Apple repair policy critic vows to fight 'counterfeit' battery seizure by U.S. customs

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Comments

  • Reply 61 of 72
    Well, if they're truly counterfeit/dishonestly labeled, then I'm wrong ... but if they've been pulled from other Apple laptops, then he has a case, IMO.
    "Usually I ask them to sharpie out the Apple logo, and usually they do. Problem solved. Why that did not happen here is beyond me" 

     In his video he specifically gives a 'what if' statement, that 'these batteries could be salvaged parts not counterfeit', he avoids saying they are or proving they weren't.



    edited October 2018
  • Reply 62 of 72
    AcinonyxAcinonyx Posts: 2unconfirmed, member
    You should read this thread, he admits to using counterfeit batteries and parts https://www.reddit.com/r/apple/comments/9pow06/louis_rossmann_admits_to_using_parts_from_a/
  • Reply 63 of 72
    The only way we know we have an Apple quality product is the Apple logo on the phone. Most of us cannot see inside to know the state of repair or judge good or bad parts. 

    If if we want an after market system then we need a way to mark repaired phones. When this guy engraves phones he repairs with his own logo so we can track his work then maybe he might earn the right to do non OME repairs. Until he does he is not accountable and is just a Plausible crook like the rest of the non-approved repair industry. 
    edited October 2018
  • Reply 64 of 72
    The only way we know we have an Apple quality product is the Apple logo on the phone. Most of us cannot see inside to know the state of repair or judge good or bad parts. 

    If if we want an after market system then we need a way to mark repaired phones. When this guy engraves phones he repairs with his own logo so we can track his work then maybe he might earn the right to do non OME repairs. Until he does he is not accountable and is just a Plausible crook like the rest of the non-approved repair industry. 
    No, the only way we know we have an Apple quality product is to buy new from Apple or other authorized distributor (or refurbs direct from Apple). 

    Like buying a used car, you should assume that any used (or refurbed by a third party) product you buy could very well have non-Apple, aftermarket parts and may give you no end of trouble. That’s part of the gamble you take when buying used. Could be a lightly used, completely genuine Apple product—or someone dumping their nightmare POS. Caveat emptor. There is no accountability with third party repairs, and there never will be. 
    edited October 2018
  • Reply 65 of 72
    One of the reasons I have yet to buy a Mac is due to the crazy repair policies Apple has. They basically provide you two choices, pay for our expensive repair package (Applecare) and get 3 years of coverage, after that, good luck, or buy a new machine. I think Apple needs to understand there should be a balance between security and convenience. To go full blast on security is never the best option, just like going full blast ignoring security isn't. Find a balance Apple so everyone wins, Apple and the customer. Right now it just feels like Apple is winning.
  • Reply 66 of 72
    bitmodbitmod Posts: 267member
    Apple is going to be hammered with the class actions coming against it for unfair and deceptive repair practices. $1200 for 2 minute no cost repairs? $800 to fix dust under a key? $450 for a piece of glass. There is zero justification for these things.
  • Reply 67 of 72
    freerangefreerange Posts: 1,589member
    sflocal said:
    Those of you who haven't watched Rossmann's YouTube videos really should.  I originally had issues with his rants, but after watching a lot of his repair videos, I really have quite a bit of respect for the guy.  He reminds me of those old-school honest, garage repairman prodigies.  He really knows his stuff and he genuinely wants to put the customer first.  He makes a sh!tload of money (I'm guessing) in repairing machines that Apple will not service, or makes it too expensive to service.

    I've seen quite a few of his videos where a customer has a MacBook serviced BY APPLE, or the customer purchased a refurbished MacBook (FROM APPLE) and showing to the world the dismal quality of the repair.  Bad solders, grimy PCB, etc.. Rossman knows his stuff.  I'll give him that.

    On the flip side, Rossmann is a very angry person when it comes to Apple's corporate decisions.  He makes a good living pandering to the Applehaters and YouTube trolls, but I'll give him credit where credit is due.  That news report was damning to Apple and frankly, Apple deserved it.  It was beyond an embarrassment how Apple's genius people essentially lied to the customer, only to have Rossman fully document on video the problem and was fixed (for free) in minutes, or give an option to properly repair the problem for $75-$150.  That's old-school pride.

    I see both sides.  I understand Apple's position with 3rd-party repairs, but I also see point that Rossmann makes.  The reality is that people that have their Apple products serviced by 3rd party people - only to have them break again - will simply blame Apple in the end, which is why I know why Apple does what they do.  However, people like Rossmann should have the ability and tools necessary to repair Mac products.  

    The reality is that it's hard to find people with Rossmann's technical abilities that will work for shops like Apple.  They most likely would not be able to afford him, or people like him.  It's sad but true.  
    Actually, if he’s so good, and I have no reason to doubt that he is, why doesn’t he simply become an Apple authorized service center? I used an unauthorized Apple repair shop in the past and was totally ripped off. It would seem that he would be even more successful if he got certified instead of bitching about policies meant to protect consumers. 
    edited October 2018
  • Reply 68 of 72
    bigmikebigmike Posts: 253member
    Apple just wants total control over their ecosystem. This guy is just a repair guy that doesn't overcharge to fix computers. Why would Apple give two craps about a little Joe Shmoe like this? Because they want all the money and control but don't want people to realize that they jack up repair costs through the roof. Like the guy said – it's about principle. Same reason why they solder their chips into place and glue the batteries (not even necessary) in place – to keep people from working on their own computer themselves, and to keep people buying new ones because they can't update older computers at all now. I really like Apple products and I have been an Apple customer since the Apple IIe came out. But they need to get back to customization – let the user configure and update their own computer as they see fit. I heard the new Mac Pro will be more physically configurable / swappable. This is a great idea but should also be applied to MacBooks. At least for MB Pros. Come on, Apple...
  • Reply 69 of 72
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,754administrator
    freerange said:
    sflocal said:
    Those of you who haven't watched Rossmann's YouTube videos really should.  I originally had issues with his rants, but after watching a lot of his repair videos, I really have quite a bit of respect for the guy.  He reminds me of those old-school honest, garage repairman prodigies.  He really knows his stuff and he genuinely wants to put the customer first.  He makes a sh!tload of money (I'm guessing) in repairing machines that Apple will not service, or makes it too expensive to service.

    I've seen quite a few of his videos where a customer has a MacBook serviced BY APPLE, or the customer purchased a refurbished MacBook (FROM APPLE) and showing to the world the dismal quality of the repair.  Bad solders, grimy PCB, etc.. Rossman knows his stuff.  I'll give him that.

    On the flip side, Rossmann is a very angry person when it comes to Apple's corporate decisions.  He makes a good living pandering to the Applehaters and YouTube trolls, but I'll give him credit where credit is due.  That news report was damning to Apple and frankly, Apple deserved it.  It was beyond an embarrassment how Apple's genius people essentially lied to the customer, only to have Rossman fully document on video the problem and was fixed (for free) in minutes, or give an option to properly repair the problem for $75-$150.  That's old-school pride.

    I see both sides.  I understand Apple's position with 3rd-party repairs, but I also see point that Rossmann makes.  The reality is that people that have their Apple products serviced by 3rd party people - only to have them break again - will simply blame Apple in the end, which is why I know why Apple does what they do.  However, people like Rossmann should have the ability and tools necessary to repair Mac products.  

    The reality is that it's hard to find people with Rossmann's technical abilities that will work for shops like Apple.  They most likely would not be able to afford him, or people like him.  It's sad but true.  
    Actually, if he’s so good, and I have no reason to doubt that he is, why doesn’t he simply become an Apple authorized service center? I used an unauthorized Apple repair shop in the past and was totally ripped off. It would seem that he would be even more successful if he got certified instead of bitching about policies meant to protect consumers. 
    AASP's aren't allowed to do component-level repair.
  • Reply 70 of 72
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,754administrator

    bigmike said:
    Apple just wants total control over their ecosystem. This guy is just a repair guy that doesn't overcharge to fix computers. Why would Apple give two craps about a little Joe Shmoe like this? Because they want all the money and control but don't want people to realize that they jack up repair costs through the roof. Like the guy said – it's about principle. Same reason why they solder their chips into place and glue the batteries (not even necessary) in place – to keep people from working on their own computer themselves, and to keep people buying new ones because they can't update older computers at all now. I really like Apple products and I have been an Apple customer since the Apple IIe came out. But they need to get back to customization – let the user configure and update their own computer as they see fit. I heard the new Mac Pro will be more physically configurable / swappable. This is a great idea but should also be applied to MacBooks. At least for MB Pros. Come on, Apple...
    If this is a reason, it isn't the major one. Reliability data that we've been collecting from both before and after the iPhone (and briefly talked about in a related article) has shown a marked drop in failure rates the more glued down and single-component that the products get. While the absolute number has gone up because of the dramatic inflow of iOS users, the percent of failed units has dropped by half across the board.
    edited October 2018
  • Reply 71 of 72
    majorslmajorsl Posts: 119unconfirmed, member
    freerange said:
    sflocal said:
    Those of you who haven't watched Rossmann's YouTube videos really should.  I originally had issues with his rants, but after watching a lot of his repair videos, I really have quite a bit of respect for the guy.  He reminds me of those old-school honest, garage repairman prodigies.  He really knows his stuff and he genuinely wants to put the customer first.  He makes a sh!tload of money (I'm guessing) in repairing machines that Apple will not service, or makes it too expensive to service.

    I've seen quite a few of his videos where a customer has a MacBook serviced BY APPLE, or the customer purchased a refurbished MacBook (FROM APPLE) and showing to the world the dismal quality of the repair.  Bad solders, grimy PCB, etc.. Rossman knows his stuff.  I'll give him that.

    On the flip side, Rossmann is a very angry person when it comes to Apple's corporate decisions.  He makes a good living pandering to the Applehaters and YouTube trolls, but I'll give him credit where credit is due.  That news report was damning to Apple and frankly, Apple deserved it.  It was beyond an embarrassment how Apple's genius people essentially lied to the customer, only to have Rossman fully document on video the problem and was fixed (for free) in minutes, or give an option to properly repair the problem for $75-$150.  That's old-school pride.

    I see both sides.  I understand Apple's position with 3rd-party repairs, but I also see point that Rossmann makes.  The reality is that people that have their Apple products serviced by 3rd party people - only to have them break again - will simply blame Apple in the end, which is why I know why Apple does what they do.  However, people like Rossmann should have the ability and tools necessary to repair Mac products.  

    The reality is that it's hard to find people with Rossmann's technical abilities that will work for shops like Apple.  They most likely would not be able to afford him, or people like him.  It's sad but true.  
    Actually, if he’s so good, and I have no reason to doubt that he is, why doesn’t he simply become an Apple authorized service center? I used an unauthorized Apple repair shop in the past and was totally ripped off. It would seem that he would be even more successful if he got certified instead of bitching about policies meant to protect consumers. 
    Because he'd no longer be able to do most everything he does now because of Apple's AASP policies.  He'd be "reduced" to module swaps and at the whim of Apple's service policies.  I left an AASP for greener pastures years ago when things were started to get bad, and you'd have to be certifiably nuts to get in that game nowadays.  Rossman has something somewhere where he has anonymous feedback from AASP techs of the policies/rules, and how they can be sued by Apple for violating anything with little or no recourse, INCLUDING talking about them.  Crazy stuff, and I believe it having seen the start of it.
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