plugging one in a 5 port switch which will give you even more Ethernet ports in that room for your Entertainment setup with your HDTV and your Apple TV or other electronics you have like your Apple computers. Aside from this the one thing you will want to purchase is a PoE MoCA filter which protects your place from someone else from connecting to your MoCA network from outside your place. PoE filters also prevent the cross-interference, but MoCA signals can still interfere if a neighbor does not also have a filter. Hardwired Ethernet is the best , but for people with older homes, MoCA is almost same as wired cable. Here's a couple good How to Video's on MoCA Networking. http://www.mocainyourhouse.com/ http://www.mocainyourhouse.com/moca-videos-lontv About MoCA Network Adapters and Products https://www.actiontec.com/moca/
    edited June 12
  • Reply 6 of 33
    NaiyasNaiyas Posts: 9member
    I’m also of the view that if it doesn’t move, wired, if it does, wireless. My previous place was a 2 bed apartment that I ended up wiring with Cat 6e to offload the high bandwidth TV, Apple TV, NAS, Server, and cameras. This was much needed given the volume of WiFi networks around me at the time - 120+. Now I’ve moved to a 4 storey town house I have a new project... I’m going to go with a similar design as I’m still seeing 75+ WiFi networks from most of my rooms so offloading as much as possible to wired is a must do. Given the growth of smart home devices (and their hubs) the issue is going to be deciding the best place to locate these to get optimum coverage to the devices they serve.
  • Reply 7 of 33
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,592member
    MacPro said:
    One tip I picked up a while back is to always name 2.4 and 5 GHz networks identically with same pass word.  That way modern devices from Apple seamlessly select either that is best suited and can flip between them should the need arise. 
    I've had a slightly different but related experience. In my case I have noticed that an iPhone will try to maintain the current connection regardless of how weak it becomes even though there is another known network with the same password that is stronger. In order to use the stronger connection I have to manually select it in the wifi settings.
  • Reply 8 of 33
    maltzmaltz Posts: 90member
    MacPro said:
    One tip I picked up a while back is to always name 2.4 and 5 GHz networks identically with same pass word.  That way modern devices from Apple seamlessly select either that is best suited and can flip between them should the need arise. the 2.4GHz signals may sound less impressive but they travel further and through more walls.  Correct me if this is a dumb idea but it works very well on my LAN.
    This is ideal, imo, but not all wifi routers deal well with devices switching radios, and I've even seen routers that wouldn't even let you name both SSIDs the same.  My advice is to try to name them the same thing, but if you have problems, split them up and see if that works better.  Keeping in mind that 2.4GHz is going to be slower, but have better penetration through walls and other objects.  So if it's a device you often use at the other end of the house from the router, the 2.4GHz band may give you better results than 5GHz.
  • Reply 9 of 33
    No legitimate Category 6e standard exists, and Cat 6e is not a recognized standard by the Telecommunications Industry Association. I would recommend updating this article to reflect the recommendation for Cat 6a for which there is a recognized standard by the industry. 
  • Reply 10 of 33
    Cat 7 would probably be better to go with today in a new home.
  • Reply 11 of 33
    If your house is wired for Cable that you are no longer using, could you not re-purpose the wires to distribute your internet and avoid running Ethernet cable?
    Maybe there is a business opportunity for making an adapter to allow Ethernet over TV cable.

    In my current home setup the cable modem is right next to the eero base and the Apple TV 4K with a couple of satellites. Not seeing any issues streaming except when the issue is on the other end. I dropped DTVN because AT&T has issues streaming. Saw the same problem on wired and wireless on multiple ISPs. Not seeing that problem on YouTube TV.
  • Reply 12 of 33
    Cat 7 would probably be better to go with today in a new home.
    As far as capacity, what is the difference between Cat 6, Cat 6e and Cat 7?
  • Reply 13 of 33
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 2,663administrator
    If your house is wired for Cable that you are no longer using, could you not re-purpose the wires to distribute your internet and avoid running Ethernet cable?
    Maybe there is a business opportunity for making an adapter to allow Ethernet over TV cable.

    In my current home setup the cable modem is right next to the eero base and the Apple TV 4K with a couple of satellites. Not seeing any issues streaming except when the issue is on the other end. I dropped DTVN because AT&T has issues streaming. Saw the same problem on wired and wireless on multiple ISPs. Not seeing that problem on YouTube TV.
    Sure. MOCA adapters can be had, but they're just as prone to connection problems as Powerline adapters are -- maybe more so. Old splitters, sometimes behind walls, can be a big, big problem.

    Good suggestion. I'll add a bit about it.
    edited June 12 GG1
  • Reply 14 of 33
    MacProMacPro Posts: 17,272member
    volcan said:
    MacPro said:
    One tip I picked up a while back is to always name 2.4 and 5 GHz networks identically with same pass word.  That way modern devices from Apple seamlessly select either that is best suited and can flip between them should the need arise. 
    I've had a slightly different but related experience. In my case I have noticed that an iPhone will try to maintain the current connection regardless of how weak it becomes even though there is another known network with the same password that is stronger. In order to use the stronger connection I have to manually select it in the wifi settings.
    You say the same password but is the name identical? If so, if it were me, I'd delete them and start over in case there is a typo you are not seeing.
  • Reply 15 of 33
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,592member
    MacPro said:
    You say the same password but is the name identical? If so, if it were me, I'd delete them and start over in case there is a typo you are not seeing.
    I haven't tried it for awhile but as I recall yes the names were the same but on two different physical routers not simply two different frequencies on a single router. Currently I have different names, I.E. kitchen, backyard, upstairs, etc. and it definitely will not switch to a different router until the signal from the one it was connected to is completely out of range. I did a similar test to see when it would bail on wifi and switch to cellular. I could walk way down to the end of a long driveway and it would finally switch but walking back it clung onto cellular until I got within a couple paces of the front door.
  • Reply 16 of 33
    Cat 7 would probably be better to go with today in a new home.
    Category 7A is not recognized by the either the TIA or the EIA. Cat 6a is by default a STP, whereas Cat 7 is not. Max Bandwith between for each according to third parties is 500MHz (Cat 6A) vs 600MHz (Cat 7). Lab testing for Cat 7 shows it can theoretically support 40Gbps at a distance under 50m. I would argue that inside a home and in wall with power wiring you would always want a shielded twisted pair. 

    Cat 7 would probably be better to go with today in a new home.
    As far as capacity, what is the difference between Cat 6, Cat 6e and Cat 7?
    Capacity differences present themselves over the total length of cable in a given environment. 
    GG1
  • Reply 17 of 33
     
    "feel free to share your wisdom"
    OH WOW GUYS! Aren't you in luck. I love talking about networking and here's my favor-
    AppleInsider said:
    "(but not what you're selling)"
    But...
    aw...
    *packs up suitcase full of Velop's amazing mesh routers that you'd absolutely love to try...*
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 33
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 4,098member
    jbdragon said:
    One of the first things I did besides throwing up a large Antenna as a cable cutter was to wire my house with Cat6. I ran the cable under my house as my attic was just not practical. I ran power to my Closet that is in the middle of my house, but to get power there, I had to cut out the ceiling, fish a power cable to that location because as I said, attic wasn't practical. I have a low slope roof. Can only move around part way in the middle. It's very claustrophobic. Once got the wire there, I patched it back up as you can do that easy enough with drywall.

    So all my Network stuff I have in that closet. I have a 24 port switch. I have run Cat6 from there into all my rooms. Some have 2 cables running into the room, some have 4, or more. All going to keystones in the rooms where you can plug right in.

    I always say, things that don't move, PLUG-IN, things that move around on Wifi. So Xbox or AppleTV, etc that sit there are Plugged in. iPhone, iPad, on Wifi. I have a single ASUS router in that closet that handles my whole house, along with my Cable Modem and NAS and other things. Your Wifi Router normally has a Ethernet Switch built into it. It may have 1 port or 4 ports. You can get simple Unmanaged switches for cheap. 7 ports or like me 24 ports, though I have since gotten a Managed Switch. For most home users, you don't need or want a managed switch. Get a switch, and all you have to do is run a Ethernet cable from your router switch into your new Unmanaged Switch. That's it, and you now have more ports depending on how large of a switch you get. You can run a single Ethernet cable into a room and then Plug a small 5 port Ethernet switch in that room and then plug all your devices into that and have a small Siwtch in all your rooms instead of a single Large switch. It's pretty simple.

    There are a number of tricks you can do to wire your house. If you rent, generally you're out of luck. There are some ways to wire up and be hidden without making holes everywhere. Ethernet is just going to be faster and more reliable. Wired is just better that wireless. These days are you get more and more devices that work only on wifi because of Home control, like myself with a growing Homekit house, getting as much OFF of Wifi that you can is even more important.

    If you own your own place and can get under under your house or in the attic. Running Ethernet wire is not that hard. Cutting a hole in the wall for a low voltage box, and connecting to keystones to pop into a wall plate is not hard at all. Fishing wires is not hard. Cost is pretty CHEAP. I got all I needed from Monoprice.com. I was under my house for a couple days running a bunch of Ethernet, COAX cable for the Antenna, and ground wire for a couple rooms as I wanted grounded power outlets. That as just getting wires from point A to point B. That was 5 years ago and I haven't had to touch it sense. I would like to run Ethernet out to the garage and to a POE switch where I can have a few outside POE IP camera's on the outside of my garage. That's a future project.
    I did something similar, WiFi is only used for visitors, with a guest network, cellphones, iPad's, and laptops. Everything else in my house is hardwired CAT6 on gigabit 32 port switch, hocked to gigabit router. I did not have luxury of prewiring a new house, I did this all after the fact and put in 1000 ft of network cables. This set-up has never caused me any problems, my network just works, and Wi-Fi handles low bandwidth requirements.

    Wi-Fi will always have problems when it comes to real time data requirements like live streaming, buffering becomes an issues when you add WiFi into the mix. 
  • Reply 19 of 33

    Thanks for this article. It is really helpful. Can you also recommend some good WiFi survey apps for iOS?

    Special shout-out to Victor as well, who had sent me details on setting up a roaming network using existing AirPort Extremes. Thanks!

    watto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 33
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 2,663administrator

    Thanks for this article. It is really helpful. Can you also recommend some good WiFi survey apps for iOS?

    Special shout-out to Victor as well, who had sent me details on setting up a roaming network using existing AirPort Extremes. Thanks!

    We've got a few more articles in the pipeline about home networking, and we'll be talking about Wi-Fi surveys more in them.
    watto_cobra
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