New Apple Watch Series 6 has blood oxygen sensor & bright new colors

123468

Comments

  • Reply 101 of 160
    Still waiting for ecg in Australia! I wonder if oxygen sensor will work here or will Australia have to wait 5 or six years:/
  • Reply 102 of 160
    dbvapor said:
    Same design?  This thing looks like the original iPad.  It’s design is looking old and tired.  I was really hoping for a redesign.  The current watch is too bulky and looks ancient compared to iPhone 11.  My question is.. does the Apple Watch still try to connect to the iPhone for everything even when it’s not nearby?  It’s so annoying.  If my phone is on a charger and I’m on the other side of the house I can’t sent a text.  It sucks.  

    Then you need to get one with LTE which makes it far more independent of the phone.   When it was introduced with the Series 3 they showed Dierdra out in the middle of a lake on paddle board reporting back to Apple Headquarters.    (The watch worked perfectly but she looked really nervous as she wobbled on that board!).

    Did you not know that when you bought your watch -- that if you don't get LTE on the watch that it has to rely on LTE from your phone?   Or, is it an old, pre-LTE model?
  • Reply 103 of 160
    dewme said:
    dewme said:
    My Apple Watch 5 is less than a year old and I'm tempted to upgrade to get the blood oxygen sensor.

    Question: The article above mentions "sleep apnea" but the demonstrations of the oxygen sensor shown in the video today make the oxygen sensing feature look like an interactive process. This alone wouldn't really do much for sleep apnea sufferers because the greatest threat occurs when they are asleep. To be truly effective for sleep apnea detection the oxygen measurement should take place periodically and whenever the device detects the user has suddenly stopped breathing, is snoring, or is gasping for air. I didn't see anything in the video that talked about how this new sensor would potentially be employed for sleep apnea detection and monitoring.

    Like everything else health related on the Apple Watch, it is not a substitute for the advanced diagnostics that are performed in a clinical setting under the care of a doctor or medical professionals. But it is a tool that can be used to alert you to a potential issue that requires further attention by a medical professional. I'm wondering how this model applies to the detection and treatment of sleep apnea used in conjunction with the Apple Watch 6.
    Watch it again. They said it would take background readings throughout the day. 

    I’m upgrading from my 3 partially because I’m curious about sleep apnea. I just haven’t been able to figure if I want the new silicone loop or just the original sport band. 
    Thanks. That is good news. I keyed in on the on-demand part with the countdown timer on the video and missed the background sampling part.  

    I now see on the Apple.com website: "The remarkable new sensor and app in Apple Watch Series 6 allow you to take on-demand readings of your blood oxygen as well as background readings, day and night." That is a big deal.

    Background readings are vital. Triggering background readings when an "event" occurs would be very important as well, but we won't really know what the watch can until we see this feature in action in the real world. I'm sure Apple tested it, but I'm also sure that Apple does not want to overstate its capabilities or set expectations too high. Some other health monitor band/watch companies have made claims about sleep apnea detection using other sensors, like pulse rate, but these claims don't seem to result in product features, which I suppose due to liability concerns. Apple is very very careful about making any health related claims.

    Regarding at-home CPAP machines - the ones I've used do have a SIM card and, at times, a modem and telemetry, but the only thing they are recording is usage and pressure. It's mainly there to verify that you are using the machine. They don't have any other sensors. The reason ongoing oxygen monitoring is needed is because the pressure on the machine may have to be adjusted periodically, i.e., it may no longer be helping you. Getting everything set correctly requires an overnight sleep study, and these can cost thousands of dollars to administer. If the AW6 can tell you you may need a study it will serve a very important purpose.

    I agree with the value and benefit of event triggered monitoring -- such as regular or even continuous monitoring during aerobic activity -- especially during periods of elevated heart rate.    During a tempo run my heart rate can run well over 90% of its Max and knowing how my SpO2 levels did would be great information.
    ...  But, as you say, we don't know enough right now.  We'll have to wait for some hands-on testing to know if and how this works.

    As for CPAP machines and sleep:  I am hoping that eventually Apple can replace the need for most sleep studies which, unless you're having a known and significant problem seem pretty sketchy to me -- mostly self proclaimed experts who little about their specialty but who make lots of money selling their snake oil.   Before I trusted one of them I would want to loaded up with facts on what exactly was going on with my body.   As for them monitoring the CPAP machine, please remember that the healthcare industry cares nothing about your health and only about its profits.
  • Reply 104 of 160
    dewme said:
    dewme said:
    My Apple Watch 5 is less than a year old and I'm tempted to upgrade to get the blood oxygen sensor.

    Question: The article above mentions "sleep apnea" but the demonstrations of the oxygen sensor shown in the video today make the oxygen sensing feature look like an interactive process. This alone wouldn't really do much for sleep apnea sufferers because the greatest threat occurs when they are asleep. To be truly effective for sleep apnea detection the oxygen measurement should take place periodically and whenever the device detects the user has suddenly stopped breathing, is snoring, or is gasping for air. I didn't see anything in the video that talked about how this new sensor would potentially be employed for sleep apnea detection and monitoring.

    Like everything else health related on the Apple Watch, it is not a substitute for the advanced diagnostics that are performed in a clinical setting under the care of a doctor or medical professionals. But it is a tool that can be used to alert you to a potential issue that requires further attention by a medical professional. I'm wondering how this model applies to the detection and treatment of sleep apnea used in conjunction with the Apple Watch 6.
    Watch it again. They said it would take background readings throughout the day. 

    I’m upgrading from my 3 partially because I’m curious about sleep apnea. I just haven’t been able to figure if I want the new silicone loop or just the original sport band. 
    Thanks. That is good news. I keyed in on the on-demand part with the countdown timer on the video and missed the background sampling part.  

    I now see on the Apple.com website: "The remarkable new sensor and app in Apple Watch Series 6 allow you to take on-demand readings of your blood oxygen as well as background readings, day and night." That is a big deal.

    Background readings are vital. Triggering background readings when an "event" occurs would be very important as well, but we won't really know what the watch can until we see this feature in action in the real world. I'm sure Apple tested it, but I'm also sure that Apple does not want to overstate its capabilities or set expectations too high. Some other health monitor band/watch companies have made claims about sleep apnea detection using other sensors, like pulse rate, but these claims don't seem to result in product features, which I suppose due to liability concerns. Apple is very very careful about making any health related claims.

    Regarding at-home CPAP machines - the ones I've used do have a SIM card and, at times, a modem and telemetry, but the only thing they are recording is usage and pressure. It's mainly there to verify that you are using the machine. They don't have any other sensors. The reason ongoing oxygen monitoring is needed is because the pressure on the machine may have to be adjusted periodically, i.e., it may no longer be helping you. Getting everything set correctly requires an overnight sleep study, and these can cost thousands of dollars to administer. If the AW6 can tell you you may need a study it will serve a very important purpose.

    I agree with the value and benefit of event triggered monitoring -- such as regular or even continuous monitoring during aerobic activity -- especially during periods of elevated heart rate.    During a tempo run my heart rate can run well over 90% of its Max and knowing how my SpO2 levels did would be great information.
    ...  But, as you say, we don't know enough right now.  We'll have to wait for some hands-on testing to know if and how this works.

    As for CPAP machines and sleep:  I am hoping that eventually Apple can replace the need for most sleep studies which, unless you're having a known and significant problem seem pretty sketchy to me -- mostly self proclaimed experts who little about their specialty but who make lots of money selling their snake oil.   Before I trusted one of them I would want to loaded up with facts on what exactly was going on with my body.   As for them monitoring the CPAP machine, please remember that the healthcare industry cares nothing about your health and only about its profits.
  • Reply 105 of 160
    dewme said:
    dewme said:
    My Apple Watch 5 is less than a year old and I'm tempted to upgrade to get the blood oxygen sensor.

    Question: The article above mentions "sleep apnea" but the demonstrations of the oxygen sensor shown in the video today make the oxygen sensing feature look like an interactive process. This alone wouldn't really do much for sleep apnea sufferers because the greatest threat occurs when they are asleep. To be truly effective for sleep apnea detection the oxygen measurement should take place periodically and whenever the device detects the user has suddenly stopped breathing, is snoring, or is gasping for air. I didn't see anything in the video that talked about how this new sensor would potentially be employed for sleep apnea detection and monitoring.

    Like everything else health related on the Apple Watch, it is not a substitute for the advanced diagnostics that are performed in a clinical setting under the care of a doctor or medical professionals. But it is a tool that can be used to alert you to a potential issue that requires further attention by a medical professional. I'm wondering how this model applies to the detection and treatment of sleep apnea used in conjunction with the Apple Watch 6.
    Watch it again. They said it would take background readings throughout the day. 

    I’m upgrading from my 3 partially because I’m curious about sleep apnea. I just haven’t been able to figure if I want the new silicone loop or just the original sport band. 
    Thanks. That is good news. I keyed in on the on-demand part with the countdown timer on the video and missed the background sampling part.  

    I now see on the Apple.com website: "The remarkable new sensor and app in Apple Watch Series 6 allow you to take on-demand readings of your blood oxygen as well as background readings, day and night." That is a big deal.

    Background readings are vital. Triggering background readings when an "event" occurs would be very important as well, but we won't really know what the watch can until we see this feature in action in the real world. I'm sure Apple tested it, but I'm also sure that Apple does not want to overstate its capabilities or set expectations too high. Some other health monitor band/watch companies have made claims about sleep apnea detection using other sensors, like pulse rate, but these claims don't seem to result in product features, which I suppose due to liability concerns. Apple is very very careful about making any health related claims.

    Regarding at-home CPAP machines - the ones I've used do have a SIM card and, at times, a modem and telemetry, but the only thing they are recording is usage and pressure. It's mainly there to verify that you are using the machine. They don't have any other sensors. The reason ongoing oxygen monitoring is needed is because the pressure on the machine may have to be adjusted periodically, i.e., it may no longer be helping you. Getting everything set correctly requires an overnight sleep study, and these can cost thousands of dollars to administer. If the AW6 can tell you you may need a study it will serve a very important purpose.

    I agree with the value and benefit of event triggered monitoring -- such as regular or even continuous monitoring during aerobic activity -- especially during periods of elevated heart rate.    During a tempo run my heart rate can run well over 90% of its Max and knowing how my SpO2 levels did would be great information.
    ...  But, as you say, we don't know enough right now.  We'll have to wait for some hands-on testing to know if and how this works.

    As for CPAP machines and sleep:  I am hoping that eventually Apple can replace the need for most sleep studies which, unless you're having a known and significant problem seem pretty sketchy to me -- mostly self proclaimed experts who little about their specialty but who make lots of money selling their snake oil.   Before I trusted one of them I would want to loaded up with facts on what exactly was going on with my body.   As for them monitoring the CPAP machine, please remember that the healthcare industry cares nothing about your health and only about its profits.
    Everything is sketchy to you. CPAP machines work. Sleep studies are done so that they can diagnose your condition and treat it correctly. Type of treatment (machine, surgery) and settings are determined after a sleep study. Can an AppleWatch replace a sleep study? Not yet, but it can provide a lot of useful data to your doctor if everyone was on the same page. I was really hoping for a body temperature setting. That is needed for accurate sleep analysis.

    And by the way as soon as you apply your “they don’t care about you” philosophy to BOTH political parties, you’ll be truly woke.
    SpamSandwich
  • Reply 106 of 160
    Xed said:

    Beats said:
    Beats said:
    Beats said:
    They briefly mentioned Covid-19. How accurate is this for DETECTING a new infection in users? I'm guessing they would have drove that point home if it were accurate.
    Low blood oxygen isn’t only related to COVID-19, they started on this feature long before that was even a thing. Not to mention FDA regulations, you can’t “detect” a virus based on a singular symptom.

    I figured. Just thought Tim Cook would go overdrive on engineering to get it on the market ASAP.

    The FDA would definitely hate any "detection" but I thought they could alert you on the possibility like a notification saying "You are showing symptoms of Covid-19. Tap here for details and recommended measures to take" To avoid violating laws.
    That statement would be illegal. You cannot allow people to self diagnose disease with consumer electronics. Not sure how else to explain this. 

    How is that a diagnosis?
    “You are showing symptoms of Covid-19.” is a diagnosis. It could literally be any other reason their O2 levels are low. How is this not clear?
    It's one of many possible symptoms.

    Read up.
    I believe his point is that Apple won't say "You have COVID-19" simply because you have a symptom of COVID-19. That's a post hoc fallacy. Because of this, therefore that. It would simply tell you what symptom you have. It's like saying "You've fallen from a ladder" when the Watch detects a fall instead of saying it detects a fall. Sure, being up high on a ladder can lead to a fall, but there are countless other reasons. It's the problem with people using WebMD to self-diagnose based on a minimal symptom recognition.
    Um... That's basically what I am saying. The use of word "possible" obviates any post-hoc fallacy, apart from which well-known science on blood oxygen levels renders your (and the OP's) point moot.

    Did you reply to the wrong person?
    edited September 2020
  • Reply 107 of 160
    XedXed Posts: 2,461member
    Xed said:

    Beats said:
    Beats said:
    Beats said:
    They briefly mentioned Covid-19. How accurate is this for DETECTING a new infection in users? I'm guessing they would have drove that point home if it were accurate.
    Low blood oxygen isn’t only related to COVID-19, they started on this feature long before that was even a thing. Not to mention FDA regulations, you can’t “detect” a virus based on a singular symptom.

    I figured. Just thought Tim Cook would go overdrive on engineering to get it on the market ASAP.

    The FDA would definitely hate any "detection" but I thought they could alert you on the possibility like a notification saying "You are showing symptoms of Covid-19. Tap here for details and recommended measures to take" To avoid violating laws.
    That statement would be illegal. You cannot allow people to self diagnose disease with consumer electronics. Not sure how else to explain this. 

    How is that a diagnosis?
    “You are showing symptoms of Covid-19.” is a diagnosis. It could literally be any other reason their O2 levels are low. How is this not clear?
    It's one of many possible symptoms.

    Read up.
    I believe his point is that Apple won't say "You have COVID-19" simply because you have a symptom of COVID-19. That's a post hoc fallacy. Because of this, therefore that. It would simply tell you what symptom you have. It's like saying "You've fallen from a ladder" when the Watch detects a fall instead of saying it detects a fall. Sure, being up high on a ladder can lead to a fall, but there are countless other reasons. It's the problem with people using WebMD to self-diagnose based on a minimal symptom recognition.
    Um... That's basically what I am saying. The use of word "possible" obviates any post-hoc fallacy, apart from which well-known science on blood oxygen levels renders your (and the OP's) point moot.

    Did you reply to the wrong person?
    "Possible" is just as bad in this situation, and even worse when you only select COVID-19 as the possibility amongst a practically countless number of health issues. To reiterate, it should only diagnose that your blood oxygen saturation appears low, not a small or countless list of illnesses that it could be. That's irresponsible and dangerous.
    fastasleep
  • Reply 108 of 160

    Beats said:
    “You are showing symptoms of Covid-19.” is a diagnosis. It could literally be any other reason their O2 levels are low. How is this not clear?
    I still don't get how that's a diagnosis but maybe it's some word gymnastics. It's no more a diagnosis than the afib feature.

    I think the reason for the confusion here is that there is a difference of opinion whether the statement "A is a symptom of B" implies that it sounds like you are being told you might have B. Some people would say it does imply that, and you think it doesn't imply that. Your point of view is one valid point of view, but so is the other point of view. Since there are some people who think it does imply a connection between the test and your specific health, the government doesn't want those people to be misled so they prohibit that kind of statement.

    Furthermore, the AFIB feature was actually APPROVED by federal authorities as an approved diagnostic tool for AFIB. In Canada I had to wait until July 2019 before I would buy Apple Watch Series 5 because Apple couldn't enable the ECG feature or AFIB detection in Series 5 for any customers in Canada until the government of Canada approved its hardware for its purpose. There could still be countries in the world where Apple can't enable its ECG/AFIB features in Series 5.

    ...
    The medical industry already answered that question:   Only a physician can diagnose.   A nurse can report that the patient has an SpO2 of, say, "86", a dry cough and a temperature of 102 degrees but those are just a data points that could be created by a number of diseases or conditions.   It's data, not a diagnosis.  A diagnosis in the medical field points to a specific disease or condition such as pneumonia, heart failure, COPD or covid.

    Even with the AFib feature Apple is careful to tell people to report it to physician.   No physician would diagnose AFib from a single reading from a watch.   In addition, they would run a number of other tests to rule out other conditions.

    fastasleep
  • Reply 109 of 160
    razorpit said:
    dewme said:
    dewme said:
    My Apple Watch 5 is less than a year old and I'm tempted to upgrade to get the blood oxygen sensor.

    Question: The article above mentions "sleep apnea" but the demonstrations of the oxygen sensor shown in the video today make the oxygen sensing feature look like an interactive process. This alone wouldn't really do much for sleep apnea sufferers because the greatest threat occurs when they are asleep. To be truly effective for sleep apnea detection the oxygen measurement should take place periodically and whenever the device detects the user has suddenly stopped breathing, is snoring, or is gasping for air. I didn't see anything in the video that talked about how this new sensor would potentially be employed for sleep apnea detection and monitoring.

    Like everything else health related on the Apple Watch, it is not a substitute for the advanced diagnostics that are performed in a clinical setting under the care of a doctor or medical professionals. But it is a tool that can be used to alert you to a potential issue that requires further attention by a medical professional. I'm wondering how this model applies to the detection and treatment of sleep apnea used in conjunction with the Apple Watch 6.
    Watch it again. They said it would take background readings throughout the day. 

    I’m upgrading from my 3 partially because I’m curious about sleep apnea. I just haven’t been able to figure if I want the new silicone loop or just the original sport band. 
    Thanks. That is good news. I keyed in on the on-demand part with the countdown timer on the video and missed the background sampling part.  

    I now see on the Apple.com website: "The remarkable new sensor and app in Apple Watch Series 6 allow you to take on-demand readings of your blood oxygen as well as background readings, day and night." That is a big deal.

    Background readings are vital. Triggering background readings when an "event" occurs would be very important as well, but we won't really know what the watch can until we see this feature in action in the real world. I'm sure Apple tested it, but I'm also sure that Apple does not want to overstate its capabilities or set expectations too high. Some other health monitor band/watch companies have made claims about sleep apnea detection using other sensors, like pulse rate, but these claims don't seem to result in product features, which I suppose due to liability concerns. Apple is very very careful about making any health related claims.

    Regarding at-home CPAP machines - the ones I've used do have a SIM card and, at times, a modem and telemetry, but the only thing they are recording is usage and pressure. It's mainly there to verify that you are using the machine. They don't have any other sensors. The reason ongoing oxygen monitoring is needed is because the pressure on the machine may have to be adjusted periodically, i.e., it may no longer be helping you. Getting everything set correctly requires an overnight sleep study, and these can cost thousands of dollars to administer. If the AW6 can tell you you may need a study it will serve a very important purpose.

    I agree with the value and benefit of event triggered monitoring -- such as regular or even continuous monitoring during aerobic activity -- especially during periods of elevated heart rate.    During a tempo run my heart rate can run well over 90% of its Max and knowing how my SpO2 levels did would be great information.
    ...  But, as you say, we don't know enough right now.  We'll have to wait for some hands-on testing to know if and how this works.

    As for CPAP machines and sleep:  I am hoping that eventually Apple can replace the need for most sleep studies which, unless you're having a known and significant problem seem pretty sketchy to me -- mostly self proclaimed experts who little about their specialty but who make lots of money selling their snake oil.   Before I trusted one of them I would want to loaded up with facts on what exactly was going on with my body.   As for them monitoring the CPAP machine, please remember that the healthcare industry cares nothing about your health and only about its profits.
    Everything is sketchy to you. CPAP machines work. Sleep studies are done so that they can diagnose your condition and treat it correctly. Type of treatment (machine, surgery) and settings are determined after a sleep study. Can an AppleWatch replace a sleep study? Not yet, but it can provide a lot of useful data to your doctor if everyone was on the same page. I was really hoping for a body temperature setting. That is needed for accurate sleep analysis.

    And by the way as soon as you apply your “they don’t care about you” philosophy to BOTH political parties, you’ll be truly woke.

    LOL.... If you think the healthcare industry cares more about your health than their profits you're probably gullible enough to actually believe anything DonTheCon says too!
  • Reply 110 of 160
    Xed said:
    Xed said:

    Beats said:
    Beats said:
    Beats said:
    They briefly mentioned Covid-19. How accurate is this for DETECTING a new infection in users? I'm guessing they would have drove that point home if it were accurate.
    Low blood oxygen isn’t only related to COVID-19, they started on this feature long before that was even a thing. Not to mention FDA regulations, you can’t “detect” a virus based on a singular symptom.

    I figured. Just thought Tim Cook would go overdrive on engineering to get it on the market ASAP.

    The FDA would definitely hate any "detection" but I thought they could alert you on the possibility like a notification saying "You are showing symptoms of Covid-19. Tap here for details and recommended measures to take" To avoid violating laws.
    That statement would be illegal. You cannot allow people to self diagnose disease with consumer electronics. Not sure how else to explain this. 

    How is that a diagnosis?
    “You are showing symptoms of Covid-19.” is a diagnosis. It could literally be any other reason their O2 levels are low. How is this not clear?
    It's one of many possible symptoms.

    Read up.
    I believe his point is that Apple won't say "You have COVID-19" simply because you have a symptom of COVID-19. That's a post hoc fallacy. Because of this, therefore that. It would simply tell you what symptom you have. It's like saying "You've fallen from a ladder" when the Watch detects a fall instead of saying it detects a fall. Sure, being up high on a ladder can lead to a fall, but there are countless other reasons. It's the problem with people using WebMD to self-diagnose based on a minimal symptom recognition.
    Um... That's basically what I am saying. The use of word "possible" obviates any post-hoc fallacy, apart from which well-known science on blood oxygen levels renders your (and the OP's) point moot.

    Did you reply to the wrong person?
    "Possible" is just as bad in this situation, and even worse when you only select COVID-19 as the possibility amongst a practically countless number of health issues. To reiterate, it should only diagnose that your blood oxygen saturation appears low, not a small or countless list of illnesses that it could be. That's irresponsible and dangerous.
    That's all it does. I don't get your point.
  • Reply 111 of 160

    razorpit said:
    dewme said:
    dewme said:
    My Apple Watch 5 is less than a year old and I'm tempted to upgrade to get the blood oxygen sensor.

    Question: The article above mentions "sleep apnea" but the demonstrations of the oxygen sensor shown in the video today make the oxygen sensing feature look like an interactive process. This alone wouldn't really do much for sleep apnea sufferers because the greatest threat occurs when they are asleep. To be truly effective for sleep apnea detection the oxygen measurement should take place periodically and whenever the device detects the user has suddenly stopped breathing, is snoring, or is gasping for air. I didn't see anything in the video that talked about how this new sensor would potentially be employed for sleep apnea detection and monitoring.

    Like everything else health related on the Apple Watch, it is not a substitute for the advanced diagnostics that are performed in a clinical setting under the care of a doctor or medical professionals. But it is a tool that can be used to alert you to a potential issue that requires further attention by a medical professional. I'm wondering how this model applies to the detection and treatment of sleep apnea used in conjunction with the Apple Watch 6.
    Watch it again. They said it would take background readings throughout the day. 

    I’m upgrading from my 3 partially because I’m curious about sleep apnea. I just haven’t been able to figure if I want the new silicone loop or just the original sport band. 
    Thanks. That is good news. I keyed in on the on-demand part with the countdown timer on the video and missed the background sampling part.  

    I now see on the Apple.com website: "The remarkable new sensor and app in Apple Watch Series 6 allow you to take on-demand readings of your blood oxygen as well as background readings, day and night." That is a big deal.

    Background readings are vital. Triggering background readings when an "event" occurs would be very important as well, but we won't really know what the watch can until we see this feature in action in the real world. I'm sure Apple tested it, but I'm also sure that Apple does not want to overstate its capabilities or set expectations too high. Some other health monitor band/watch companies have made claims about sleep apnea detection using other sensors, like pulse rate, but these claims don't seem to result in product features, which I suppose due to liability concerns. Apple is very very careful about making any health related claims.

    Regarding at-home CPAP machines - the ones I've used do have a SIM card and, at times, a modem and telemetry, but the only thing they are recording is usage and pressure. It's mainly there to verify that you are using the machine. They don't have any other sensors. The reason ongoing oxygen monitoring is needed is because the pressure on the machine may have to be adjusted periodically, i.e., it may no longer be helping you. Getting everything set correctly requires an overnight sleep study, and these can cost thousands of dollars to administer. If the AW6 can tell you you may need a study it will serve a very important purpose.

    I agree with the value and benefit of event triggered monitoring -- such as regular or even continuous monitoring during aerobic activity -- especially during periods of elevated heart rate.    During a tempo run my heart rate can run well over 90% of its Max and knowing how my SpO2 levels did would be great information.
    ...  But, as you say, we don't know enough right now.  We'll have to wait for some hands-on testing to know if and how this works.

    As for CPAP machines and sleep:  I am hoping that eventually Apple can replace the need for most sleep studies which, unless you're having a known and significant problem seem pretty sketchy to me -- mostly self proclaimed experts who little about their specialty but who make lots of money selling their snake oil.   Before I trusted one of them I would want to loaded up with facts on what exactly was going on with my body.   As for them monitoring the CPAP machine, please remember that the healthcare industry cares nothing about your health and only about its profits.
    Everything is sketchy to you. CPAP machines work. Sleep studies are done so that they can diagnose your condition and treat it correctly. Type of treatment (machine, surgery) and settings are determined after a sleep study. Can an AppleWatch replace a sleep study? Not yet, but it can provide a lot of useful data to your doctor if everyone was on the same page. I was really hoping for a body temperature setting. That is needed for accurate sleep analysis.

    And by the way as soon as you apply your “they don’t care about you” philosophy to BOTH political parties, you’ll be truly woke.

    LOL.... If you think the healthcare industry cares more about your health than their profits you're probably gullible enough to actually believe anything DonTheCon says too!
    LOL, if you don't understand that the profit motive of the health care industry is what helps keep us healthy you're probably gullible enough to ...  [fill in the blanks]
    razorpitGG1SpamSandwich
  • Reply 112 of 160
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,508member
    zimmie said:
    dtidmore said:
    The black SS DLC is STILL available, but they have made it exclusive the Hermes edition.  The cheapest version is now just pennies under $1300.  I have purchased the black SS every year since series 0 and was really bummed by the move.  I debated not messing with the Series 6 but decided to try the space black titanium case as it should still match my original series 0 black stainless link band and all the other bands that I have collected over these years.
    On the Apple Watch comparison page, they say the stainless steel "graphite" finish is diamond-like carbon. I would look at it in person. Might just be a new name, or it might be a slightly different color. The space black steel watch never quite matched the finish on the black link bracelet, but it was always close enough not to matter too much.
    I didn’t see that. Good to know since I ordered the graphite version. Yeah, the space black models are a very high gloss, while the bracelet is a brushed finish that looks like a very dark grey in comparison. Though, by itself looks totally black.
  • Reply 113 of 160
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,508member

    chasm said:
    My standalone pulse oximeter takes only 5 seconds to get a reading, while Apple's takes 30 seconds. Although I wouldn't have to manually enter my SpO2 reading into the iOS health app each time I take a reading. Still, 30 seconds is a disappointment. I'm not an Apple hater, I'm allowed to point out negatives like this however.

    I suspect Apple has erred on the side of better accuracy and caution, since these days a bad reading can send people straight to the hospital screaming they have COVID.

    I thought they said the reading took 15 seconds but I could well be misremembering. Also, I daresay your standalone unit is just a bit bigger than an Apple Watch. :)
    Dang, 15 seconds was right. So sorry. Do I need to go win a Darwin Award for being wrong once in my life? I guess I was so used to the 30 second ECG feature that that's why I was wrong.
    You’ve been wrong just once in your life, and it’s about something minor like that? You are a very luck person indeed.
  • Reply 114 of 160
    dr. x said:
    iOS_Guy80 said:
    I am getting it no matter what (part of the every-other-year cycle). But I really wanted a battery life metric. Also, WTF was the lady talking about with “no power adapter”?
    Rumor has it that there will be no charging adaptor in the new iPhones, so possibly no charging adaptor in the Watch Series 6, if so they still would have to include (I assume) the charging “puck”.

    Yes, the charging puck is still included but no power adapter. I guess that's a good thing for those who always own an Apple product but what if it's a new customer and they receive the device and they can't charge it? 
    If they already own an iPhone they already have at least one charger; and if they're a typical they have more USB ports and chargers than they care to think about. They'll live. 
    fastasleep
  • Reply 115 of 160

    johnbear said:
    johnbear said:
    Too bad they still use that ugly baby toy design. But I guess it’s targeted towards elderly as a survival device so it can look like crap 
    What must life be like, being so sour? Buy a Samsung hockey puck then, if that's what you're interested in. Why bother us about it?
    I have several apple devices but I can’t stand the stupid design of the watch. My opinion. And I’m sorry you and many other on this forum don’t have any taste;)
    We do have taste. You've just confused your personal, subjective opinion, as something more important than it is. You may as well be whining about your favorite ice cream flavor... Your subjective opinion on watch design just isn't important to anyone other than you and possible your mother.
    fastasleepjdb8167melgross
  • Reply 116 of 160

    It’s a dull evolution on the Series 5. Which is fine, but I was hoping for a slightly flatter, less bulky & more contemporary feel to it. 
    How do you people not understand that incremental improvement is how Apple rolls, after all these years? Literally decades. Gruber documented it over 10 years ago...big product, then refine, refine, refine. Add up enough years of refinement and you have a nice upgrade. Normal people don't upgrade every year...

    https://www.macworld.com/article/1151235/apple-rolls.html
    fastasleepjdb8167
  • Reply 117 of 160

    razorpit said:
    dewme said:
    dewme said:
    My Apple Watch 5 is less than a year old and I'm tempted to upgrade to get the blood oxygen sensor.

    Question: The article above mentions "sleep apnea" but the demonstrations of the oxygen sensor shown in the video today make the oxygen sensing feature look like an interactive process. This alone wouldn't really do much for sleep apnea sufferers because the greatest threat occurs when they are asleep. To be truly effective for sleep apnea detection the oxygen measurement should take place periodically and whenever the device detects the user has suddenly stopped breathing, is snoring, or is gasping for air. I didn't see anything in the video that talked about how this new sensor would potentially be employed for sleep apnea detection and monitoring.

    Like everything else health related on the Apple Watch, it is not a substitute for the advanced diagnostics that are performed in a clinical setting under the care of a doctor or medical professionals. But it is a tool that can be used to alert you to a potential issue that requires further attention by a medical professional. I'm wondering how this model applies to the detection and treatment of sleep apnea used in conjunction with the Apple Watch 6.
    Watch it again. They said it would take background readings throughout the day. 

    I’m upgrading from my 3 partially because I’m curious about sleep apnea. I just haven’t been able to figure if I want the new silicone loop or just the original sport band. 
    Thanks. That is good news. I keyed in on the on-demand part with the countdown timer on the video and missed the background sampling part.  

    I now see on the Apple.com website: "The remarkable new sensor and app in Apple Watch Series 6 allow you to take on-demand readings of your blood oxygen as well as background readings, day and night." That is a big deal.

    Background readings are vital. Triggering background readings when an "event" occurs would be very important as well, but we won't really know what the watch can until we see this feature in action in the real world. I'm sure Apple tested it, but I'm also sure that Apple does not want to overstate its capabilities or set expectations too high. Some other health monitor band/watch companies have made claims about sleep apnea detection using other sensors, like pulse rate, but these claims don't seem to result in product features, which I suppose due to liability concerns. Apple is very very careful about making any health related claims.

    Regarding at-home CPAP machines - the ones I've used do have a SIM card and, at times, a modem and telemetry, but the only thing they are recording is usage and pressure. It's mainly there to verify that you are using the machine. They don't have any other sensors. The reason ongoing oxygen monitoring is needed is because the pressure on the machine may have to be adjusted periodically, i.e., it may no longer be helping you. Getting everything set correctly requires an overnight sleep study, and these can cost thousands of dollars to administer. If the AW6 can tell you you may need a study it will serve a very important purpose.

    I agree with the value and benefit of event triggered monitoring -- such as regular or even continuous monitoring during aerobic activity -- especially during periods of elevated heart rate.    During a tempo run my heart rate can run well over 90% of its Max and knowing how my SpO2 levels did would be great information.
    ...  But, as you say, we don't know enough right now.  We'll have to wait for some hands-on testing to know if and how this works.

    As for CPAP machines and sleep:  I am hoping that eventually Apple can replace the need for most sleep studies which, unless you're having a known and significant problem seem pretty sketchy to me -- mostly self proclaimed experts who little about their specialty but who make lots of money selling their snake oil.   Before I trusted one of them I would want to loaded up with facts on what exactly was going on with my body.   As for them monitoring the CPAP machine, please remember that the healthcare industry cares nothing about your health and only about its profits.
    Everything is sketchy to you. CPAP machines work. Sleep studies are done so that they can diagnose your condition and treat it correctly. Type of treatment (machine, surgery) and settings are determined after a sleep study. Can an AppleWatch replace a sleep study? Not yet, but it can provide a lot of useful data to your doctor if everyone was on the same page. I was really hoping for a body temperature setting. That is needed for accurate sleep analysis.

    And by the way as soon as you apply your “they don’t care about you” philosophy to BOTH political parties, you’ll be truly woke.

    LOL.... If you think the healthcare industry cares more about your health than their profits you're probably gullible enough to actually believe anything DonTheCon says too!
    LOL, if you don't understand that the profit motive of the health care industry is what helps keep us healthy you're probably gullible enough to ...  [fill in the blanks]
    What nonsense. The healthcare billionaires make their money treating symptoms. US healthcare is not best in class, we spend more and get less; we have have worse morbidity than much of the west, and it's largely because of the profit-based model of hospitals and insurance companies. Treatment decisions aren't made between patient and doctor, they're made by insurance companies. That's nuts.

    https://www.commonwealthfund.org/publications/issue-briefs/2020/jan/us-health-care-global-perspective-2019
  • Reply 118 of 160
    dewmedewme Posts: 5,261member
    razorpit said:
    dewme said:
    dewme said:
    My Apple Watch 5 is less than a year old and I'm tempted to upgrade to get the blood oxygen sensor.

    Question: The article above mentions "sleep apnea" but the demonstrations of the oxygen sensor shown in the video today make the oxygen sensing feature look like an interactive process. This alone wouldn't really do much for sleep apnea sufferers because the greatest threat occurs when they are asleep. To be truly effective for sleep apnea detection the oxygen measurement should take place periodically and whenever the device detects the user has suddenly stopped breathing, is snoring, or is gasping for air. I didn't see anything in the video that talked about how this new sensor would potentially be employed for sleep apnea detection and monitoring.

    Like everything else health related on the Apple Watch, it is not a substitute for the advanced diagnostics that are performed in a clinical setting under the care of a doctor or medical professionals. But it is a tool that can be used to alert you to a potential issue that requires further attention by a medical professional. I'm wondering how this model applies to the detection and treatment of sleep apnea used in conjunction with the Apple Watch 6.
    Watch it again. They said it would take background readings throughout the day. 

    I’m upgrading from my 3 partially because I’m curious about sleep apnea. I just haven’t been able to figure if I want the new silicone loop or just the original sport band. 
    Thanks. That is good news. I keyed in on the on-demand part with the countdown timer on the video and missed the background sampling part.  

    I now see on the Apple.com website: "The remarkable new sensor and app in Apple Watch Series 6 allow you to take on-demand readings of your blood oxygen as well as background readings, day and night." That is a big deal.

    Background readings are vital. Triggering background readings when an "event" occurs would be very important as well, but we won't really know what the watch can until we see this feature in action in the real world. I'm sure Apple tested it, but I'm also sure that Apple does not want to overstate its capabilities or set expectations too high. Some other health monitor band/watch companies have made claims about sleep apnea detection using other sensors, like pulse rate, but these claims don't seem to result in product features, which I suppose due to liability concerns. Apple is very very careful about making any health related claims.

    Regarding at-home CPAP machines - the ones I've used do have a SIM card and, at times, a modem and telemetry, but the only thing they are recording is usage and pressure. It's mainly there to verify that you are using the machine. They don't have any other sensors. The reason ongoing oxygen monitoring is needed is because the pressure on the machine may have to be adjusted periodically, i.e., it may no longer be helping you. Getting everything set correctly requires an overnight sleep study, and these can cost thousands of dollars to administer. If the AW6 can tell you you may need a study it will serve a very important purpose.

    I agree with the value and benefit of event triggered monitoring -- such as regular or even continuous monitoring during aerobic activity -- especially during periods of elevated heart rate.    During a tempo run my heart rate can run well over 90% of its Max and knowing how my SpO2 levels did would be great information.
    ...  But, as you say, we don't know enough right now.  We'll have to wait for some hands-on testing to know if and how this works.

    As for CPAP machines and sleep:  I am hoping that eventually Apple can replace the need for most sleep studies which, unless you're having a known and significant problem seem pretty sketchy to me -- mostly self proclaimed experts who little about their specialty but who make lots of money selling their snake oil.   Before I trusted one of them I would want to loaded up with facts on what exactly was going on with my body.   As for them monitoring the CPAP machine, please remember that the healthcare industry cares nothing about your health and only about its profits.
    Everything is sketchy to you. CPAP machines work. Sleep studies are done so that they can diagnose your condition and treat it correctly. Type of treatment (machine, surgery) and settings are determined after a sleep study. Can an AppleWatch replace a sleep study? Not yet, but it can provide a lot of useful data to your doctor if everyone was on the same page. I was really hoping for a body temperature setting. That is needed for accurate sleep analysis.

    And by the way as soon as you apply your “they don’t care about you” philosophy to BOTH political parties, you’ll be truly woke.
    I totally agree that CPAPs work. I've had 4 sleep studies done in the past 8 years at one of the best, in the top 3, ranked hospital systems in the US. They are obviously much more intensive and gather much more data than anything you could hope to obtain from a smart watch, like continuous EEG monitoring, continuous blood oxygen monitoring, multi-sensor data logging, and correlation of data from 25+ sensors attached to various parts of your body.

    The complexity and expense of a sleep study is what makes the Apple Watch sleep health related features so exciting to me, not because I expect it to replace a sleep study, but rather to give me some indication that a sleep study may be necessary. The biggest problem I have with sleep studies is that once you are all wired up, looking like Medusa  with a cumbersome mess of wires stuck all over your head, face, and other parts of your body, and sleeping in an instrumented room with cameras pointing at you and machines running all around you, possibly strapped to a CPAP, you are not going to have anything remotely resembling a normal night's sleep. It's very off-putting and disruptive to your normal sleep situation so no matter the outcome you're always left with a feeling that the sleep study, with you as the lab rat, isn't representative of what you experience at home. When it's over you just want to go home and go to bed.

    On the other hand, the data doesn't lie, so if it tells you you're waking up dozens of times per night, not breathing for extended periods, or having your blood oxygen levels plummet into the 80s, 70s or even 60s, you have to do something about it because the lack of oxygen will absolutely kill major organs in your body and slowly fry your brain. If the Apple Watch can provide an early warning indicator that you MAY have a problem that requires further attention by a medical professional, it can help put you on a path to improve your quality of life, and may even help save your life. The fact that it can provide early detection when you are in your normal living and sleeping situation, when you think everything is cool, and not just when you're the lab rat in a disruptive experiment, would be a real game changer.  
    GG1SpamSandwichfastasleep
  • Reply 119 of 160

    razorpit said:
    dewme said:
    dewme said:
    My Apple Watch 5 is less than a year old and I'm tempted to upgrade to get the blood oxygen sensor.

    Question: The article above mentions "sleep apnea" but the demonstrations of the oxygen sensor shown in the video today make the oxygen sensing feature look like an interactive process. This alone wouldn't really do much for sleep apnea sufferers because the greatest threat occurs when they are asleep. To be truly effective for sleep apnea detection the oxygen measurement should take place periodically and whenever the device detects the user has suddenly stopped breathing, is snoring, or is gasping for air. I didn't see anything in the video that talked about how this new sensor would potentially be employed for sleep apnea detection and monitoring.

    Like everything else health related on the Apple Watch, it is not a substitute for the advanced diagnostics that are performed in a clinical setting under the care of a doctor or medical professionals. But it is a tool that can be used to alert you to a potential issue that requires further attention by a medical professional. I'm wondering how this model applies to the detection and treatment of sleep apnea used in conjunction with the Apple Watch 6.
    Watch it again. They said it would take background readings throughout the day. 

    I’m upgrading from my 3 partially because I’m curious about sleep apnea. I just haven’t been able to figure if I want the new silicone loop or just the original sport band. 
    Thanks. That is good news. I keyed in on the on-demand part with the countdown timer on the video and missed the background sampling part.  

    I now see on the Apple.com website: "The remarkable new sensor and app in Apple Watch Series 6 allow you to take on-demand readings of your blood oxygen as well as background readings, day and night." That is a big deal.

    Background readings are vital. Triggering background readings when an "event" occurs would be very important as well, but we won't really know what the watch can until we see this feature in action in the real world. I'm sure Apple tested it, but I'm also sure that Apple does not want to overstate its capabilities or set expectations too high. Some other health monitor band/watch companies have made claims about sleep apnea detection using other sensors, like pulse rate, but these claims don't seem to result in product features, which I suppose due to liability concerns. Apple is very very careful about making any health related claims.

    Regarding at-home CPAP machines - the ones I've used do have a SIM card and, at times, a modem and telemetry, but the only thing they are recording is usage and pressure. It's mainly there to verify that you are using the machine. They don't have any other sensors. The reason ongoing oxygen monitoring is needed is because the pressure on the machine may have to be adjusted periodically, i.e., it may no longer be helping you. Getting everything set correctly requires an overnight sleep study, and these can cost thousands of dollars to administer. If the AW6 can tell you you may need a study it will serve a very important purpose.

    I agree with the value and benefit of event triggered monitoring -- such as regular or even continuous monitoring during aerobic activity -- especially during periods of elevated heart rate.    During a tempo run my heart rate can run well over 90% of its Max and knowing how my SpO2 levels did would be great information.
    ...  But, as you say, we don't know enough right now.  We'll have to wait for some hands-on testing to know if and how this works.

    As for CPAP machines and sleep:  I am hoping that eventually Apple can replace the need for most sleep studies which, unless you're having a known and significant problem seem pretty sketchy to me -- mostly self proclaimed experts who little about their specialty but who make lots of money selling their snake oil.   Before I trusted one of them I would want to loaded up with facts on what exactly was going on with my body.   As for them monitoring the CPAP machine, please remember that the healthcare industry cares nothing about your health and only about its profits.
    Everything is sketchy to you. CPAP machines work. Sleep studies are done so that they can diagnose your condition and treat it correctly. Type of treatment (machine, surgery) and settings are determined after a sleep study. Can an AppleWatch replace a sleep study? Not yet, but it can provide a lot of useful data to your doctor if everyone was on the same page. I was really hoping for a body temperature setting. That is needed for accurate sleep analysis.

    And by the way as soon as you apply your “they don’t care about you” philosophy to BOTH political parties, you’ll be truly woke.

    LOL.... If you think the healthcare industry cares more about your health than their profits you're probably gullible enough to actually believe anything DonTheCon says too!
    LOL, if you don't understand that the profit motive of the health care industry is what helps keep us healthy you're probably gullible enough to ...  [fill in the blanks]

    That "for-profit-only' health care system is, at best, VERY mediocre in comparison to those dreaded, horrible "Socialist" healthcare systems you Trumpers whine about.  We pay several times more to get worse care -- IF you can get it at all -- and you Trumpers BRAG about it!   So, who is the gullible one here? 
  • Reply 120 of 160
    XedXed Posts: 2,461member
    Xed said:
    Xed said:

    Beats said:
    Beats said:
    Beats said:
    They briefly mentioned Covid-19. How accurate is this for DETECTING a new infection in users? I'm guessing they would have drove that point home if it were accurate.
    Low blood oxygen isn’t only related to COVID-19, they started on this feature long before that was even a thing. Not to mention FDA regulations, you can’t “detect” a virus based on a singular symptom.

    I figured. Just thought Tim Cook would go overdrive on engineering to get it on the market ASAP.

    The FDA would definitely hate any "detection" but I thought they could alert you on the possibility like a notification saying "You are showing symptoms of Covid-19. Tap here for details and recommended measures to take" To avoid violating laws.
    That statement would be illegal. You cannot allow people to self diagnose disease with consumer electronics. Not sure how else to explain this. 

    How is that a diagnosis?
    “You are showing symptoms of Covid-19.” is a diagnosis. It could literally be any other reason their O2 levels are low. How is this not clear?
    It's one of many possible symptoms.

    Read up.
    I believe his point is that Apple won't say "You have COVID-19" simply because you have a symptom of COVID-19. That's a post hoc fallacy. Because of this, therefore that. It would simply tell you what symptom you have. It's like saying "You've fallen from a ladder" when the Watch detects a fall instead of saying it detects a fall. Sure, being up high on a ladder can lead to a fall, but there are countless other reasons. It's the problem with people using WebMD to self-diagnose based on a minimal symptom recognition.
    Um... That's basically what I am saying. The use of word "possible" obviates any post-hoc fallacy, apart from which well-known science on blood oxygen levels renders your (and the OP's) point moot.

    Did you reply to the wrong person?
    "Possible" is just as bad in this situation, and even worse when you only select COVID-19 as the possibility amongst a practically countless number of health issues. To reiterate, it should only diagnose that your blood oxygen saturation appears low, not a small or countless list of illnesses that it could be. That's irresponsible and dangerous.
    That's all it does. I don't get your point.
    Because saying you're possibly having a very specific illness because of a single symptom is an irresponsible and dangerous. Do you really think it's reasonable for a watch to say "You possibly have AIDS" or "You possibly have stage 4  lung cancer" simply because it detects your blood oxygen level is too low? I don't, and yet by your argument those things could possibly be true as those are possible symptoms for hyopxia. How about we have the Watch only state things it's sure of.
    fastasleep
Sign In or Register to comment.