How to set up your home network for many Apple TVs, Macs, iPhones, and iPads

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  • Reply 21 of 33
    odinsdadodinsdad Posts: 11member
    If you're looking to setup a great home network (Or even a small business network) Ubiquiti (ubnt.com) has great solutions that are extremely powerful. I have provided the Ubiquiti Unifi solution to many customers and all of them are very satisfied.
    Yes, as priced out in the cart it costs $510.97 but you will get a network that provides WiFi everywhere with incredible speeds and the controlling software will give you more metrics and control than you knew was even possible. There are apps for iOS, Android, macOS and Linux.
    If you need help setting things up there are a couple of YouTube channels that have outstanding help videos that will walk you though it. 

    Cross Talk Solutions

    Willie Howe


    Material List (With one access point):


    I hope this information helps. You can thank me later! ;-)

    ~e

    P.S. No, I do not work for Ubiquiti.
  • Reply 22 of 33
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,130administrator
    odinsdad said:
    If you're looking to setup a great home network (Or even a small business network) Ubiquiti (ubnt.com) has great solutions that are extremely powerful. I have provided the Ubiquiti Unifi solution to many customers and all of them are very satisfied.
    Yes, as priced out in the cart it costs $510.97 but you will get a network that provides WiFi everywhere with incredible speeds and the controlling software will give you more metrics and control than you knew was even possible. There are apps for iOS, Android, macOS and Linux.
    If you need help setting things up there are a couple of YouTube channels that have outstanding help videos that will walk you though it. 

    Cross Talk Solutions

    Willie Howe


    Material List (With one access point):


    I hope this information helps. You can thank me later! ;-)

    ~e

    P.S. No, I do not work for Ubiquiti.
    Ubiquiti is nice gear. It's a little beyond the scope of this article, but we'll be talking more about them in a later piece.
  • Reply 23 of 33
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 1,521member
    I have run into this recently.... moved from a house where I had a main Ethernet trunk-line between floors, with stuff like PS4, TV, and 'server' on it.... to an apartment where we can't easily run cables and are currently 100% WiFi. I thought being 'ac' with mostly 'ac' devices we'd maybe be OK, but I've already hit problems and am looking at the power-line stuff.

    And, this is my issue with the wireless future... there is the specs, and then there is reality. :)
    (I've even had some problem with my Magic Trackpad disconnecting and stuttering, which maybe is some kind of interference? I didn't have that at the old place.)
  • Reply 24 of 33
    vmarksvmarks Posts: 578editor
    MacPro said:
    volcan said:
    MacPro said:
    One tip I picked up a while back is to always name 2.4 and 5 GHz networks identically with same pass word.  That way modern devices from Apple seamlessly select either that is best suited and can flip between them should the need arise. 
    I've had a slightly different but related experience. In my case I have noticed that an iPhone will try to maintain the current connection regardless of how weak it becomes even though there is another known network with the same password that is stronger. In order to use the stronger connection I have to manually select it in the wifi settings.
    You say the same password but is the name identical? If so, if it were me, I'd delete them and start over in case there is a typo you are not seeing.
    I've had both of your experiences, with different routers. Some support using the same name and switching between the two radios, and some do not, even if they allow you to give them the same name.
    cgWerks
  • Reply 25 of 33
    vmarksvmarks Posts: 578editor
     
    "feel free to share your wisdom"
    OH WOW GUYS! Aren't you in luck. I love talking about networking and here's my favor-
    AppleInsider said:
    "(but not what you're selling)"
    But...
    aw...
    *packs up suitcase full of Velop's amazing mesh routers that you'd absolutely love to try...*
    I reviewed Velop a while back. We liked it. 
  • Reply 26 of 33
    vmarksvmarks Posts: 578editor

    Thanks for this article. It is really helpful. Can you also recommend some good WiFi survey apps for iOS?

    Special shout-out to Victor as well, who had sent me details on setting up a roaming network using existing AirPort Extremes. Thanks!

    We've got a few more articles in the pipeline about home networking, and we'll be talking about Wi-Fi surveys more in them.
    Wifiner on the App Store.

    It's basically a pared down consumer version of NetSpot, which is ideal for performing wireless surveys. I use it in all of my reviews. 
    cgWerks
  • Reply 27 of 33
    vmarksvmarks Posts: 578editor
    If your house is wired for Cable that you are no longer using, could you not re-purpose the wires to distribute your internet and avoid running Ethernet cable?
    Maybe there is a business opportunity for making an adapter to allow Ethernet over TV cable.

    In my current home setup the cable modem is right next to the eero base and the Apple TV 4K with a couple of satellites. Not seeing any issues streaming except when the issue is on the other end. I dropped DTVN because AT&T has issues streaming. Saw the same problem on wired and wireless on multiple ISPs. Not seeing that problem on YouTube TV.
    Sure. MOCA adapters can be had, but they're just as prone to connection problems as Powerline adapters are -- maybe more so. Old splitters, sometimes behind walls, can be a big, big problem.

    Good suggestion. I'll add a bit about it.
    Powerline's biggest issue is this: in the US, our power is two phases of 120 in the fuse box, as opposed to one phase of 240 in Europe and ROW. The experience you get in the US is, if you plug one transceiver into an outlet on one phase, and the other to an outlet on the other phase, the signal can't cross between the two in the fuse box. Unless you know your fusebox really well, it's a recipe for frustration. Powerline works great in Europe and Rest of World. For North America, it's kind of a non-starter.

    MOCA, Mike named the problem: a splitter takes a signal that is -2db and drops it to two legs of -5 or -7.5 db. Or three legs, with two different measurements of signal drop. And in US homes with multiple rooms, there are multiple daisy chained splitters, each dropping the signal even more. The internet signal really needs the purest run with the least signal drop, which is why cable modems tend to have one line from the street, one 2-leg splitter, one leg for the whole house, and one direct to the modem. If you're trying to use MOCA for runs that would ideally be Ethernet, you will have difficulties if there's a splitter (or two, or three) in the middle.


    cgWerks
  • Reply 28 of 33
    vmarksvmarks Posts: 578editor
    odinsdad said:
    If you're looking to setup a great home network (Or even a small business network) Ubiquiti (ubnt.com) has great solutions that are extremely powerful. I have provided the Ubiquiti Unifi solution to many customers and all of them are very satisfied....

    P.S. No, I do not work for Ubiquiti.
    You don't work for them, but you do resell them?
  • Reply 29 of 33
    vmarksvmarks Posts: 578editor
    cgWerks said:
    I have run into this recently.... moved from a house where I had a main Ethernet trunk-line between floors, with stuff like PS4, TV, and 'server' on it.... to an apartment where we can't easily run cables and are currently 100% WiFi. I thought being 'ac' with mostly 'ac' devices we'd maybe be OK, but I've already hit problems and am looking at the power-line stuff.

    And, this is my issue with the wireless future... there is the specs, and then there is reality. :)
    plan on being disappointed with Powerline. Specs v reality reminds me of the mechanical engineers who made a banner reading, "it fits in CAD!"
    cgWerks
  • Reply 30 of 33
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 1,521member
    vmarks said:
    plan on being disappointed with Powerline. Specs v reality reminds me of the mechanical engineers who made a banner reading, "it fits in CAD!"
    Thanks. Or, in other words (reading your comments above), make sure I buy it from somewhere I can return it. :(
    I may have little choice in our current residence other than to try it, though... or just live with the problems until we move.

    re: CAD - for sure. That said, I used to do 3D solids-modeling CAD in the later 90s and often found problems the industrial-designers and architects wouldn't have otherwise found. But, there is also a certain 'art' to things like tolerances and real-world mechanisms. I remember a machine prototype we designed that I could just 'see' wasn't going to work from the design and was trying to tell the industrial-designer, but he wouldn't listen and we just had to build it and find out that it indeed wouldn't work (and then spend several hours modifying and rigging it to kinda-sorta work).
  • Reply 31 of 33
    Re MoCA (Multimedia over Coax Alliance, http://www.mocalliance.org), I had amazing results helping a friend wire his 5,000+ square foot multi-story house using MoCA using Actiontec MoCA 2.0 Ethernet to Coax Adapters purchased from Amazon. Almost 1 year later, the ethernet over coax network is still working reliably.

    A few facts probably helped:
    • all the house's coax wiring was "home-runned" to a single point in the house
    • a MoCA POE (point of entry) filter was used on a "just in case" basis to prevent interference
    • Very high-frequency splitters designed for use with MoCA (BAMF 2-Way Coax Cable Splitter Bi-Directional MoCA 5-2300MHz) were used to split the signal from an external TV antenna and the Ethernet-over-coax MoCA signal to other network devices in the house like switches, Apple TV, and WiFi access points
    The MoCA-enabled network was much less expensive and much higher bandwidth than any other alternative, including mesh network devices and cutting drywall to run conventional ethernet wiring.

    Here is a diagram:

    edited June 14
  • Reply 32 of 33
    vmarksvmarks Posts: 578editor
    brighter said:
    Re MoCA (Multimedia over Coax Alliance, http://www.mocalliance.org), I had amazing results helping a friend wire his 5,000+ square foot multi-story house using MoCA using Actiontec MoCA 2.0 Ethernet to Coax Adapters purchased from Amazon. Almost 1 year later, the ethernet over coax network is still working reliably.

    A few facts probably helped:
    • all the house's coax wiring was "home-runned" to a single point in the house
    • a MoCA POE (point of entry) filter was used on a "just in case" basis to prevent interference
    • Very high-frequency splitters designed for use with MoCA (BAMF 2-Way Coax Cable Splitter Bi-Directional MoCA 5-2300MHz) were used to split the signal from an external TV antenna and the Ethernet-over-coax MoCA signal to other network devices in the house like switches, Apple TV, and WiFi access points
    The MoCA-enabled network was much less expensive and much higher bandwidth than any other alternative, including mesh network devices and cutting drywall to run conventional ethernet wiring.

    Here is a diagram:

    YES.

    A 2100Mhz or 2300Mhz splitter is best, and going with as few legs as possible (2-way, not 3-way) means less dB drop. 

    Nice call using the RT2600ac, too - that's a really good device. My only annoyance with it is waiting for 10 minute reboots on it.

    What is the house COAX splitter in use?
  • Reply 33 of 33
    vmarks said:
    YES.

    A 2100Mhz or 2300Mhz splitter is best, and going with as few legs as possible (2-way, not 3-way) means less dB drop. 

    Nice call using the RT2600ac, too - that's a really good device. My only annoyance with it is waiting for 10 minute reboots on it.

    What is the house COAX splitter in use?
    The house Coax splitter was already there, a model used by Time Warner Cable (now Spectrum) that also included an amplifier. Since the house splitter/amplifier was already there, and one goal was to save costs, we saw no reason to buy another. The splitter supported all the frequencies needed for MoCA and Over-the-Air (OTA) broadcast TV signal.

    MoCA worked and has continued to work perfectly.

    Since the install the only usability/reliability difficulty was the ATSC tuner needed to compensate for the lack of a tuner in my friend's Vizio TV.
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