Hands on: Apple's iPhone XR brings color and value to the 2018 lineup

13567

Comments

  • Reply 41 of 125
    It’s hilarious that the word value was used in the headline. 
    $750 (flagship prices not very long ago) ... now mid range phone prices this year is NOT value. 

    Apple has just reset expectations with its ultra expensive X, XS and XS Max.

    Its a decent enough phone In many ways with a mid tier screen option (resolution wise). But value for money .. only if you are rich! 

    canukstormavon b7irelandwilliamlondon
  • Reply 42 of 125
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 6,869administrator
    lewchenko said:
    It’s hilarious that the word value was used in the headline. 
    $750 (flagship prices not very long ago) ... now mid range phone prices this year is NOT value. 

    Apple has just reset expectations with its ultra expensive X, XS and XS Max.

    Its a decent enough phone In many ways with a mid tier screen option (resolution wise). But value for money .. only if you are rich! 

    More laughable is not comparing the total cost of ownership to alternatives. This iPhone XR (or the X, XS, and Max) will dramatically outlive most, if not all, of their counterparts with five full years of OS and security support. 

    Yeah, it's a big whack. But to say that all of a sudden Apple has these high prices and that big whack somehow has no value? That's a ludicrous statement to make.
    edited October 2018 GeorgeBMacStrangeDayswilliamlondonbb-15
  • Reply 43 of 125
    Mike,  ….what iOS version, does the new iPhone Xr arrive with, please?
  • Reply 44 of 125
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 6,869administrator
    Mike,  ….what iOS version, does the new iPhone Xr arrive with, please?
    The one we got was iOS 12.0, with an immediate update to 12.0.1 available as soon as you set up the device.
    chia
  • Reply 45 of 125
    canukstormcanukstorm Posts: 2,719member
    lewchenko said:
    It’s hilarious that the word value was used in the headline. 
    $750 (flagship prices not very long ago) ... now mid range phone prices this year is NOT value. 

    Apple has just reset expectations with its ultra expensive X, XS and XS Max.

    Its a decent enough phone In many ways with a mid tier screen option (resolution wise). But value for money .. only if you are rich! 

    More laughable is not comparing the total cost of ownership to alternatives. This iPhone XR (or the X, XS, and Max) will dramatically outlive most, if not all, of their counterparts with five full years of OS and security support. 

    Yeah, it's a big whack. But to say that all of a sudden Apple has these high prices and that big whack somehow has no value? That's a ludicrous statement to make.
    I can definitely see the XR get 4 years worth of iOS updates.  Five would be pushing it.
  • Reply 46 of 125
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 6,869administrator
    lewchenko said:
    It’s hilarious that the word value was used in the headline. 
    $750 (flagship prices not very long ago) ... now mid range phone prices this year is NOT value. 

    Apple has just reset expectations with its ultra expensive X, XS and XS Max.

    Its a decent enough phone In many ways with a mid tier screen option (resolution wise). But value for money .. only if you are rich! 

    More laughable is not comparing the total cost of ownership to alternatives. This iPhone XR (or the X, XS, and Max) will dramatically outlive most, if not all, of their counterparts with five full years of OS and security support. 

    Yeah, it's a big whack. But to say that all of a sudden Apple has these high prices and that big whack somehow has no value? That's a ludicrous statement to make.
    I can definitely see the XR get 4 years worth of iOS updates.  Five would be pushing it.
    The 5s was released on Sept 20, 2013. That was five years ago. The iPhone 5 got its last update in 2016, four years after its release making five full years of support before it couldn't get more OS updates, as it was incompatible with iOS 11. I see no reason why Apple would cut that five years back.

    Even if you say three years, that still soundly beats the two years that Google has mandated Android devices must get.
    edited October 2018 StrangeDayschiatmaywilliamlondonbb-15
  • Reply 47 of 125
    thttht Posts: 5,498member
    Love the yellow color. Aluminum with a yellow finish not so much.

    The Lightning port not being aligned with the speaker and microphone holes are daggers to my eye. Why, Apple, why? I prefer the antenna break in the XS over this misalignment.
  • Reply 48 of 125
    ireland said:
    At €879 for a 64 GB LCD iPhone, I'm going to say it does not bring value. What it does however it bring the price of iPhones higher than last year. Higher and higher. What Apple has actually done in the past two years is of benefit mostly to shareholders. And the spoiled kids of rich people.
    Apple's obligation is to its shareholders (i.e., its owners). It makes no sense to criticize a company for benefiting its shareholders. More logical, if accurate, would be a criticism that price increases hurt shareholders by reducing profits.
    williamlondon
  • Reply 49 of 125
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    lewchenko said:
    It’s hilarious that the word value was used in the headline. 
    $750 (flagship prices not very long ago) ... now mid range phone prices this year is NOT value. 

    Apple has just reset expectations with its ultra expensive X, XS and XS Max.

    Its a decent enough phone In many ways with a mid tier screen option (resolution wise). But value for money .. only if you are rich! 

    More laughable is not comparing the total cost of ownership to alternatives. This iPhone XR (or the X, XS, and Max) will dramatically outlive most, if not all, of their counterparts with five full years of OS and security support. 

    Yeah, it's a big whack. But to say that all of a sudden Apple has these high prices and that big whack somehow has no value? That's a ludicrous statement to make.
    From 1950 through 1970 all of my parent's cars cost $3,000 and lasted 4 years.
    For my current car the cost skyrocketed to  $20,000 but so far it has lasted 20 years and, according to my mechanic is in pretty good health and should be good for a few more years. 

    That works out to be about the same cost/year -- even if you don't adjust for inflation!
    Not all price hikes are the same!
    Like cars, iPhones are lasting longer now too.

    Plus, as I pointed out earlier, they have minimized the need to buy cameras, landlines and even laptops.
    bb-15
  • Reply 50 of 125
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    lewchenko said:
    It’s hilarious that the word value was used in the headline. 
    $750 (flagship prices not very long ago) ... now mid range phone prices this year is NOT value. 

    Apple has just reset expectations with its ultra expensive X, XS and XS Max.

    Its a decent enough phone In many ways with a mid tier screen option (resolution wise). But value for money .. only if you are rich! 

    More laughable is not comparing the total cost of ownership to alternatives. This iPhone XR (or the X, XS, and Max) will dramatically outlive most, if not all, of their counterparts with five full years of OS and security support. 

    Yeah, it's a big whack. But to say that all of a sudden Apple has these high prices and that big whack somehow has no value? That's a ludicrous statement to make.
    I can definitely see the XR get 4 years worth of iOS updates.  Five would be pushing it.
    The 5s was released on Sept 20, 2013. That was five years ago. The iPhone 5 got its last update in 2016, four years after its release making five full years of support before it couldn't get more OS updates, as it was incompatible with iOS 11. I see no reason why Apple would cut that five years back.

    Even if you say three years, that still soundly beats the two years that Google has mandated Android devices must get.
    I think that was 2017 -- when the 8 was released.

    p.s. And that was mostly because it was 32 bit instead of 64 -- which was limiting updates to the OS (I think mostly the new file system)
    edited October 2018
  • Reply 51 of 125
    irelandireland Posts: 17,798member
    ireland said:
    At €879 for a 64 GB LCD iPhone, I'm going to say it does not bring value. What it does however it bring the price of iPhones higher than last year. Higher and higher. What Apple has actually done in the past two years is of benefit mostly to shareholders. And the spoiled kids of rich people.
    Apple's obligation is to its shareholders (i.e., its owners). It makes no sense to criticize a company for benefiting its shareholders. More logical, if accurate, would be a criticism that price increases hurt shareholders by reducing profits.
    Appel is a typical corporation, yes. My criticism is of the word "value" used in the title of the article. It's a very expensive phone.
    elijahgwilliamlondon
  • Reply 52 of 125
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 6,869administrator
    lewchenko said:
    It’s hilarious that the word value was used in the headline. 
    $750 (flagship prices not very long ago) ... now mid range phone prices this year is NOT value. 

    Apple has just reset expectations with its ultra expensive X, XS and XS Max.

    Its a decent enough phone In many ways with a mid tier screen option (resolution wise). But value for money .. only if you are rich! 

    More laughable is not comparing the total cost of ownership to alternatives. This iPhone XR (or the X, XS, and Max) will dramatically outlive most, if not all, of their counterparts with five full years of OS and security support. 

    Yeah, it's a big whack. But to say that all of a sudden Apple has these high prices and that big whack somehow has no value? That's a ludicrous statement to make.
    I can definitely see the XR get 4 years worth of iOS updates.  Five would be pushing it.
    The 5s was released on Sept 20, 2013. That was five years ago. The iPhone 5 got its last update in 2016, four years after its release making five full years of support before it couldn't get more OS updates, as it was incompatible with iOS 11. I see no reason why Apple would cut that five years back.

    Even if you say three years, that still soundly beats the two years that Google has mandated Android devices must get.
    I think that was 2017 -- when the 8 was released.

    p.s. And that was mostly because it was 32 bit instead of 64 -- which was limiting updates to the OS (I think mostly the new file system)
    iOS 10, in 2016. iOS 11 dropped it in 2017. But yeah, the 32/64 bit thing is the fulcrum.
  • Reply 53 of 125
    Value?  Bahhhhhh!  That's a good one!
    elijahgireland
  • Reply 54 of 125
    sergiozsergioz Posts: 338member
    I am curious about the modem that's being used in iPhone XR. I wonder if its Intel 7660 modem or Intel 7560 modem, which both supports 4x4 MIMO. My suspicion is even though chosen Intell is capable of 4x4 MIMO, Apple didn't include additional antennas to enable Gigabit-class LTE. Please investigate this bit of information for your final review, it'll be interesting to know.
    edited October 2018
  • Reply 55 of 125
    canukstormcanukstorm Posts: 2,719member
    lewchenko said:
    It’s hilarious that the word value was used in the headline. 
    $750 (flagship prices not very long ago) ... now mid range phone prices this year is NOT value. 

    Apple has just reset expectations with its ultra expensive X, XS and XS Max.

    Its a decent enough phone In many ways with a mid tier screen option (resolution wise). But value for money .. only if you are rich! 

    More laughable is not comparing the total cost of ownership to alternatives. This iPhone XR (or the X, XS, and Max) will dramatically outlive most, if not all, of their counterparts with five full years of OS and security support. 

    Yeah, it's a big whack. But to say that all of a sudden Apple has these high prices and that big whack somehow has no value? That's a ludicrous statement to make.
    I can definitely see the XR get 4 years worth of iOS updates.  Five would be pushing it.
    The 5s was released on Sept 20, 2013. That was five years ago. The iPhone 5 got its last update in 2016, four years after its release making five full years of support before it couldn't get more OS updates, as it was incompatible with iOS 11. I see no reason why Apple would cut that five years back.

    Even if you say three years, that still soundly beats the two years that Google has mandated Android devices must get.
    "Even if you say three years, that still soundly beats the two years that Google has mandated Android devices must get."

    That's true.
  • Reply 56 of 125
    airnerd said:
    Inflation is a thing.  You know gas, bread, milk, etc all cost more each year as well.
    If gas was $6 a gallon, bread was $4 a loaf, and milk cost $6 a gallon right now, you would have a valid comparison.  Unlike those commodity goods, consumer electronics typically go down in price over time.  Cameras, televisions, hard disks, even drones just get getting cheaper and cheaper.  Only Apple seems to be able to buck this trend.  It will probably work for a few more years.  But with higher prices you get more intense competition.  It will be interesting to see where Apple is in 4-8 years when iPhone are more like the commodity goods you listed.
    williamlondonmuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 57 of 125
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 6,869administrator
    airnerd said:
    Inflation is a thing.  You know gas, bread, milk, etc all cost more each year as well.
    If gas was $6 a gallon, bread was $4 a loaf, and milk cost $6 a gallon right now, you would have a valid comparison.  Unlike those commodity goods, consumer electronics typically go down in price over time.  Cameras, televisions, hard disks, even drones just get getting cheaper and cheaper.  Only Apple seems to be able to buck this trend.  It will probably work for a few more years.  But with higher prices you get more intense competition.  It will be interesting to see where Apple is in 4-8 years when iPhone are more like the commodity goods you listed.
    I'm sure if the original iPhone specs were unchanged, it would be less than half the price it was at launch too.
    RonnnieO
  • Reply 58 of 125
    canukstormcanukstorm Posts: 2,719member
    airnerd said:
    Inflation is a thing.  You know gas, bread, milk, etc all cost more each year as well.
    If gas was $6 a gallon, bread was $4 a loaf, and milk cost $6 a gallon right now, you would have a valid comparison.  Unlike those commodity goods, consumer electronics typically go down in price over time.  Cameras, televisions, hard disks, even drones just get getting cheaper and cheaper.  Only Apple seems to be able to buck this trend.  It will probably work for a few more years.  But with higher prices you get more intense competition.  It will be interesting to see where Apple is in 4-8 years when iPhone are more like the commodity goods you listed.
    I think Gruber sums it up pretty well:

    https://daringfireball.net/2018/10/iphone_xr_review_roundup

    "A cell phone used to be just a wireless telephone. No longer. They are our ever-present personal computers. They are also our most important cameras (and often our only cameras). A decade ago, point-and-shoot cameras ran $200-400, easily. It’s your watch, it’s your alarm clock, it’s your Walkman, it’s your map and GPS. It’s your wallet full of photos of your family and friends. It’s also, increasing, your actual wallet.

    If you took an iPhone XR back to 2006 people would be amazed. If you told them they could buy one for $750 they’d think you were lying.

    On a related note, I would argue that iPhone prices aren’t really going up. Last year’s X and this year’s XS models are a new premium tier. The iPhone XR is the phone at the previous “regular” top-of-the-line tier. New top-tier iPhones used to cost $600-650, yes, and the iPhone XR starts at $750. But when you account for inflation that starting price is about the same. The iPhone 4 was introduced in June 2010 starting at $600. $600 in June 2010 dollars is about $700 today. That $600 got you a 16 GB iPhone in 2010. The 32 GB model cost $700. That’s about $810 in today’s dollars — $10 more than the price of a 128 GB iPhone XR, which I think is the sweet spot in the lineup for most people. Inflation adjusted, the iPhone XR is right in line with the iPhone 4 prices from 2010.

    Considering how much more capable an iPhone XR is compared to an iPhone 4, I’d say $750 is an amazing bargain."

    edited October 2018 StrangeDaysreiszriechiaGeorgeBMac
  • Reply 59 of 125
    ireland said:
    At €879 for a 64 GB LCD iPhone, I'm going to say it does not bring value. What it does however it bring the price of iPhones higher than last year. Higher and higher. What Apple has actually done in the past two years is of benefit mostly to shareholders. And the spoiled kids of rich people.
    I'm pretty happy with the value my iPhone has given me. I've had it for more than 2 years and it has never been damaged once. I notice it also has a decent resale or trade-in value. Compared to garbage-fire Samsung phones, I think that's pretty good.
    StrangeDays
  • Reply 60 of 125
    robjn said:
    You write: For a start, the resolution of 1,792 by 828 pixels is a lot lower than the Super Retina versions in the XS and Max. This also brings the pixel density down to 326 pixels per inch versus the 458ppi of the other two variants, which may seem disappointing.

    You can’t fairly compare pixel resolution between the two technologies. The OLED is pentile which means the resolution only applies to the green color and those green sub-pixels share very, very low resolution red and blue sub-pixels.

    In fact, the lower resolution LCD display on the XR has MORE sub-pixels per inch (978) than the Super Retina Displays on the XS and XS Max. (916)
    Above 150-200 pixels per inch, the human eye cannot discern the difference, unless a person has 1-inch thick reading glasses, I wouldn't worry about it.
    GeorgeBMac
Sign In or Register to comment.