Mac mini reborn at MacWorld?

dwsdws
Posted:
in Future Apple Hardware edited January 2014
ThinkSecret is reporting that the Mac mini will be going through a major transformation in January; to be reborn into a digital hub device that will reside in the living room. Kaleidoscope (code name) will sport an Intel processor, an iPod dock and have TiVo-like DVR functionality.



If the device is going to happen, what specs and price points do you think would create the kind of phenomena that we've seen with the iPod? [Remember, everyone said that the iPod was too expensive and a niche device when it first came out; so don't fall into the trap of believing that Kaleidoscope has to have outrageous specifications and be sold at a loss in order to make it.]



I think that the specs and prices will be nearly identical to what is now offered:



$499

cheap processor

512Mb RAM

32Mb Video RAM

40Gb 2.5" hard drive

Combo drive

iPod dock

optional Airport Extreme

modem



$599

slightly better processor

same RAM

same Video RAM

80Gb 2.5" hard drive

Combo drive

iPod dock

Airport Extreme

no modem



$699

same slightly better processor

same RAM

same Video RAM

160Gb 2.5" hard drive (???)

SuperDrive

iPod dock

Airport Extreme

no modem



What do you think?
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 116
    eckingecking Posts: 1,588member
    I don't think 2.5" drives go as big as 160 yet. And the high range model had better have more than 32mb vram!
  • Reply 2 of 116
    telomartelomar Posts: 1,804member
    I wouldn't be surprised to see Apple try and launch a version of it in conjunction with Intel's Viiv and move at least one model to a higher price point than current mac minis in an effort to tackle the media centre market.
  • Reply 3 of 116
    if it has anything to do with Viiv that would be apple showing how to apply intel's tech superbly
  • Reply 4 of 116
    murkmurk Posts: 935member
    If this doesn't revive Kormac, he's actually dead.
  • Reply 5 of 116
    marzetta7marzetta7 Posts: 1,320member
    Hmm, very interesting indeed. If this rumor is true, it makes me wonder if Apple plans on releasing a line of displays for the home as well. A 65 inch Apple LCD with at least 1920 X 1080 resolution with 1080p playback would have me sold in the living room coupled with a Tivo-like Mac Mini. It also makes me wonder if Apple is really serious about making a big splash in the living room, if the top end Tivo-like Mac Mini would have a Blu-Ray drive so that we could play high definition movies on our lusted after Apple movie displays....



    However I doubt the hardware would be capable of the 1080p playback of Blu-Ray movies inside the Mac Mini given its current size. But who knows, if they will be transformed, then maybe they'll be given better hardware, albeit in a larger form factor. A man can dream can't he....
  • Reply 6 of 116
    Quote:

    Originally posted by murk

    If this doesn't revive Kormac, he's actually dead.



    I thought the same myself. I wonder how he is doing.



    Hope springs eternal,



    Mandricard

    AppleOutsider
  • Reply 7 of 116
    Quote:

    Originally posted by marzetta7

    Hmm, very interesting indeed. If this rumor is true, it makes me wonder if Apple plans on releasing a line of displays for the home as well. A 65 inch Apple LCD with at least 1920 X 1080 resolution with 1080p playback would have me sold in the living room coupled with a Tivo-like Mac Mini. It also makes me wonder if Apple is really serious about making a big splash in the living room, if the top end Tivo-like Mac Mini would have a Blu-Ray drive so that we could play high definition movies on our lusted after Apple movie displays....



    However I doubt the hardware would be capable of the 1080p playback of Blu-Ray movies inside the Mac Mini given its current size. But who knows, if they will be transformed, then maybe they'll be given better hardware, albeit in a larger form factor. A man can dream can't he....




    I just picked up a Westinghouse 37" 1080p monitor last weekend for $1,700. I seriously hope Apple does something affordable for my HD living room because I'll have something that can drive this monitor at 1080p within the next 3 months (only have 1080i from cable now).
  • Reply 8 of 116
    Apple should rebrand this



    Mac media center



    1. Utilize Solo and Duo Core Yonah's

    2. Make it larger and use 3.5' SATA drives.

    3. Add HDMI connections include HDMI-DVI adapter

    4. Add a TV Tuner
  • Reply 9 of 116
    funny to me the code name is Kaleidoscope since there is a company in the MC business called Kaleidescape (Not that they are related in any way, just ironic)
  • Reply 10 of 116
    elronelron Posts: 126member
    It seems to me that most people get HD programming from a set-top box through cable or satellite. I don't know anyone that actually receives HD over the air. For me to actually buy one of these machines, it would have to sport a CableCard 1.0 slot so I can descramble my cable provider's signal (the as-yet-unreleased CableCard 2.0 would be even better -- that would allow you to receive on-demand content and on-screen programming guides).



    Micosoft has already announced CableCard support in Windows Vista, which means their Media Center PCs will support it as well.
  • Reply 11 of 116
    cosmonutcosmonut Posts: 4,872member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by elron

    It seems to me that most people get HD programming from a set-top box through cable or satellite. I don't know anyone that actually receives HD over the air.



    Most satellite users receive local HD stations over the air. Some cable operators monkey around with the data rates when they pass local HD stations through, causing (more) artifacting of the image.
  • Reply 12 of 116
    It's about goddamn time!



    Apple marketed to my need to manage my photos, music, home videos, and more, but for the longest ass time it seemed like Jobs was hell bent on denying me the ability to manage my favorite passtime, TV.



    I always thought it ironic that Steve said TV was where you went to turn your brain off when you would have to have your brain turned off not to take the money from me and my brain-dead brethren.



    I'm such a pessimst at this point I know they will screw it up.
  • Reply 13 of 116
    rolorolo Posts: 686member
    I was very happy to see the TS article. I've always wanted Apple to make a fancy DVR. Here's what I'd really like to see:
    • New, larger form factor more like that of a DVD player

    • Lots of jacks on the back

    • Built-in cable TV tuner

    • Apple remote with tuner buttons

    • Full function DVR software

    • Built-in Broadcom real time H.264 chip

    • Full size 3.5" large capacity HD

    • High speed DL DVD burner or Blu-ray

    • Built-in Bluetooth and next gen AirPort Extreme 108Mbps

    It just occurred to me that if it's to have a built-in iPod dock, it'd be best if it weren't on top. It'd be cool if a dock tray could extend from the front.
  • Reply 14 of 116
    Caeser of ArsTechnica doesn't seem to think so.
  • Reply 15 of 116
    dwsdws Posts: 108member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Gene Clean

    Caeser of ArsTechnica doesn't seem to think so.



    I think Caesar is right. Forget DVR. Forget TV tuner cards. Forget grandiose plans of any kind!



    The original Mac mini started the Mac world looking in the direction of the living room; with enterprising folks taking it further through lots of tinkering.



    I believe that the next Mac mini will take a step into the living room, but only one step. Basically, I think that Apple will position the Mac mini as a great little box; which will offer a slightly-enhanced Front Row. It is clear that Apple wants to sell video; and they will make that concept more attractive to the media companies by selling a handy little box that connects to a TV, but without any risk to the media company's profits - or Apple's!!!
  • Reply 16 of 116
    cosmonutcosmonut Posts: 4,872member
    I agree with everyone who...agrees with....Caeser.



    \



    We won't see an Apple DVR. Period. We will see a media appliance that can play and stream music and video from iTunes, DVD projects from iDVD, movies straight from iMovie, photos from iPhoto, presentations from Keynote 2, etc. Really, the Mac mini can already do most of that, but it doesn't have Front Row yet. It also could use a form factor shift to fit better into the components in a home theater setup (i.e. pizza boxy).



    Apple would NOT start selling shows for $2 on iTunes then create software that allows people to do the same for free. Having a media appliance like I mentioned above still doesn't allow for people to "turn off" their minds. It simply gives people another way to play their stuff -- bought or created -- on a display and audio system.
  • Reply 17 of 116
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,258member
    Once you've watched TV through a DVR and reclaimed back %25 of your viewing time you won't want to watch TV without it.



    The choice really isn't Apple's. No DVR is going to equal no buy for many people.
  • Reply 18 of 116
    brussellbrussell Posts: 9,812member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by hmurchison

    Once you've watched TV through a DVR and reclaimed back %25 of your viewing time you won't want to watch TV without it.



    The choice really isn't Apple's. No DVR is going to equal no buy for many people.




    Isn't it true that the number of people who currently use them is still exceedingly tiny?
  • Reply 19 of 116
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Gene Clean

    Caeser of ArsTechnica doesn't seem to think so.



    Man, this Caser guy seems to be out to confirm my pessimism, even mentioning my namesake in the article. So I'll try to be a little more positive-



    The pros would seem to be-



    1. If the content providers aren't signing up for the Applestore to provide video, Apple could just profit off of people wanting to record the shows for free (by buying a mac PVR). At the very least its leverage.



    2. Integrating iTunes video with a Mac PVR on scren guide would be a natural way to get customers. Forgot to record show? Just click to buy.



    3. Halo effect from video ipod would be much more strong if there was a mac who's main job was to put video on your ipod.



    On the negative side I can see Apple screwing it up the following ways-



    1. Subscription based TV guide.

    2. Not letting you use external hard drives for more storage.

    3. DRMing recorded shows.

    4. No DVD burning option.
  • Reply 20 of 116
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,258member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by BRussell

    Isn't it true that the number of people who currently use them is still exceedingly tiny?



    With the CableCos installing new DVR by the thousands daily expect it to change. In fact my installation is happening today for Digital Cable and a HDTV DVR.



    Quote:

    If the content providers aren't signing up for the Applestore to provide video, Apple could just profit off of people wanting to record the shows for free (by buying a mac PVR). At the very least its leverage.



    Paying for TV shows and DVR recording can be mutually exclusive. Apple shouldn't be attempting to limit choice here IMO. They do so at their own peril.



    2. Agree



    3. People want more flexibility with their shows. The Halo effect of a killer Apple implementation could be huge.







    Quote:

    1. Subscription based TV guide.

    2. Not letting you use external hard drives for more storage.

    3. DRMing recorded shows.

    4. No DVD burning option.



    1. .mac offers a bit of infrastructur but FREE as in beer would rock.

    2. Please oh please put a FW or eSATA port on everything

    3. Likely to happen

    4. Wouldn't be surprised. Consumer rights are an afterthought.
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