Hospital says Steve Jobs in 'excellent' state following liver transplant

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
In a bid to settle the question of his health once and for all, Apple chief Steve Jobs has acknowledged that he did undergo a liver transplant at Methodist University Hospital and that he has come out of surgery in good condition.



The executive gave permission to the Tennessee hospital to publish the news after a leak on Friday had all but confirmed the operation in the southeastern state.



Program director Dr. James D. Eason justified a transplant of the sort, which can sometimes be controversial due to its uncertainty, by noting that Jobs likely needed it. He was the patient with the greatest likelihood of developing an end-stage liver disease among those with a blood type matching the next available donor liver; as such, he was a prime candidate for the operation.



Even so, as he was the patient with the greatest risk in the waiting line, the Apple co-founder is now believed to have come out of his surgery with an "excellent prognosis" and a strong recovery.



Jobs declined to provide more information on the reasons for the surgery or his current state, but experts may have answered these questions themselves. Physicians speculating about the operation suggest that, like the majority patients who recovered from the form of pancreatic cancer he had in 2004, the cancer had metastasized in his liver, creating the "hormonal imbalance" that ultimately forced Jobs to take leave of his normal office for the past six months.



Tennessee is known to have been chosen for the small size of its transplant waiting list. Where the median number of days a patient would have to wait for a procedure in the US was 306 as of 2006, Tennessee's list was just 48 -- enough to virtually guarantee an operation during Jobs' hiatus. Methodist University Hospital also points out that it's one of the ten largest locations offering liver transplants in the US and that Jobs specifically chose the hospital due to its strong reputation for patient survival rates.



While it's not known just how healthy the Apple CEO is or when his surgery actually took place -- the most recent leak points to two months earlier -- Jobs has purportedly been seen on campus this week. He was also quoted in a press release for the first time in months on Monday, hinting that he's ready to return to work in at least a partial capacity.
«13

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 46
    gregoriusmgregoriusm Posts: 493member
    My hope is that he is able to return to a reasonable state of health and enjoyment of life, and continues as long as possible to be the visionary that he is at Apple.



    He has a capable team, and he can live a good life while still being a part of his passion - Apple and all that entails.



    All the best to you Steve!
  • Reply 2 of 46
    sybariticsybaritic Posts: 340member
    As a resident of Tennessee and as a fan of the tremendous creativity that Jobs's work has unleashed around the world, I wish him health, happiness, and a long life. Be well, Steve.
  • Reply 3 of 46
    quadra 610quadra 610 Posts: 6,756member
    Nice to know that, for the time being, Steve's pulled through.
  • Reply 4 of 46
    mactrippermactripper Posts: 1,328member
    Quote:

    Jobs has purportedly been seen on campus this week. He was also quoted in a press release for the first time in months on Monday, hinting that he's ready to return to work in at least a partial capacity.



    Long enough to drag "our customers only love glossy screens" Phillip Schiller into a back room somewhere and beat some sense into him.
  • Reply 5 of 46
    virgil-tb2virgil-tb2 Posts: 1,416member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    ... Physicians speculating about the operation suggest that, like the majority patients who recovered from the form of pancreatic cancer he had in 2004, the cancer had metastasized in his liver, creating the "hormonal imbalance" that ultimately forced Jobs to take leave of his normal office for the past six months. ...



    Again you guys publish this idea that "his cancer returned," yet this very site has published a couple of articles indicating that the type of cancer he has *rarely* metastasises.



    Which is it? Either he had the type of pancreatic cancer that rarely recurs or spreads, or he had the kind that spreads in "the majority." It can't be both.



    You also mention that the reason for replacing the liver is to decrease the likelihood of liver "disease" but then say that "Physician's speculate" that this is instead due to cancer. WTF?



    Did he have his liver cut out because of complications from the previous procedure or because he had cancer? They are completely different things that would give him totally different future outcomes. With the cancer one he's likely to die soon regardless of how successful the operation was, with the other one he could live for decades more.
  • Reply 6 of 46
    ipedroipedro Posts: 63member
    While he may be in "excellent condition", the sad truth is that transplanted organs require a barrage of daily medication to prevent his body from rejecting the alien organ (alien as in not recognized by his system to be a natural part of his body).



    Transplanted livers can last in the best case scenario for up to 10 years. At that time, he will either require a new transplant or we'll have figured a way to reliably grow organs from a patients own DNA, meaning that he'll get a new liver that is his own.



    In the meantime, I'm sure Steve will begin preparing for his exit (which could still take years).



    Any man with the knowledge that his ilfe could end in 10 years or less would choose family over work. I expect Steve to work at Apple for the next 2 years at most and then perhaps retain a small role as a consultant for the company while he enjoys life with his wife, kids and friends.
  • Reply 7 of 46
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MacTripper View Post


    Long enough to drag "our customers only love glossy screens" Phillip Schiller into a back room somewhere and beat some sense into him.



    Or all those flubbed App demos.....
  • Reply 8 of 46
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Virgil-TB2 View Post


    Again you guys publish this idea that "his cancer returned," yet this very site has published a couple of articles indicating that the type of cancer he has *rarely* metastasises.



    Which is it? Either he had the type of pancreatic cancer that rarely recurs or spreads, or he had the kind that spreads in "the majority." It can't be both.



    You also mention that the reason for replacing the liver is to decrease the likelihood of liver "disease" but then say that "Physician's speculate" that this is instead due to cancer. WTF?



    Did he have his liver cut out because of complications from the previous procedure or because he had cancer? They are completely different things that would give him totally different future outcomes. With the cancer one he's likely to die soon regardless of how successful the operation was, with the other one he could live for decades more.



    You obviously missed the very informative thread on this on AI from a few days ago, where a few seemingly knowledgable onclogist-types explained it well.



    (If you scroll down on AI's main page, you should still be able to see it.)



    Or, see Kibitzer's very helpful post right below......
  • Reply 9 of 46
    kibitzerkibitzer Posts: 1,114member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Virgil-TB2 View Post


    Again you guys publish this idea that "his cancer returned," yet this very site has published a couple of articles indicating that the type of cancer he has *rarely* metastasises.



    Which is it? Either he had the type of pancreatic cancer that rarely recurs or spreads, or he had the kind that spreads in "the majority." It can't be both.



    You also mention that the reason for replacing the liver is to decrease the likelihood of liver "disease" but then say that "Physician's speculate" that this is instead due to cancer. WTF?



    Did he have his liver cut out because of complications from the previous procedure or because he had cancer? They are completely different things that would give him totally different future outcomes. With the cancer one he's likely to die soon regardless of how successful the operation was, with the other one he could live for decades more.



    It can be confusing, but here is what one medical specialist by the handle "agrothey" posted on a related thread here a few days ago:



    "Liver transplant for neuroendocrine cancer

    As a GI medical oncologist, I can assure you that a liver transplantation is one of the options to treat a metastatic neuroendocrine cancer of the pancreas. What most people do not realize is that SJ did NOT suffer from a "normal" pancreatic cancer, but from a rare tumor called "islet cell cancer", which is associated with a much better prognosis than pancreatic cancer. These tumors unfortunately commonly metastasize (seed) into the liver - but a liver transplant can cure patients.

    The WSJ story is perfectly plausible and explains some of the issues I was wondering about, e.g. the predefined set time frame of SJ's return to work."



    It will help you further if you take the time to read all of agrothey's posts in the thread at this link:



    http://forums.appleinsider.com/showt...threadid=99518
  • Reply 10 of 46
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by iPedro View Post


    Any man with the knowledge that his ilfe could end in 10 years or less would choose family over work.



    And, how do you know that?
  • Reply 11 of 46
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by iPedro View Post


    While he may be in "excellent condition", the sad truth is that transplanted organs require a barrage of daily medication to prevent his body from rejecting the alien organ (alien as in not recognized by his system to be a natural part of his body).



    Transplanted livers can last in the best case scenario for up to 10 years. At that time, he will either require a new transplant or we'll have figured a way to reliably grow organs from a patients own DNA, meaning that he'll get a new liver that is his own.



    In the meantime, I'm sure Steve will begin preparing for his exit (which could still take years).



    Any man with the knowledge that his ilfe could end in 10 years or less would choose family over work. I expect Steve to work at Apple for the next 2 years at most and then perhaps retain a small role as a consultant for the company while he enjoys life with his wife, kids and friends.



    Really, according to the Center of Liver Disease and Transplantation, they say up towards 30 years:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by CLDT


    Q: How long will my liver transplant last?

    A: Liver transplant can have excellent outcomes. Recipients have been known to a normal life over 30 years after the operation.



    According to the most recent year computed UNOS/OPTN (2004) national average one-year graft survival at 83%, and patient survival at 87% for patients receiving a deceased donor liver and 92% for those transplanted with an organ from a living donor. Five-year graft and patient survivals are 67% (deceased/2000) 62% (living/2000) and 76% (deceased/2000) 81% (living/2000), respectively. During 2006 at New York Presbyterian, our one-year graft and patient survival rates are 82% and 88%.



    It is important to remember that many factors come into play with these statistics. They represent ALL patients transplanted, including the very old and the very young, those who were critically ill and those with less severe liver problems at the time of transplant.



    Transplant recipients directly contribute to the success of their transplant. Failure to comply with the immunosuppression medical regimen is the number one cause of organ failure. Close follow-up with your transplant team and primary-care physician can help ensure a good outcome. Careful attention to medication schedules, lifestyle changes, infection-avoidance techniques are all important ways to prolong one's life after transplantation.



  • Reply 12 of 46
    As far as I know from people who work in the transplant field, once cancer has metastasized or spread beyond the primary tumor, the disease is treatable, and not curable. In this context, people who have metastatic cancer are not eligible for transplants, possibly because the cancer has probably spread to other parts of the body in addition to the liver, and because their life expectancy won't be substantially helped by swapping a malignant organ out for a healthy one. Maybe this is cause for optimism, i.e., Steve Job's cancer has not metastasized. That would please me. I hear he's a mean dude, but he's one of the most important figures of his time in terms of teh positive impact he's had on culture and society. And he's not finished yet. Sick or no, I'm betting he still has a few great things to give to the world before he checks out.
  • Reply 13 of 46
    kibitzerkibitzer Posts: 1,114member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Evanitude View Post


    As far as I know from people who work in the transplant field, once cancer has metastasized or spread beyond the primary tumor, the disease is treatable, and not curable. In this context, people who have metastatic cancer are not eligible for transplants, possibly because the cancer has probably spread to other parts of the body in addition to the liver, and because their life expectancy won't be substantially helped by swapping a malignant organ out for a healthy one. Maybe this is cause for optimism, i.e., Steve Job's cancer has not metastasized. That would please me. I hear he's a mean dude, but he's one of the most important figures of his time in terms of teh positive impact he's had on culture and society. And he's not finished yet. Sick or no, I'm betting he still has a few great things to give to the world before he checks out.



    Again, please read agrothey's posts at the link below. He is a gastrointestinal medical oncologist and describes the unusual aspects of the cancer that Jobs has been fighting.



    http://forums.appleinsider.com/showt...threadid=99518
  • Reply 14 of 46
    dhkostadhkosta Posts: 150member
    It's certainly good to hear that he's doing well, and if he decides to retire soon, then good for him. The last five months have proven that he's built an organization that will thrive even in his absence, and he's done his part to make the world a better place. Most of us are fans of Apple here, and whether we're consumers or shareholders, he's more than done right by us. While I hope that he'll spend another decade or two at Apple, I'd be perfectly content knowing that the man who paved the way for the tech I enjoy daily is enjoying time with his family.



    While I maintain that his health is none of our business, it's certainly comforting to know that all is well.



    To your health, Steve Jobs!
  • Reply 15 of 46
    tt92618tt92618 Posts: 444member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by iPedro View Post


    While he may be in "excellent condition", the sad truth is that transplanted organs require a barrage of daily medication to prevent his body from rejecting the alien organ (alien as in not recognized by his system to be a natural part of his body).



    Transplanted livers can last in the best case scenario for up to 10 years. At that time, he will either require a new transplant or we'll have figured a way to reliably grow organs from a patients own DNA, meaning that he'll get a new liver that is his own.



    In the meantime, I'm sure Steve will begin preparing for his exit (which could still take years).



    Any man with the knowledge that his ilfe could end in 10 years or less would choose family over work. I expect Steve to work at Apple for the next 2 years at most and then perhaps retain a small role as a consultant for the company while he enjoys life with his wife, kids and friends.



    I keep seeing quite a few people throwing around this 10 year figure, and I personally am wondering where that comes from. Anybody with an interest can Google this, and if they do, they will find plenty of information to contradict that claim. For example, in a British study, life expectancy after liver transplant was a median of 22.2 years, with 95% of patients living between 19.3 and 25.6 years. That was compared to a median of 29 years for other patients. So, a 7 year difference, but far better than the 10 years people around here are suggesting. Jobs is 56. If he lives 20 years longer, he will be 76, and that is pretty good. If he makes it the median expectancy, he will be 78. If he makes it to the outside of that 95% confidence interval, he will be almost 82.



    I can't pretend to know what SJ will or will not do with his life and his time, but I think parading around announcing his imminent death, or some sort of 10 year limited warranty for his liver, is premature and also not very nice. If he makes it past 6 months without rejection, the odds are really good for him that he can go 20 years or more. But that's all just missing the point anyway. Shouldn't we just be wishing him well and saying 'thanks for the great work, hope you continue it, but if you don't, we certainly understand.'
  • Reply 16 of 46
    jbrunijbruni Posts: 29member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Evanitude View Post


    I hear he's a mean dude, ...



    Not mean. He has a short fuse when in the presence of incompetence.
  • Reply 17 of 46
    bugsnwbugsnw Posts: 717member
    I'm glad SJ was able to take advantage of our world-beating health care and possibly extend his productive years by a decade or more! I know his DNA is intertwined with Apple and hopefully he'll always have at least a consulting role as they pump out more great products in the years ahead.
  • Reply 18 of 46
    The news media is turning it into: "Now we know why Apple was building up such a huge cash reserve." Merely to guarantee that Steve Jobs would have been first in line for a liver transplant. if a billion dollars is missing from the cash reserve next quarter, we know where it went... Methodist University Hospital.\



    The media is not going to let this one go to rest anytime soon. This story is going to be used to manipulate Apple stock to the hilt. I wonder if it has enough power to maybe dissuade potential Apple product buyers by casting Steve and Apple in a bad light. Power of the press is a fairly scary thing. There is absolutely zero proof that Steve bought a liver, yet there will be plenty of speculation about how he got a transplant as soon as he did. Even if the waiting list was short in that region, they'll suspect something fishy. Hey, he could have just gotten lucky.



    Nobody is guaranteed how long their life is going to be even if it was the most perfect liver transplant in the world. He can still fall down the stairs or slip on a banana peel. Or be the one person that manages to get 30 more years out of his life by just sheer willpower. I really don't understand why the news media is saying things like, they're not sure if he can manage a full day's work or he's only got a few months to live. It's really just so annoying to hear the media put a time period on a human life. Why all this transplant talk should affect Apple's share price, I have no idea.
  • Reply 19 of 46
    rnp1rnp1 Posts: 175member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jbruni View Post


    Not mean. He has a short fuse when in the presence of incompetence.



    THAT MEANS WHEN VISITING THE BC STORE, HE ASKED THE PILOT TO FLY THE PLANE WAY AROUND REDMOND, SO HE WOULDN"T COMPLETELY EXPLODE IF HE SENSED THE PRESENCE OF STEVE BALMER!



    But seriously, what loyalty and stamina he has to return to work after all that. He can easily afford to stay home and just play with the kids. His input and ideas are just too important to us!
  • Reply 20 of 46
    mactrippermactripper Posts: 1,328member
    In other news,



    Quote:

    Steve Dowling, in charge of Apple's Corporate Public Relations, has spoken to a Reuters reporter Monday about a confidential matter concerning a brawl between the Phillip Schiller, Chief of Marketing and CEO Steve Jobs at Apple's Cupertino HQ campus.



    Phillip Schiller was blackened and bruised about the face with a slightly bloody nose and a cut lip.



    Asked what the brawl was about, a teary eyed Phil reportely replied "fsck you, I still like glossy screens" and stomped off in the direction of his car. The Reuters reporter noticed a shoe imprint on the buttocks portion of Phil's pants.




    http://www.reuters.com/apple/brawlatcupertino



Sign In or Register to comment.