IBM's 200,000 Macs have made a happier, more productive workforce

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  • Reply 41 of 46
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 6,832administrator
    Mike,

    Do you have any details on IBM's Environment, Usage Policies, Restrictions etc.

    For Example are these Macs tied to a Microsoft Active Directory Envionment?

    Are the users local admins or standard restricted users ?

    Is the Apple Store Blocked on all Macs ?

    Is Personal Apple ID usage banned or blocked ?

    How does IBM prevent Apple users from syncing everything they can get their hands on to a personal iCloud account ?

    Also what other options does IBM offer besides IBM workstations and Apple products - Could an employee pickup a Sony or Dell ?

    ---- Cherry picking the statistics which make your Turd glitters is great but it doesn't stop it from smelling.
    Are the Macs tied to a Microsoft Active Directory: Some are, most aren't.

    Are the users local admins or standard restricted users: Varies on the work center.

    Is the Apple Store blocked on all Macs: Some, but not most.

    Is Personal Apple ID usage banned or blocked: On some, but not most.

    Prevent personal iCloud syncing: This can be stopped with device management profiles.

    There are different rules for different groups of people, and none of your questions have any bearing to the IBM-reported statistics. If you're actually an IT admin, you know this already.

    In regards to "cherry picking" - talk to IBM about it if you're so inclined. Literally, all of the statistics they provided are included. I'm not sure why the study bothers you so much.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 42 of 46
    ---- Cherry picking the statistics which make your Turd glitters is great but it doesn't stop it from smelling. 
    Kinda hard not to laugh when you finish one post with this line then your very next post is your own cherry picked, anecdotal numbers.
    cornchipFileMakerFeller
  • Reply 43 of 46
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    loopless said:
    How the worm has turned....
    I support PC's and Mac's. If things are working well it's hard to say MacOS is better than Windows 10 for a pro user. But when things go bad with Windows, they turn into a complete and utter nightmare than can suck your soul dry. Plus the hardware , at least Dell machines, is of a measurably lower quality. They just fail more often. I have had 3 or 4 motherboards replaced out of 20 machines.
    Odd Loopless on a percentage bases I have had a higher percentage of out of box failures on apple products - logicaboard, keyboards, USB C ports etc,  than I do with Dell's though we do stick with the Latitude and Optiplex lines.

    With Apple we endure 5-10 days of down time to remote diagnose with Apple to have to box and ship the thing off and wait for them to repair it offsite and ship it back.
    With Dell it usually a 10-30 minute phone call resulting an on-site coming to our office with replacement parts to service the machine the next day.  Total down time 2 days on par.

    A typical Apple Hardware support ticket needs about 16 hours of our help desk staff's time to work with Apple, ship it, receive it, and reload software before it can be returned to the user.  Plus the 5-10 days at the repair center.  -  The closed Apple Store is over 4 hours away

    A typical Dell Hardware support ticket needs about 3 hours of our staff's time to diagnose report, greet the tech the next day, and push a clean image to workstation after the repair is complete.

    Our Cost to support Apple is 5x what we spend on Dell by machine not including the over inflated cost of apple hardware.
    That's a good point:   My experience with HP (and a rare Dell) was that we would call support, review the problem and they would overnight ship a replacement part.   We had to install it ourselves (usually a harddrive or something simple).  But, although the failures were far too common, the service was quick and efficient.
  • Reply 44 of 46
    netroxnetrox Posts: 1,412member
    ...
    employees that used Mac machines were 22 percent more likely to exceed expectations in performance reviews compared to Windows users. Employees generating sales deals has 16% larger proceeds from Mac users as well.
    ...

    I guess having read enumerable medical studies proving that black is white and the sun rises in the west, and having started as an accountant fully cognizant of the truth behind the saying that:  "Figures lie and liars figure", I have become quite cynical of statistics -- particularly those that fail the smell test.

    In the case of medical studies it has become generally accepted in the medical community that the primary determinant of the outcome of a study is who funded the study.   And, we all know about accountants and lawyers...

    This one fails the smell test.  It reeks of using statistics to prove a point.
    Are Macs better in the business environment?   Very likely -- particularly if you it's a favorable environment.   But, these stats sound highly suspicious to me.
    Yeah, IBM that also stared its business selling PCs funded a study and found that their competitor, Apple, have Macs which are just better at boosting productivty.  

    I am way much more productive on a Mac than Windows/Unbuntu despite using them daily. Macs just have this cohesive user experience. I mean does anyone even realize that MacOS is a better Unix than Linux and MacOS is far better than Windows. The specs themselves mean absolutely nothing if they don't make users more productive overall. 
    edited November 2019
  • Reply 45 of 46
    Matches my own experience of deploying Mac's in a local government planning department. They easily paid for themselves inside twelve months through increased productivity. The IT manager fought hard to stop us at every turn, because support requests from the mac users were zero, compared to around two to three requests a month from the PC users.
  • Reply 46 of 46
    rob53 said:
    Duh! Every user of Apple products knows this. 
    That's a bit facile, in the enterprise context, where things are a lot more complicated.

    This is exactly the kind of news and analysis that enterprises need to hear more of: I will be passing this article on to the head of IT in my organization, for sure.

    (Was there  a link to the IBM study in the article?)
    Not yet. When they publish the entire piece, we'll link to it. We're on the ground at the Jamf conference.
    Is there any link to the study or presentation at this point?
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