Suppliers hope Apple Newton pad boosts Flash orders

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  • Reply 41 of 106
    quinneyquinney Posts: 2,528member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by melgross View Post




    It would also allow the multitouch, but stylus free, GUI to function in a way that would allow more programs than would be effective on the smaller devices, such as drawing and painting programs.




    I am not sure I understand what you are saying here. I know a lot of people who use

    drawing and painting programs like using an implement. I think some might feel

    a finger is just not accurate enough for drawing and painting.
  • Reply 42 of 106
    ronboronbo Posts: 669member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by aaarrrgggh View Post


    Look at the Eee PC as an indicator of what markets are out there that Apple could bridge between the iPhone and MBA-- something with a 6-10" screen size has a solid opportunity. I know for myself, it is my preferred note pad size (5x8"), and it would be just big enough that not everything would need to be zoomed in on to make out...



    I see the Eee PC as more of an indicator that there are people who will buy an impossibly cheap laptop, even if it's tiny and sux



    Apple's not in that market, as nearly as I can tell.
  • Reply 43 of 106
    olternautolternaut Posts: 1,376member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post


    Except for the issue of the ATOM processor sucking with respect to what is already in the AIR. ATOM is interesting but lets face it it is not the equivalent of a desktop nor laptop processor.



    For some the performance loss might not matter. Especially if an AIR variant could be had that doubles battery life time.



    Dave



    Intel just announced the Atom dual-core. Apple might already have first pickings. Besides, the atom is designed for small mid devices not really for laptops. But I guess that has already been mentioned.
  • Reply 44 of 106
    quinneyquinney Posts: 2,528member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Olternaut View Post


    Its been a slow day at work this morning.



    Are you sure it isn't that Absinthe you keep in your desk drawer?
  • Reply 45 of 106
    olternautolternaut Posts: 1,376member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by quinney View Post


    Are you sure it isn't that Absinthe you keep in your desk drawer?



    errmm........umm...no.
  • Reply 46 of 106
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 13,377member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mjteix View Post


    Keep in mind that those chips don't have all the technologies of the Core architecture (Cache, FSB, SSE...) but are multithread capable (2 threads per core). So in terms of raw power the Diamondville DC is powerful, we have no idea yet about how it could compare to a full fledge Merom or penryn at the same clock.



    If one looks at the specs carefully a good guess would be half the performance of current Merom hardware. It is a case not just of not having OOOE but also very limited resources to execute with. Combine this with limited cache and slow busses and we have an energy efficient but slow processor.



    At least for the general case. I do suspect that the ATOM's will do well on certain codes.

    Quote:

    What's also interesting will be the price of those chips, silverthorne 1.6GHz may start at $29!!!!!



    That would be a good starting point with prices working lower over time. The big benefit from ATOM isn't the possibility of high performance as that simply won't happen. It is rather the possibility that devices that could not have been made before will be made. Specifically a 64 bit computer that sits in the palm of your hand and runs all day.



    Dave
  • Reply 47 of 106
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mjteix View Post


    ...

    Keep in mind that those chips don't have all the technologies of the Core architecture (Cache, FSB, SSE...) but are multithread capable (2 threads per core). So in terms of raw power the Diamondville DC is powerful, we have no idea yet about how it could compare to a full fledge Merom or penryn at the same clock.



    What's also interesting will be the price of those chips, silverthorne 1.6GHz may start at $29!!!!!



    Thanks for the images.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by quinney View Post


    I am not sure I understand what you are saying here. I know a lot of people who use

    drawing and painting programs like using an implement. I think some might feel

    a finger is just not accurate enough for drawing and painting.



    I see no reason why a larger capacitance touch device couldn't also utilize a specialized stylus for fine detail work.
  • Reply 48 of 106
    ronboronbo Posts: 669member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Booga View Post


    As much as I love my iPod Touch (and I owned a Newton 130 back in the day), I'm very skeptical. The Touch is great because it's the perfect size and weight for carrying in your pocket balanced against having enough screen real estate to actually browse the web. Too much bigger and you won't carry it everywhere, and any smaller and the screen becomes less useful. I couldn't see adding more than half-an-inch to maybe an inch in either width or height and having it have the same appeal.



    ++

    I loved my Newton 2000. But I remember watching the Palm taking over. I thought my Newton did better handwriting recognition, and did it more gracefully. But yet the Palm took over. Everybody you asked said the same two things: It was cheaper, and it fit in the pocket.
  • Reply 49 of 106
    olternautolternaut Posts: 1,376member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ronbo View Post


    ++

    I loved my Newton 2000. But I remember watching the Palm taking over. I thought my Newton did better handwriting recognition, and did it more gracefully. But yet the Palm took over. Everybody you asked said the same two things: It was cheaper, and it fit in the pocket.



    That is why I think the new product will do both. It will be as big (or close) as the original newton screenwise but still be able to fit in the pocket like an ipod touch.

    That might imply that part of the unit will be foldable or its shape be changeable in some way.

    Tricorder anybody?
  • Reply 50 of 106
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,335member
    As Jobs has said at various times, Apple has many prototypes of products in their labs. That doesn't mean that more than a fraction will ever see the light of day.



    In my own company, we used to develop equipment that we never intended to manufacturer, or sell. It was done to see if certain features, technologies, designs, and packaging, was feasible. Some of that could, and would, go into other products along the line, without that actual model ever becoming a product in its own right.



    I'm sure Apple does the exact same thing.
  • Reply 51 of 106
    Corn growers hope influx of unicorns will boost delivery volumes.
  • Reply 52 of 106
    olternautolternaut Posts: 1,376member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by melgross View Post


    As Jobs has said at various times, Apple has many prototypes of products in their labs. That doesn't mean that more than a fraction will ever see the light of day.



    In my own company, we used to develop equipment that we never intended to manufacturer, or sell. It was done to see if certain features, technologies, designs, and packaging, was feasible. Some of that could, and would, go into other products along the line, without that actual model ever becoming a product in its own right.



    I'm sure Apple does the exact same thing.



    Yes. And as it has been confirmed the iphone started out as the safari pad prototype. And that was some years ago. I believe the days of it being a prototype though is over. And that it will see the light of day as a production model soon........very soon.
  • Reply 53 of 106
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,335member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by quinney View Post


    I am not sure I understand what you are saying here. I know a lot of people who use

    drawing and painting programs like using an implement. I think some might feel

    a finger is just not accurate enough for drawing and painting.



    That's been one of my biggest complaints about the devices. I said this on earlier threads. I think that Apple should have allowed the use of a stylus, but they have a certain goal in mind, and so they didn't.



    There was a program on display, I think, at the news conferebce on the 6th, that showed a very basic drawing application.



    With greater screen size, and rez, I think that it could be done. nothing sophisticated of course, but enough to be useful. The ability to do this is already available.
  • Reply 54 of 106
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,335member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by quinney View Post


    Are you sure it isn't that Absinthe you keep in your desk drawer?



    There is now proof that Absinth doesn't do what it used to be thought it did. In fact, here in the US, it will be allowed again, with several new products coming to market.



    I just had to mention that.
  • Reply 55 of 106
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,335member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    Thanks for the images.







    I see no reason why a larger capacitance touch device couldn't also utilize a specialized stylus for fine detail work.



    I also don't see that it's impossible to come out with something that mimics the fingers electrical, er, fingerprint.



    In fact, I'm surprised that something hasn't already come out.
  • Reply 56 of 106
    gqbgqb Posts: 1,934member
    Unless I'm missing it, the one word missing from this thread is 'games'.

    Games on a touch/iPhone will be nice... games on a 7" tablet format (with all the other mobile platform capabilities) could be killer app time.

    (And I'm not even a gamer. Just saw my 10 year old daughter's reaction to the Monkey Ball demo.
  • Reply 57 of 106
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,335member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by GQB View Post


    Unless I'm missing it, the one word missing from this thread is 'games'.

    Games on a touch/iPhone will be nice... games on a 7" tablet format (with all the other mobile platform capabilities) could be killer app time.

    (And I'm not even a gamer. Just saw my 10 year old daughter's reaction to the Monkey Ball demo.



    Oh, sure. This would beat the PSP any way you look at it. But games would have to be a secondary function, as it would cost too much.
  • Reply 58 of 106
    trboydentrboyden Posts: 165member
    All this talk about Newtons and tablet PCs has me wishing Apple would just make the MacBook line into convertible tablet PCs. The best ones I've tried to date were - the now discontinued - Acer Travelmate series tablet PCs. They had the best mix of features, and were light-weight (for a tablet PC). The next best option that is still available is the Lenovo X61 series tablet PC (link). At a price around $1500, that fits right in with the higher end of the MacBook line which is where Apple probably would position it.
  • Reply 59 of 106
    tofinotofino Posts: 697member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ronbo View Post


    ++

    I loved my Newton 2000. But I remember watching the Palm taking over. I thought my Newton did better handwriting recognition, and did it more gracefully. But yet the Palm took over. Everybody you asked said the same two things: It was cheaper, and it fit in the pocket.



    I still have my Newton MP 100, an MP 130, a screen busted MP 2000 (that hurt!) and a MP 2100. By the time the Newton got 'steved', it was just about ready to make a difference: The handwriting recognition worked, the battery life was measured in weeks, it had a built email that worked with CompuServe, AOL, the internet and there was even a version made by motorola that had a cell phone built in. It truly set the standard for functionality that still pops up ever time a new 'revolution' in mobile computing is upon us.



    At a thousand dollar it was certainly always going to be a niche market, but it certainly had the potential to take off. I believe that it got killed at least in part for personal reasons by our 'Dear Leader', and considering the lack of focus at Apple at the time, it was probably the right decision.



    That doesn't mean however that some of the concepts in the Newton OS are forgotten at Apple. Handwriting recognition is part of OSX, probably used by nobody, but available. The Newton's cut and paste system (drag an item into the margin of the screen to copy, drag it back out to paste) worked well in a touch environment and is likely going to come back to the iPhone/iPod Touch.



    However... I think that Apple will do ANYTHING to avoid bringing out a device that draws more comparison to the Newton than the iPhone already did. I remember reading about at a shareholder meeting where Mr. Jobs got asked: "What about the Newton?". It was reported (rumored?) that his response was something like "I'll tell you what you can do with your Newton..."



    So I for one would not hold my breath.



    And yes, I'd be buying one.
  • Reply 60 of 106
    echosonicechosonic Posts: 462member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by IQ78 View Post


    They then might allow other companies to use OSXmobile on their own smart phones, while Apple works on turning the world into a OSX world instead of Windows world, since the new world will be mobile. We will see.





    Agree with the rest, but I think this will never happen. One thing Apple has always done is control the User Experience. It is the only way they can be certain the U.E. will always be stunning.



    Open up OSX mobile to vendors and you let go of that control. Apple would never want any user to have a shitty experience and thus ammo by which to say "Oh yeah I used OSXM on my RAZR5 and it sucks, I get crashes, the camera looks like ass, etc...



    No way Jose. Not Apple. Never gonna happen.
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