Apple Intelligence & iPhone mirroring aren't coming to EU because of the DMA

Posted:
in iOS edited June 21

Apple isn't releasing Apple Intelligence and other major operating system changes in the EU, because of Digital Markets Act interoperability mandates.

Hand holding a smartphone with visible app icons and notifications, against a background of yellow stars on a blue field similar to the European Union flag.
An iPhone running Apple Intelligence, in front of the EU flag



The biggest changes in Apple's fall operating system updates include the machine learning-based Apple Intelligence as well as iPhone Mirroring and SharePlay Screen Sharing. While most of the world should get the features in time, Apple says that the EU will miss out on the inbound tech.

Two weeks ago, Apple unveiled hundreds of new features that we are excited to bring to our users around the world. We are highly motivated to make these technologies accessible to all users. However, due to the regulatory uncertainties brought about by the Digital Markets Act (DMA), we do not believe that we will be able to roll out three of these features -- iPhone Mirroring, SharePlay Screen Sharing enhancements, and Apple Intelligence -- to our EU users this year.

Specifically, we are concerned that the interoperability requirements of the DMA could force us to compromise the integrity of our products in ways that risk user privacy and data security. We are committed to collaborating with the European Commission in an attempt to find a solution that would enable us to deliver these features to our EU customers without compromising their safety.



At the time of publication, checks on regional Apple Newsroom pages don't offer any statements beyond what Apple has provided, and even say that features like Apple Intelligence are on the way.

The Digital Markets Act sets rules to force Apple and other tech giants to open up various services, like the App Store, to encourage more competition. In the EU, Apple has already complied with some of the legislation, such as allowing alternative app storefronts to exist on iPhone, but it's still dragging its feet in other ways.

Apple has already been hit with a $2 billion fine for allegedly preventing Apple Music rivals from promoting cheaper alternatives. It also faces being the first to be fined over its anti-steering rules under the Digital Markets Act itself.

Apple Fellow Phil Schiller warned in February that the Digital Markets Act's implementation in the EU could become a privacy and security problem to consumers. While it introduces new dangers to the market, Schiller insisted Apple was doing whatever it could to minimize those risks.

Update June 21 4:24 PM ET Updated with Apple's statement on the matter.



Read on AppleInsider

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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 123
    ggwill0ggwill0 Posts: 9member
    😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂
    ssfe11dee_deetmay9secondkox2bshankappleinsideruseriOS_Guy80zeus423CookItOffTheSparkle
  • Reply 2 of 123
    jas99jas99 Posts: 159member
    Stand firm on security. 
    chasmdewmessfe11tmayAnilu_777MisterKit9secondkox2bshankiOS_Guy80zeus423
  • Reply 3 of 123
    ggwill0ggwill0 Posts: 9member
    That's what they get for telling an American company what to do...
    Afarstardewmessfe11tmayAnilu_7779secondkox2iOS_Guy80zeus423radarthekatbyronl
  • Reply 4 of 123
    chasmchasm Posts: 3,421member
    ggwill0 said:
    That's what they get for telling an American company what to do...
    Hell yeah! Why doesn’t every country just submit to anything Merka wants and bends over and takes it! YA-HOOO!

    LOL.

    The EU has the right to create regulations as they see fit. Apple has the right to not include some features that would be compromised by EU mandates in the EU.

    This is not a problem. One or more market and/or political forces will act to resolve this conflict, though that may take some time.

    To be clear, I think that if Apple sincerely believes current EU mandates compromise user security, it should not offer those features in the EU. It’s not “punishment,” it’s part of the company’s core value to protect user security. I don’t think it has anything to do with Apple wanting to “punish” the EU — their money is just as good as anyone else’s.

    If European users feel strongly enough that they want those features, they will reform the EU to allow companies like Apple and Microsoft (not you, Google) to prioritize user security and privacy. This may all take a long time, but a happy (or at least acceptable) medium will eventually be achieved.
    Scot1luke hamblydewmessfe11lam92103teejay2012tmaywilliamlondonsflagelAnilu_777
  • Reply 5 of 123
    Well, unfortunately none of the European users told the American company what to do so nice that you are showing your empathy for our plight. Thank you. 
    ssfe119secondkox2chasmlotonesAlex1Nwatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 123
    AfarstarAfarstar Posts: 59member
    Fantastic news. Anything Apple can do to screw the EU is fine by me. At least we’ll get all the features in the UK. 

    elijahgtwlevessfe11aderutterwilliamlondon9secondkox2bshankappleinsideruseriOS_Guy80zeus423
  • Reply 7 of 123
    ggwill0 said:
    That's what they get for telling an American company what to do...
    How utterly dare anybody tell an American company what to do. The very idea.
    Scot1ctt_zhnubuswilliamlondon9secondkox2sphericiOS_Guy80debonbonpascal007VictorMortimer
  • Reply 8 of 123
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,435member
    The EU is about to be far behind in the rear view mirror wrt technology. 
    The DMA defines interoperability as «the ability to exchange information and mutually use the information which has been exchanged through interfaces or other solutions, so that all elements of hardware or software work with other hardware and software and with users in all the ways in which they are intended to function»

    Sounds nice in practice but rapid development of new technologies requires an emphasis on speed.  

    As the old proverb states "you want to go fast, go alone.  You want to go far, go with a group" 

    It's important to differentiate nascent technology and the need for fast iteration as opposed to time tested and established technology which should be interoperable across a large group. 




    The DMA aims to extend interoperability to other communication tools, specifically messaging applications: namely, a WhatsApp user cannot send a message to a Telegram one. Nor can an iPhone owner send an online message to an Android user through the iMessage App. The means of communication must necessarily be a common platform, resulting in the aggregation of market power. Now, gatekeepers’ communications services, including messaging applications, will have to provide the necessary interfaces that allow for horizontal interoperability, that is, the interoperability among competing products

    Here is where I agree in part with the ideology of DMA.  Messaging apps are simple in nature. I'm exchanging text primarily which may have additional functionality.  That being said though I don't see Messaging apps as a significant impediment to communication.  Messaging would not be the proper litmus or use case for all digital technology. 

    9secondkox2watto_cobragilly33
  • Reply 9 of 123
    Afarstar said:
    Fantastic news. Anything Apple can do to screw the EU is fine by me. At least we’ll get all the features in the UK. 

    Oh dear.

    Yep, all the EU features like a single market, customs union, free movement, no roaming charges, being part of multiple cross-country organisations and initiatives. No, wait. We lost all those, and more, when we left. Never mind though ‘cos if Apple can stick it to the EU then who cares?
    ctt_zhwilliamlondon9secondkox2iOS_Guy80chasmLettuceblastdoorlotonesargonautmuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 10 of 123
    Hopefully that won’t effect us here in England
    Thank god for Brexit.
    edited June 21 aderutterwilliamlondon9secondkox2Kierkegaardenbyronljas99mikeybabesargonautwatto_cobragilly33
  • Reply 11 of 123
    Companies make rational choices based on the environment they do business in. Apple has to comply with local regulations and laws and if that means some features or products aren’t available because of those regulations/laws, so be it.

    Europe has been very protectionist, especially of Spotify, which is why we see the tone of some the comments. It’s not really surprising to see Apple react.
    teejay2012tmayradarthekatJaiOh81chasmjas99Alex1Nwatto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 123
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,961member
    ggwill0 said:
    That's what they get for telling an American company what to do...
    you do realize corporations aren’t people and the EU corporations are off shoots that are filed and exist independently as corporate entities in their respective operating countries, right? it ceases being a US company at that point, which is how & why they are taxed as citizens of those countries 
    9secondkox2sphericAlex1Nwatto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 123
    twlevetwleve Posts: 3member
    Hopefully that won’t effect us here in England
    Thank god for Brexit.
    Certainly hope it won't affect us, else I will need to change my Apple ID to a different country. Will that work?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 123
    ctt_zhctt_zh Posts: 83member
    twleve said:
    Hopefully that won’t effect us here in England
    Thank god for Brexit.
    Certainly hope it won't affect us, else I will need to change my Apple ID to a different country. Will that work?
    Why would it affect England? You've left the EU, it only affects the EU...
    Anilu_7779secondkox2argonautwatto_cobragilly33
  • Reply 15 of 123
    ssfe11ssfe11 Posts: 52member
    Woohoo! Luv it Apple! Screw the EU bullies. Let them fall far behind and their citizens feel it hard.
    9secondkox2iOS_Guy80zeus423watto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 123
    coolfactorcoolfactor Posts: 2,295member
    I hope that Apple sticks to this. As a matter of principle.

    Apple Intelligence will be so deeply integrated, but they must be building it in such a way where it can be disabled regionally. Interesting. Will VPNs trick it?
    zeus423ssfe11watto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 123
    netroxnetrox Posts: 1,464member
    chasm said: 

    The EU has the right to create regulations as they see fit. Apple has the right to not include some features that would be compromised by EU mandates in the EU.

    This is not a problem. One or more market and/or political forces will act to resolve this conflict, though that may take some time.
     
    I understand that but it won't end well. I am fed up with EU mandating that we see "cookie warning" every damn i visit a website and it's entirely the fault of EU's lack of understanding on cookies. 


    williamlondon9secondkox2zeus423CookItOffAfarstarssfe11chasmjas99teejay2012argonaut
  • Reply 18 of 123
    dewmedewme Posts: 5,545member
    My main issue with the way that the EU is operating under the DMA, based on my understanding, is that it seems full of holes, subject to personal whims, political, xenophobic, and massively ambiguous. I'm not just poking at it for personal reasons or to take up Apple's side in the ongoing conflict. I've actually followed, worked on, and directly contributed to "Standards" created or initiated in the EU, pre-EU member countries, or internationally. Standards and certification bodies like IEC, CE, TUV, ISO, UL, CSA, etc., add great value and are a lot more than just a set of requirements that have to be met. They are also highly prescriptive in nature so anyone hoping to sell products that meet these standards can build them to be compliant by following the recommendations and establishing quantifiable measures that can be used by producers to ensure that their products meet the standards. There should be no big surprises when the products in question are submitted for compliance testing.

    The one thing in common with most of the standards that establish hard requirements is that they are run by NGOs, not politicians or state leaders. Companies like Apple who produce products for international markets need to be able to design products that meet all the standards where they are sold. The DMA from what I can tell provides no prescriptive guidance for product makers to avoid getting "surprised" when they try to sell a product into a location. It's hard to build something to meet requirements that are highly volatile and enforced at the whim of the enforcers.

    I'm not saying the EU or DMA are wrong, because every other locale puts similar non-quantitative and highly subjective impediments in place. I'm just saying that it's a tough nut to crack and companies that sell into other markets need to protect themselves from impositions that they cannot predict. So Apple limiting what they sell into various markets is entirely defensible and a pragmatic decision, not a politically motivated one.
    Anilu_777radarthekatkiltedgreenjas99teejay2012Chris_PelhamargonautAlex1Nwatto_cobragilly33
  • Reply 19 of 123
    michelb76michelb76 Posts: 659member
    The EU accounts for a quarter of worldwide sales. It will come to the EU at some point. 
    williamlondon9secondkox2iOS_Guy80VictorMortimerchasms.metcalfargonaut
  • Reply 20 of 123
    michelb76 said:
    The EU accounts for a quarter of worldwide sales. It will come to the EU at some point. 
    Are you sure about that? I think “Europe”, as defined by Apple accounts for about 25% of sales, but that includes more than only the EU. If I remember correctly “Europe” in Apple financials included Africa and parts of the Middle East, for example, which aren’t included in the EU. 

    ETA: other countries that Apple classifies as “Europe” in its financials: Norway, Russia, Switzerland, UK, Ukraine. Also, I said “parts of the Middle East” but it’s the Middle East in its entirety. 
    edited June 21 aderutterwilliamlondon9secondkox2sphericJaiOh81ssfe11teejay2012argonautwatto_cobra
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