iPhone replacement cycles slowing down to four years, pose threat to services, analyst say...

12345679»

Comments

  • Reply 161 of 166
    beowulfschmidt said:
    I have little use for Face ID.  I get that it's easy to use and "more accurate" than Touch ID, but Touch ID works just fine for me, considering that I only use it to unlock apps and use Apple Pay, never to unlock my phone.  I can't help but think it would do nothing at all to improve my experience with those use cases. 
    2 more things:
    - Gaze detection prevents the screen from dimming or sleeping while you're reading something. 
    - Notifications can be "revealed" on the lock screen when you're looking at it, for privacy/security.

    It's awesome and miles better than Touch ID for all of these reasons together. Not sure why you wouldn't use either to unlock your phone. You like typing your passcode?
    I don't use it to unlock my phone, because our government can legally compel me to use my finger to unlock my phone.  They cannot legally compel me to reveal the passcode.  Face ID is likely to be categorized like Touch ID, though I have no idea whether that's actually been tested in court yet.

    And before someone utters that inane "if you have nothing to hide..." refrain, nothing that is on my phone is anyone's business.  Not yours, not the guy down the street, not the government. It doesn't matter a whit whether anything on my phone is incriminating now; the way things are going, something likely will be before too much longer.

    As for your other points, "gaze detection" seems like it wouldn't apply to me.  I have my screen dimming set to an interval that makes it unlikely that the screen will dim while I'm in the middle of a page or something.  And notifications are revealed on my lock screen when I raise my phone.  I need nothing more.
    edited February 12 cgWerks
  • Reply 162 of 166
    beowulfschmidt said:
    I have little use for Face ID.  I get that it's easy to use and "more accurate" than Touch ID, but Touch ID works just fine for me, considering that I only use it to unlock apps and use Apple Pay, never to unlock my phone.  I can't help but think it would do nothing at all to improve my experience with those use cases. 
    2 more things:
    - Gaze detection prevents the screen from dimming or sleeping while you're reading something. 
    - Notifications can be "revealed" on the lock screen when you're looking at it, for privacy/security.

    It's awesome and miles better than Touch ID for all of these reasons together. Not sure why you wouldn't use either to unlock your phone. You like typing your passcode?
    I don't use it to unlock my phone, because our government can legally compel me to use my finger to unlock my phone.  They cannot legally compel me to reveal the passcode.  Face ID is likely to be categorized like Touch ID, though I have no idea whether that's actually been tested in court yet.

    And before someone utters that inane "if you have nothing to hide..." refrain, nothing that is on my phone is anyone's business.  Not yours, not the guy down the street, not the government. It doesn't matter a whit whether anything on my phone is incriminating now; the way things are going, something likely will be before too much longer.

    As for your other points, "gaze detection" seems like it wouldn't apply to me.  I have my screen dimming set to an interval that makes it unlikely that the screen will dim while I'm in the middle of a page or something.  And notifications are revealed on my lock screen when I raise my phone.  I need nothing more.
    Okay then.

    Anyway, hopefully the law continues more in this direction:
    https://nakedsecurity.sophos.com/2019/01/16/police-cant-compel-biometric-phone-unlocking-rules-judge/
  • Reply 163 of 166
    cgWerks said:
    fastasleep said:
    It's not irrelevant. First off, they were never subsidizing your phone! Also, you can definitely get better prices on data plans separated from devices now than you could with a device "subsidy" (if you want to keep using that misnomer) rolled in.

    Back in the day I paid over $100/month for my iPhone plan with AT&T. I pay $60 now with T-Mobile (for an actual unlimited plan with better benefits than what AT&T offered) plus $30 payments for my iPhone X for the next few months, after which it goes back to just $60/month. You do the math.
    Sorry to keep using that term, I suppose you're right. What I was trying to say is that early on (at least from what I remember) you'd pay closer to what plans are now, but you were paying off the phone in that, so the actual cellular voice/data portion of the bill was lower. Now, you pay more outright, and monthly for the phone, AND THEN they load on the higher voice/data rates as well.

    Maybe you're right about the initial cost of the AT&T plan, as I didn't have one back then. But, I think I remember $60-$80 plans that included the phone and voice/data at one point. Now you pay more outright for the phone + a lot of people pay $100+ for the plans, too.

    I guess things are now getting more competitive in the USA, it seems. That hasn't really happened up here in Canada. The only thing they are doing is slowing including a bit more data each year, but the prices have held steady or gone up.

    Same with Internet access. People used to pay, say $100 to have Cable and everything. Then the 'cord cutting' started. Now, people pay $100+ for Internet AND, then extra for TV or lots of individual payments to various subscription services. So, in effect, they are paying more now than before they started 'cord cutting.'

    How does $30 a month for a few months for an iPhone X work, though? More like 2 to 3 years?
    The point is, things are more transparent now with the cost of the device clearly outlined in most cases, whereas in the past people knew what they were paying for the down payment ($200/300) and not much else. Either way, the assertion that one only paid $200-300 for a new iPhone is false.

    And I meant I have like 2 or 3 months left in payments on my iPhone X. I paid $430 down and the rest of the payments were over 24 months. Or something like that.

    cgWerks said:
    fastasleep said:
    2 more things:
    - Gaze detection prevents the screen from dimming or sleeping while you're reading something. 
    - Notifications can be "revealed" on the lock screen when you're looking at it, for privacy/security.

    It's awesome and miles better than Touch ID for all of these reasons together. Not sure why you wouldn't use either to unlock your phone. You like typing your passcode?
    OK, those are a couple interesting features if you need to keep your screen dimming that aggressive. Can you set it so it won't unlock when it detects your face, if you aren't also doing something else? My main issues I think I'd have with it, are that it would unlock when I don't want it to... and that I'd have a hard time getting it to unlock when the phone is mounted in the car or other such times when my face might not be in front of it.
    You don't set anything to aggressive, you just let iOS manage it for you — it automatically dims if you're not looking, which saves battery etc. I don't know what you mean about unlocking when you don't want it to, if you're using it would you not want it to unlock? And if you mount it in your car facing you, which obviously would be what you'd want, you won't have a problem there.
  • Reply 164 of 166
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 2,165member
    fastasleep said:
    Anyway, hopefully the law continues more in this direction:
    Yeah, though a trend is also forming where the government doesn't follow the law. :disappointed:

    Even if the evidence they might gain isn't directly admissible, they might find some round-about way to use it. Kind of like the USA figured out a way to spy on US citizens via their programs to spy on other countries.

    fastasleep said:
    You don't set anything to aggressive, you just let iOS manage it for you — it automatically dims if you're not looking, which saves battery etc. I don't know what you mean about unlocking when you don't want it to, if you're using it would you not want it to unlock? And if you mount it in your car facing you, which obviously would be what you'd want, you won't have a problem there.
    Using it, yes, but just because I'm looking at it doesn't mean I'm using it and want it to unlock. Does that make sense? Maybe I'm not understanding how it works. With Touch ID, look at my phone, or turn my phone on,  and/or look at the lock screen, and unless I put my finger on the sensor, it won't unlock.

    re: car - Yes, if it is mounted in something like a dash or radio mount, I suppose. But, if it's in a cubby in the center console, or laying on the passenger seat, etc. you could unlock it with Touch ID, but you'd have to lean over it or pick it up to unlock with Face ID, I'd think.
    edited February 14
  • Reply 165 of 166
    cgWerks said:

    Using it, yes, but just because I'm looking at it doesn't mean I'm using it and want it to unlock. Does that make sense? Maybe I'm not understanding how it works. With Touch ID, look at my phone, or turn my phone on,  and/or look at the lock screen, and unless I put my finger on the sensor, it won't unlock.
    Yeah, but why would you not want it to unlock? For example, when you look at your lock screen, your notifications don't reveal any details until it detects you looking at the phone. That's awesome, IMHO. But what's the advantage to keeping it locked?
    re: car - Yes, if it is mounted in something like a dash or radio mount, I suppose. But, if it's in a cubby in the center console, or laying on the passenger seat, etc. you could unlock it with Touch ID, but you'd have to lean over it or pick it up to unlock with Face ID, I'd think.
    Again, if what's the advantage to using your finger here? If you're going to look at it for any reason, you might as well unlock it when you do. And ideally you'd have it mounted somewhere you can easily access it anyway, if you have to dig around for it you might as well be bringing it up with your line of sight to the road. Not sure what scenario where looking down and having to touch your phone that's buried in a cubby hole is a better idea than Face ID. 
  • Reply 166 of 166
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 2,165member
    cgWerks said:

    Using it, yes, but just because I'm looking at it doesn't mean I'm using it and want it to unlock. Does that make sense? Maybe I'm not understanding how it works. With Touch ID, look at my phone, or turn my phone on,  and/or look at the lock screen, and unless I put my finger on the sensor, it won't unlock.
    Yeah, but why would you not want it to unlock? For example, when you look at your lock screen, your notifications don't reveal any details until it detects you looking at the phone. That's awesome, IMHO. But what's the advantage to keeping it locked?
    re: car - Yes, if it is mounted in something like a dash or radio mount, I suppose. But, if it's in a cubby in the center console, or laying on the passenger seat, etc. you could unlock it with Touch ID, but you'd have to lean over it or pick it up to unlock with Face ID, I'd think.
    Again, if what's the advantage to using your finger here? If you're going to look at it for any reason, you might as well unlock it when you do. And ideally you'd have it mounted somewhere you can easily access it anyway, if you have to dig around for it you might as well be bringing it up with your line of sight to the road. Not sure what scenario where looking down and having to touch your phone that's buried in a cubby hole is a better idea than Face ID. 
    Well, I suppose at the core, it somewhat comes down to my rather being in control vs some algorithm Apple engineers designed. I've just worked in tech far too long to trust it. :smile: 

    But, if I want to see notifications on my screen - say, while walking through the airport - I'd rather not have my phone unlock in case someone grabs it. It's more a security thing, I guess. I want to determine when it unlocks, not the phone.

    Before I figured out a somewhat reasonable way of mounting my phone in my car, I used to wedge it into the center console. I knew where it was, so I could unlock it with my thumb/finger with minimal distraction, and I didn't pick it up. Though, yeah, to be honest, I often kept it unlocked while driving anyway, as it was plugged into power, etc.

    I actually try not to fiddle with the phone at all while driving, actually. So, having it mounted hasn't helped much of anything except being able to see the map during navigation. I use Siri once in a while to pause/play (which it often messes up anyway in 3rd party apps). And, since it can't answer a call or hang-up, I pretty much just pull over to do most everything anyway. (I also listen mostly to podcasts, so I have hours of content where I don't need to change anything.)

    BTW, I finally figured out one of my old problems of not being able to play my 'Favorites' playlist in Music. It turns out, 'Favorites' must be a reserved term (but, it let me create a Favorites playlist, which I've had for many years), so once I changed the playlist name, now I can start it playing via Siri. That said, the error message was completely erroneous in figuring it out. It complained about not having cellular data, when I had the cellular data turned on for that stuff.
Sign In or Register to comment.