'Fortnite' not coming back to iOS or Mac any time soon

Posted:
in iPhone edited September 22
Apple will not restore Epic Games' App Store developer account that it used for "Fortnite," until all of the appeals for the trial have been exhausted -- which will take years.

Credit: Epic Games
Credit: Epic Games


Epic Games CEO Tim Sweeney said on Wednesday that Apple had decided to exercise its right to exclude the company from the App Store. Apple lawyer Mark Perry informed Epic's counsel Gary Bornstein of the decision "late" Tuesday, according to Sweeney.

Additionally, Perry's letter to Epic Games indicated that Apple would not consider any further reinstatement requests until "the district court's judgement becomes final and nonappealable." Sweeney says that process could be as long as five years.

The decision comes after Epic Games submitted a request to Apple to have its developer account reinstated. Apple said it would welcome Epic Games -- and "Fortnite" -- back to the App Store if it played by the same rules as everyone else.

In Apple's message back to Epic Games, the Cupertino tech giant said that the decision was based on the court ruling that Epic Games had intentionally breached its contract and other past "duplicitous conduct."

"Apple lied. Apple spent a year telling the world, the court, and the press they'd 'welcome Epic's return to the App Store if they agree to play by the same rules as everyone else,'" Sweeney wrote. "Epic agreed, and now Apple has reneged in another abuse of its monopoly power over a billion users."

The district court's ruling in the Epic Games v. Apple case came on Sept 10. It decided that Apple was not a monopoly, but that its guidelines prohibiting developers from advertising cheaper in-app purchase prices was anticompetitive. As such, the court gave Apple 90 days to do away with that policy and allow developers to add links or buttons to third-party payment platforms.

The court also decided that Epic Games had breached its contract by sneaking a direct payment platform -- in violation of Apple's guidelines -- in a "Fortnite." That breach of contract is why Apple can retain the ban on Epic's developer account. The court also ordered Epic Games to pay back about 30% of the money it made from the direct payment system.

Apple called the ruling a victory. Epic Games was less happy, and filed to appeal the decision on Sept. 12.

Read on AppleInsider
jahbladen2itivguy
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 44
    Where do things stand for the unreal engine? 


    darelrexwatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 44
    crowleycrowley Posts: 8,906member
    Good, it's trash.
    darelrexfotoformatpscooter63igorskyjahbladebloggerblogkillroywatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 3 of 44
    How much money does Epic stand to lose over 5 years? 
    williamlondonpscooter63jahbladekillroywatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 44
    crowleycrowley Posts: 8,906member
    I would assume you can get it on the Mac via the Epic Game Store though?  It's been withdrawn from the Mac App Store, not the Mac.
    darelrexOctoMonkeygeekmeewatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 44
    This effing weasel Sweeney has some pair on him, I’ll give him that. 
    williamlondonmartinp13pulseimageskillroyArszyDBSyncwatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 44
    If thing are as reported, I'd say it is a half measure from Apple.

    Apple could play nice and accept Epic again in the App Store, assuming they don't repeat any shenanigans—and stop bitching in social media. Or Apple could nuke their ass by banning all Epic developer accounts (e.g. Unreal Engine) which is allowed to do now, if I've read the verdict correctly.

    This "so so" approach only gives air to Epic's fiery comments about being mistreated, at the same time that it don't do enough to really hurt them.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 44
    Why do these appeal options even exist for cases that don't have any new evidence/data? A ruling was made, abide by it and move on.
    jas99pichaelgeekmeewatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 8 of 44
    Good. Epic get what they deserve. 
    williamlondonArszyDBSyncwatto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 44
    Would Epic be willing to put money in escrow until things get resolved?  As was offered at the beginning of this whole ordeal???  I don’t think so.  
    hammeroftruthwatto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 44
    So Epic continue with a bad attitude and keep bad mouthing Apple and wonder why Apple won’t let them back in?

    Maybe if Epic retract all the bad things they have said, maybe if they publically state that they were wrong and Apple were right all along, maybe if Epic admit that what they did was childish and a breach of contract, maybe if they apologise to Apple in the newspapers, maybe if they state that they will abide by the same rules as others and not pursue any appeals or attempt to bring new court cases. Maybe then Apple should consider letting them back in. Maybe.

    DBSyncwatto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 44
    Why do these appeal options even exist for cases that don't have any new evidence/data? A ruling was made, abide by it and move on.
    Because the purpose of an appeals court is to review how the law was applied to the facts in evidence. Not to gather new evidence.
    muthuk_vanalingamlarryjwmartinp13pscooter63jahbladebloggerblogHedwarejony0
  • Reply 12 of 44
    Good, now let Epic's self-induced melodrama continue its "woe is me" whine. Perhaps more people will begin to see Epic for what it is, a company run by a lying self-entitled, megalomaniacal greedy SOB who is only interested in enriching himself and actually wants nothing for its customers or other developers.

    I wonder what Epic's board thinks of Sweeney's performance now, maybe a boot in the ass and hard shove out the door is warranted?
    igorskyretrogustojahbladeDBSyncwatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 13 of 44
    Why do these appeal options even exist for cases that don't have any new evidence/data? A ruling was made, abide by it and move on.
    Because the purpose of an appeals court is to review how the law was applied to the facts in evidence. Not to gather new evidence.
    That's good, because from what I've read there are plenty of legal doubts as to whether the judge applied the law correctly in the one count Apple lost.
    retrogustowilliamlondonMacProwatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 14 of 44
    jungmarkjungmark Posts: 6,878member
    “Wah” - Epic.

    You made your bed, now sleep in it. Follow the rules. 
    williamlondonArszypscooter63watto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 15 of 44
    How much money does Epic stand to lose over 5 years? 
    By my back of the envelope math somewhere in the neighborhood of $1.75 billion dollars. During the trial it came out that Epic makes about $5 billion a year in revenue from Fortnite and that iOS accounted for 7% of that revenue. Seven percent of $5 billion would be about $350 million, times 5 years and you get $1.75 billion dollars. 
    edited September 22 williamlondonbakerzdosenn2itivguyviclauyyckillroymikeybabesmwhitepscooter63DBSyncwatto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 44
    Hopefully Apple will have developed something better than Unreal Engine by then. Icing on the cake. 


    n2itivguyArszywatto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 44
    Why do these appeal options even exist for cases that don't have any new evidence/data? A ruling was made, abide by it and move on.

    yeah, not how the system works. but thanks for playing along...
  • Reply 18 of 44
    DAalsethDAalseth Posts: 1,776member
    I’m LMAO. So Apple won’t let them back in because EPIC is appealing. The delay is all EPIC’s fault. OMG they shot themselves in the foot, and decided to reload. 
    williamlondonn2itivguyMplsPblastdoorkillroyArszybaederboypscooter63sconosciutodewme
  • Reply 19 of 44
    Sweeney is conveniently omitting the key difference between then and now. Back then, when Apple said Epic was welcome back, it would have been under the terms of the previous contract. 

    Now, however, Epic wants to have its cake and eat it too. It wants back onto the iOS App Store with the app that it broke the previous contract with.

    The court explicitly told Apple it doesn’t have to do that, ever, so Epic should probably be pleased Apple says they will allow them to come back when the appeal is exhausted, which is better than, you know, never.

    It’s also worth noting that Apple will be able to work out the details of how to implement the ruling without Epic’s meddling, at least not directly. Instead, Epic’s (i.e., Unreal Engine’s) customers will be the ones working with Apple to figure this out. 
    edited September 22 watto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 44
    One one level, I'm happy about it. I'd rather my kid not play Fortnite (and frankly he and his friends moved on to Apex and then Valorant.)

    On the other hand, Fortnite was available on the Mac - and it runs well, so I have to respect the company for putting in that effort to port and maintain the platform. (Obviously Apex and Valorant are NOT on the Mac.)

    I have no love for Epic (because of the suit), but until they decided to sue Apple, they'd treated the Mac platform better than most cross-platform gaming developers...
    elijahgwatto_cobra
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