Apple's iPhone 3G guided tour reveals extra details

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2014
New video walkthroughs of iPhone 3G help illustrate how to use the phone and what's changed in software, but also spill details of changes to the hardware design, a free official AOL instant messenger client, and more.



The guided tours are available in both a 38-minute beginner's guide to the entire phone or a condensed, 12-minute edition that shows just the new features added with iPhone 3G and its iPhone 2.0 software.



One of the most conspicuous changes is to the speakers. Briefly alluded to during the iPhone 3G's introduction at WWDC, the "dramatically improved audio" of the updated iPhone is now attributed directly to its new microphone and speakers.



A look at the bottom of the device, which has been hidden from view in most early looks, also shows two screws at either end of the Dock Connector -- an unusual design concession for a company that normally prides itself on hiding screws from view on its handheld devices.







And while most software demonstrations in the videos are of expected features, the front view of the App Store shows an AIM (AOL Instant Messenger) application that confirms a March 6th demo has translated to a finished and likely free application that may be available with the App Store's opening on July 11th.



The software could potentially be used to mitigate the lack of include SMS messages with AT&T's standard iPhone plans.



Downloading and installing third-party applications is also shown to be different than with purchases through the iTunes Wi-Fi Music Store. Instead of managing a separate queue, inbound apps surface directly on the home screen, with a progress bar indicating how close they are to completion. Apps immediately become active once downloaded.







Update: AppleInsider forum member Berzerker notes that the guided tour also demonstrates a feature of iPhone 2.0 that will allow users to enable Wi-Fi on Wi-Fi enabled flights without leaving Airplane mode.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 62
    merdheadmerdhead Posts: 587member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    A look at the bottom of the device, which has been hidden from view in most early looks, also shows two screws at either end of the Dock Connector -- an unusual design concession for a company that normally prides itself on hiding screws from view on its handheld devices.



    Yeah, like the seven screws on my MacBook, including two on one side that are purely cosmetic.



    Thank you again for your thoughtful analysis, AI.
  • Reply 2 of 62
    berzerkerberzerker Posts: 28member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    New video walkthroughs of iPhone 3G help illustrate how to use the phone and what's changed in software, but also spill details of changes to the hardware design, a free official AOL instant messenger client, and more.



    The guided tours are available in both a 38-minute beginner's guide to the entire phone or a condensed, 12-minute edition that shows just the new features added with iPhone 3G and its iPhone 2.0 software.



    One of the most conspicuous changes is to the speakers. Briefly alluded to during the iPhone 3G's introduction at WWDC, the "dramatically improved audio" of the updated iPhone is now attributed directly to its new microphone and speakers.



    A look at the bottom of the device, which has been hidden from view in most early looks, also shows two screws at either end of the Dock Connector -- an unusual design concession for a company that normally prides itself on hiding screws from view on its handheld devices.







    And while most software demonstrations in the videos are of expected features, the front view of the App Store shows an AIM (AOL Instant Messenger) application that confirms a March 6th demo has translated to a finished and likely free application that may be available with the App Store's opening on July 11th.



    The software could potentially be used to mitigate the lack of include SMS messages with AT&T's standard iPhone plans.



    Downloading and installing third-party applications is also shown to be different than with purchases through the iTunes Wi-Fi Music Store. Instead of managing a separate queue, inbound apps surface directly on the home screen, with a progress bar indicating how close they are to completion. Apps immediately become active once downloaded.







    There's also another new feature of the 2.0 software. The tour guide mentions that if you're on a wi-fi enabled flight, you can turn on wi-fi without leaving Airplane mode, and demonstrates this feature. This is not possible in 1.1.4 and earlier. In these versions, Airplane mode MUST be off for Wi-Fi to be enabled.
  • Reply 3 of 62
    jmadlenajmadlena Posts: 43member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by merdhead View Post


    Yeah, like the seven screws on my MacBook, including two on one side that are purely cosmetic.



    Thank you again for your thoughtful analysis, AI.



    Compared to other companies, they are very right. Most companies don't give 25 screws on the face of an object as a big deal. Apple will do things to avoid it. No need to be an ass.
  • Reply 4 of 62
    peteropetero Posts: 94member
    Maybe the two screws facilitate battery replacement....?
  • Reply 5 of 62
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by merdhead View Post


    Yeah, like the seven screws on my MacBook, including two on one side that are purely cosmetic.



    Thank you again for your thoughtful analysis, AI.



    You missed where AI said: "...hiding screws from view on its handheld devices."



    Your MacBook is not a handheld device.
  • Reply 6 of 62
    merdheadmerdhead Posts: 587member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jmadlena View Post


    Compared to other companies, they are very right. Most companies don't give 25 screws on the face of an object as a big deal. Apple will do things to avoid it. No need to be an ass.



    There's no need for you to be an arse, calling me an ass. The statement isn't supported by the facts. Apple don't care about screws, they care about design. Screws are neither here nor there. What other companies do with respect to their screws is irrelevant.



    AI has a long history of delivering the most appalling analysis. Only ongoing, harsh criticism will make them stop.
  • Reply 7 of 62
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by PeterO View Post


    Maybe the two screws facilitate battery replacement....?



    The screws are simply there to get access to the insides of the iPhone. Since there is no longer a plastic butt on the new model they either had to add screws or attempt to come up with some self-clipping back (a la iPods, Mac Mini). I assume the tolerances inside are just too tight for that sort of design so they went with screws.
  • Reply 8 of 62
    merdheadmerdhead Posts: 587member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Matthew Yohe View Post


    You missed where AI said: "...hiding screws from view on its handheld devices."



    Your MacBook is not a handheld device.



    I hold it in my hand all day (the MacBook). Also the statement hasn't got any basis. There is no evidence that Apple "pride themselves" on having no screws. It's just AI making things up (like saying Apple will use Atom processors "real soon now", where as even Intel has said it's not the case, see http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/0...ast/index.html) then stating it as fact.



    Just stick to the news, AI, please.
  • Reply 9 of 62
    bageljoeybageljoey Posts: 2,006member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by merdhead View Post


    AI has a long history of delivering the most appalling analysis. Only ongoing, harsh criticism will make them stop.



    Actually, they depend on traffic, hits, and click-throughs-- not nice comments. Unless you mean that your harsh criticism will drive other viewers from the site...





    Now, I wouldn't go so far as calling you names, but seriously, if you think that AI's analysis is "most appalling" why even bother? Maybe they are too far gone for your artful corrective measures.





    PS The Mini died a year ago!
  • Reply 10 of 62
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by merdhead View Post


    I hold it in my hand all day (the MacBook). Also the statement hasn't got any basis. There is no evidence that Apple "pride themselves" on having no screws. It's just AI making things up (like saying Apple will use Atom processors "real soon now", where as even Intel has said it's not the case, see http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/0...ast/index.html) then stating it as fact.



    From the article you're citing: "Mr. Gelsinger acknowledged that Intel had lost the heated bidding for the next generation of Apple?s iPods and iPhones.



    ?Apple chose not to take that roadmap at their next generation of that platform,? he said, adding: ?I don?t think that means that we?re not ever going to have them on that roadmap.?



    We knew this when they bought PA Semi.



    Also, if I recall, AI only mentioned an eventuality of the move to Atom on iPhones, not a certainty. AI seemed more certain of a tablet/laptop appearance.



    Lastly, let's not play word games here: it doesn't matter what you call your MacBook, it's not a "Handheld Device."
  • Reply 11 of 62
    claude427claude427 Posts: 28member
    I am totally surprised by the dearth of comments about the possible mitigation of the fees proposed by AT&T for SMS, give the overwhelm debate in an earlier post. That, to me, is the biggest news in this article.
  • Reply 12 of 62
    aplnubaplnub Posts: 2,605member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Berzerker View Post


    There's also another new feature of the 2.0 software. The tour guide mentions that if you're on a wi-fi enabled flight, you can turn on wi-fi without leaving Airplane mode, and demonstrates this feature. This is not possible in 1.1.4 and earlier. In these versions, Airplane mode MUST be off for Wi-Fi to be enabled.



    I would never be so lucky to be on one of those flights.
  • Reply 13 of 62
    cameronjcameronj Posts: 2,357member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Claude427 View Post


    I am totally surprised by the dearth of comments about the possible mitigation of the fees proposed by AT&T for SMS, give the overwhelm debate in an earlier post. That, to me, is the biggest news in this article.



    Something tells me that all the buddies on my list that are actually mobiles won't actually work on the iPhone AIM client. That would totally replace SMS.
  • Reply 14 of 62
    rg_spbrg_spb Posts: 21member
    They mention speaker (singular) and microphone. Which means only one of those is a speaker (the one on the left per the demo) and the other is the microphone.
  • Reply 15 of 62
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by PeterO View Post


    Maybe the two screws facilitate battery replacement....?



    My first thought was that they may be to facilitate the replacement of broken backs, which are now plastic as opposed to the aluminum on the original iPhone. Good move actually, given the fact that it IS a phone and it WILL be dropped.



    Whatever the two screws are for, there's a good reason they're there and I doubt anyone will gripe about them.
  • Reply 16 of 62
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,953member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by merdhead View Post


    I hold it in my hand all day (the MacBook). Also the statement hasn't got any basis.



    Your unwillingness to accept the jargon of the industry doesn't void the jargon. Just because you might hold it in your hand while using it doesn't make it a "handheld" class of device in terms of how the industry classifies devices.
  • Reply 17 of 62
    One detail is missing is how the AT&T rep will activate iphone? If he's going be holding it, his hands better be clean.
  • Reply 18 of 62
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,953member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by meeksdigital View Post


    My first thought was that they may be to facilitate the replacement of broken backs, which are now plastic as opposed to the aluminum on the original iPhone. Good move actually, given the fact that it IS a phone and it WILL be dropped.



    Assuming it's not going to be polycarbonate, which is what Apple usually chooses for plastic device cases. Polycarbonate can't really be shattered. Well, maybe it can be, but PC will still return to its shape after a much higher impact than it takes to put a very ugly dent in aluminum. Just because something is a plastic doesn't mean you can assume anything other than a certain type of molecular make-up.



    Quote:

    Whatever the two screws are for, there's a good reason they're there and I doubt anyone will gripe about them.



    Personally, I don't think it's that big of a deal.
  • Reply 19 of 62
    icfireballicfireball Posts: 2,594member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post


    Your unwillingness to accept the jargon of the industry doesn't void the jargon. Just because you might hold it in your hand while using it doesn't make it a "handheld" class of device.



    Yes, and merdhead: what AppleInsider wrote was completely relevant and acceptable. Apple DOES pride itself in it's sleek and "seamless" (notice the quotes) designs. If you went to see Wall-e, you would notice the jokes and references to this. And keep in mind that Pixar's CEO is non other than the elusive Steve Jobs.
  • Reply 20 of 62
    anantksundaramanantksundaram Posts: 20,407member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by merdhead View Post


    Just stick to the news, AI, please.



    That is your view. My view, for instance is: I want AI to be AI. If I want just 'news,' I'll stick to the New York Times (or BBC, whatever).



    If you have a problem with that, you should go somewhere else. It's not like AI is the only Apple-related news and rumors site out there.
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