Apple being sued because two-factor authentication on an iPhone or Mac takes too much time...

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Comments

  • Reply 61 of 120
    All this time and money wasted, when all they really need to do is just use a windows device for a day to get a little perspective. 
    DAalseth
  • Reply 62 of 120
    What a moron. If anything, users should sue Apple for forcing them to use an E-mail address as their user ID, and refusing to consolidate the resulting multiple Apple accounts that people inadvertently set up. The lay user can easily then lose apps or other content that they've purchased with old Apple IDs, when their E-mail address changes (with a job, ISP switch, whatever). The stupidity of using an E-mail address as a user ID is neatly summed up here: https://goldmanosi.blogspot.com/2012/06/forcing-people-to-use-e-mail-address-as.html
    netmagemicrobe
  • Reply 63 of 120
    eriamjheriamjh Posts: 1,108member
    Security may be inconvenient.  One must be able to disable it, but that itself creates insecurity.   

    I guess if if you lose to sell your other device, there needs to be a way to change or disable it.   Otherwise, you’re totally screwed.   
    edited February 9
  • Reply 64 of 120
    baron von chilidogbaron von chilidog Posts: 1unconfirmed, member
    Two-factor authentication is out there for a reason, and it is up to the user to use it or not. Apple is a big pain in the *** with its "reminders", (not to mention the fact, for those of us that don't use an iPhone, that Apple then has another channel to annoy us with). I will use it if I need it. Now shut up.
  • Reply 65 of 120
    Can’t wait till the judge throws this one out, laughing hysterically while he or she does it. Meanwhile, the winner is...the lawyers. 

    Its too bad the judge can’t award court costs to the attorneys with the stipulation they can’t pass it along to their client—even though their client is a complete buffoon. 
  • Reply 66 of 120
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,013member
    The filer is a whiner and a complete idiot  Can you imagine what he’d do if someone hacked into his iCloud account?
    He'd sue Apple no doubt.
  • Reply 67 of 120
    Suits like this are why lawyers are held in such low esteem..
    Solinetmage
  • Reply 68 of 120
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 1,957member
    mset68 said:
    ridiculous. it takes less than 10 seconds
    Not if you don't have the 2nd factor with you.

    I want to sue this dude for trying to make our Apple ID accounts less secure.
    Apple already took care of that with 'security questions.'
    microbe
  • Reply 69 of 120
    It is a right pain & they need to give me the option to turn it off.
    microbe
  • Reply 70 of 120
    For people who don’t know, you can set more then 1 device to receive the code. you can even set it to go to more then 1 phone number. I have both my phone number and my wife’s phone numbers. My iPhone, iPad, iMac, Macbook Pro, my wife’s iPhone, and my 1 and only Windows computer. When I sign into my account or a new device, any device that is powered on will get the alert. One top of all
    of that, I changed all of my passwords to be the suggested strong passwords, and activated 2FA on all of my accounts, using the Authy authenticator app. 

    I recently had a friend who had his phone spoofed and email compromised, they wiped him clean. Took all of his money, and started charging things to his ebay account and amazon account. He was able to stop a lot of it, and froze all of his accounts. But when he called me it made me realize I needed to better secure myself, which led me to what I said earlier. 
  • Reply 71 of 120
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 1,958member
    entropys said:
    “The first thing we do, let’s kill all the lawyers”
    I agree that this is a bizarre thing to start a lawsuit over, but the lawyer killing quote is even worse. I mean, an “all lawyers are bad” mentality is pretty ludicrous too.
  • Reply 72 of 120
    mac_128mac_128 Posts: 3,377member
    patsu said:.

    There needs to be a fallback that works when other trusted devices are not available. 
    There is already a fallback when your trusted devices are unavailable. It's your trusted phone numbers:

    You'll receive the code via text or an automated call.


    If for some unholy reasons you hate (free !) trusted phone numbers, there is also another way. Buy 1 more small/cheap Apple device for backup 2FA handling. I have 1 iPhone, 1 iPad and 1 Mac. Should be pretty robust where 2FA token is concerned.


    Other companies like Microsoft use this awfully silly long code as your last backup code. Everyone has to write or print it for safekeeping. I never remember where I keep that piece of paper. So it's completely useless in this regard.

    Using a small hardware token is also asking for more trouble. It's one more thing to lose. And it's the ONLY one. Lose it and you're done for.
    I guess your trusted numbers are good unless your numbers been sim-spoofed.

    Or your phone is lost or stolen.

    A token can be lost or stolen, but then it’s the backup to the device which could be lost or stolen. I don’t think anyone is suggesting it be the exclusive way 2FA is handled. But carrying around an aresenal of extra devices everywhere a person goes, is not the solution either.
  • Reply 74 of 120
    Lol.. using the same logic, he should sue fast food restaurants and his employer should be able to sue him for taking a dump too long and missing productivity. 
    netmagestompy
  • Reply 75 of 120
    patsupatsu Posts: 428member
    cgWerks said:
    patsu said:
    Not really. 

    Such a reversal will need an equally strong security to prevent bad guys from turning off your 2FA at will.
    That means you'll need your 2FA to turn off your 2FA, which won't help the plaintiff anyway when he's already in trouble. :-)
    No, not if it works such that when you're authenticated and into your account (ie: already authenticated using 2FA) then you can turn it off.


    Not really. You'll still be asked for your password again even if you're logged in (just like when you try to change your password).

    Bottomline is downgrading a 2FA account is bad news. It weakens the 2FA for people who adopted 2FA.

    patsu said:
    There is already a fallback when your trusted devices are unavailable. It's your trusted phone numbers:
    You'll receive the code via text or an automated call.
    So much for any security of 2FA, then.


    Any 2FA that uses telco infrastructure to deliver the 2FA code can be hacked by spoofing SIM assuming the attacker knows your trusted phone number.

    patsu said:
    Other companies like Microsoft use this awfully silly long code as your last backup code. Everyone has to write or print it for safekeeping. I never remember where I keep that piece of paper. So it's completely useless in this regard.
    A home safe? But, then yeah, it wouldn't help you while traveling. But, it's more secure than Apple's 2FA (w/ security questions and that backup SMS).

    If you have a low-tech, low-security path in, then the whole system is compromised by that. At least if it's a complex code you keep in your safe, it is a relatively high security entry point on the scale of the on-line world. Security questions and SMS are hacker's dreams.

    That long complex code is completely useless if lost. Or worse, found by someone else.
    If you're traveling, it's useless too.
    And there are malware that search for such code on your computer if you keep a copy on your PC.

    When I travel, I take my phone and an iPad or Mac with me. So no problem to retrieve 2FA code while traveling for me !
    I find Apple's implementation the most balanced to-date.

    edited February 10
  • Reply 76 of 120
    patsupatsu Posts: 428member
    mac_128 said:
    patsu said:.

    There needs to be a fallback that works when other trusted devices are not available. 
    There is already a fallback when your trusted devices are unavailable. It's your trusted phone numbers:

    You'll receive the code via text or an automated call.


    If for some unholy reasons you hate (free !) trusted phone numbers, there is also another way. Buy 1 more small/cheap Apple device for backup 2FA handling. I have 1 iPhone, 1 iPad and 1 Mac. Should be pretty robust where 2FA token is concerned.


    Other companies like Microsoft use this awfully silly long code as your last backup code. Everyone has to write or print it for safekeeping. I never remember where I keep that piece of paper. So it's completely useless in this regard.

    Using a small hardware token is also asking for more trouble. It's one more thing to lose. And it's the ONLY one. Lose it and you're done for.
    I guess your trusted numbers are good unless your numbers been sim-spoofed.

    Or your phone is lost or stolen.

    A token can be lost or stolen, but then it’s the backup to the device which could be lost or stolen. I don’t think anyone is suggesting it be the exclusive way 2FA is handled. But carrying around an aresenal of extra devices everywhere a person goes, is not the solution either.
    I don't use a trusted number myself. If I do use it, will probably pick an unused number in a family plan, or my home phone.

    Had lost my phone temporarily before. Not a big deal. My iPad is easily accessible even on a trip.
    1 iPad is not an arsenal. I use it for bedtime reading and trip research anyway. :-)

    A true 2FA hardware token is not a backup. It is THE token. Had to request the bank to get a new one when I lost it.
  • Reply 77 of 120
    I would agree with the lawsuit. The two factor authentication process is time consuming and inconvenient for the users.  
    Apple should work on another way to strengthen security. What happened to simple and intuitive philosophy of Apple’s? 
    Yeah, I can see where 22 seconds periodically would be a major drag on your day.
    I think something else occurred to spark the lawsuit.  See my other looong post.
    Or better yet, they switch to android phones....dont missed up w us satisfied w this security 
  • Reply 78 of 120
    Are there alternatives to two-factor authentication? Sure, how about Apple actually determining who I am? If Apple is too cheap to come up with their own way, why don't they just use something that we already use to prove our identity, like our passport or other valid IDs? And I could show my physical IDs to an Apple representative in a FaceTime session, since that technology works fine. I know half of you will think I'm joking, but I'm not. I understand each nation has its own ID documents, but Apple is big enough to handle that.
    cgWerks
  • Reply 79 of 120
    discopants123discopants123 Posts: 3unconfirmed, member
    I’ll just say that two factor identification is one thing when it’s your account and your computer.  And you know everything in memory.

    And it’s another thing for say my parents in their 80s to know all of this.  They don’t have smart phones (don’t want them either and yes I’ve tried) so can’t receive text messages via mobile.

    I spent the last few evenings trying to get them up to speed. It was not easy. My dad somehow enter the password in the iPad he was setting up that I gave him doesn’t even remember it and it locked and then the whole reset process took two damn days.

    The thing that bugs me the most, is that after I have all of the devices there and I’ve entered all of the passwords and done everything, it seems like minutes later I can get asked to enter all of that information again. That is extremely tedious when you’re doing that for somebody else. Seriously Apple if you just asked me for the password a minute ago don’t bother me with that again for 15 more minutes at least please. 
    cgWerks
  • Reply 80 of 120
    lwiolwio Posts: 82member
    Security can be a pita but it’s there for a reason. The same person, amongst others, would be suing if someone easily broke into their device. I’m sure the first person who had to carry a key was pissed off too. 
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