Microsoft represents only serious competition for Apple hardware, Steve Ballmer says

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  • Reply 21 of 230
    tekmtekm Posts: 14member
    Steve, face palm, Balmer. Considering he's a large bag of fail, and everything that has come out of his mouth has been wrong... And MS has never had much success in hardware, I'm gonna file this I. The dismiss column
  • Reply 22 of 230
    chadbagchadbag Posts: 1,994member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post



    Btw, Microsoft was totally misleading when they said Surface Book was twice as fast as MBP. Normally when a company does comparisons it should be to the best the competiton has. They used Apple's 2012 non-retina MBP for comparison.



    http://tinyurl.com/om894x6



    Some PCMag or Znet guy did his own tests against a recent rMBP 13 inch and got 3x the speed for Surface Book for the graphics.  CPU was a wash with Apple slightly ahead.   But the discrete GPU blew away the Apple integrated one.

  • Reply 23 of 230
    At least Microsoft figured out that all screens must be touchable going forward even if it is only for occasional use. I have been holding off buying any mac laptops for years waiting for them to add a touch screen. I need it for my iOS app development. Currently you have to run on an external device when testing which is a real pain.
  • Reply 24 of 230
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    hattig wrote: »
    He's right, but mainly because the PC OEMs are simply really really bad at PC/Notebook/Tablet design.

    Microsoft at least appears to have a clue with the Surface Pro and Surface Book. And let's remember that this upturn in their skills came since Ballmer left the company.

    I still wouldn't trust Microsoft to simply turn around one day and kill the products and support for them. Zune, Kin, Plays For Sure, ...

    And yet Harry McCraken at Time had to return two Surface Book review units because of faulty hardware. And the machine kept crashing on the WSJ folks. I hate the way everyone is throwing PC OEMs under the bus. As if they designed crap products by choice. As if you can put a premium on commodity hardware and software and get people to buy it. I think Microsoft shares most of the blame here. And what's amusing is just this spring everyone was drooling over the Dell XPS 13 and it's near bezel free display. Now the tech meme is no one other than Microsoft can do premium hardware and all the OEMs suck.
  • Reply 25 of 230
    chadbagchadbag Posts: 1,994member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by GrangerFX View Post



    At least Microsoft figured out that all screens must be touchable going forward even if it is only for occasional use. I have been holding off buying any mac laptops for years waiting for them to add a touch screen. I need it for my iOS app development. Currently you have to run on an external device when testing which is a real pain.



    Really?  I rather use the external device.  I personally don't want a touch screen, even for iOS development.  I rarely use the emulator. 

     

    Apple won't do it just for iOS developers.   And they don't believe in it (been based over a bunch -- Bing or Google it).

  • Reply 26 of 230
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    chadbag wrote: »

    Some PCMag or Znet guy did his own tests against a recent rMBP 13 inch and got 3x the speed for Surface Book for the graphics.  CPU was a wash with Apple slightly ahead.   But the discrete GPU blew away the Apple integrated one.

    Wow a top of the line discrete GPU blew away an integrated Intel GPU. What a shock.
  • Reply 27 of 230
    chadbagchadbag Posts: 1,994member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post





    Wow a top of the line discrete GPU blew away an integrated Intel GPU. What a shock.



    For the price bracket and size, it is a fair comparison in terms of which performs better.  The customer doesn't care how that performance comes about.

     

    Now, most Mac users are not playing hard core games on their 13" rMBP and the 15" rMBP is the more professional device for people who need OpenCL performance for drafting, graphics, etc.   So in the end it is not that big of a deal for the normal customer.

  • Reply 28 of 230
    cwscws Posts: 59member
    I know this may not be a popular thing to say on this site, but I tend to agree with him that, in the long run, Microsoft will likely emerge as a strong competitor on both the software and hardware front. Google also. Both companies are very capable of developing a well integrated multi-platform software ecosystem. When it comes to hardware, they will copy Apple's innovations to stay competitive.
  • Reply 29 of 230



    The sweaty one thinks he's still relevant. 

  • Reply 29 of 230
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Cpsro View Post

     

    Once a dimwit, always a dimwit.




    Not bad for a $17 billion dimwit.

  • Reply 31 of 230
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by cws View Post



    I know this may not be a popular thing to say on this site, but I tend to agree with him that, in the long run, Microsoft will likely emerge as a strong competitor on both the software and hardware front. Google also. Both companies are very capable of developing a well integrated multi-platform software ecosystem. When it comes to hardware, they will copy Apple's innovations to stay competitive.

    Capability and execution are not one in the same.  

  • Reply 32 of 230
    For Microsoft, they need to recognize that competing against Apple just sets them up as a follower instead of simply focusing on making high quality, differentiated products and services. I'm happy to see them trying with products like the Surface Book, but when they focus on competing with Apple, instead of selling me on how I can use their products and why using their products makes more sense for me, I am unimpressed.

    The whole use-case for a touch-screen laptop makes zero sense to me. Frankly I cannot stand when people touch my 15" rMBP screen, when they're pointing at something on screen. And there is no point where moving your hand from keyboard to screen is natural or time saving - it's the opposite. It takes extra time and forces you to hold your arm and hand in the air in order to do something on-screen that could have been better done on the track pad.
  • Reply 33 of 230
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post



    Btw, Microsoft was totally misleading when they said Surface Book was twice as fast as MBP. Normally when a company does comparisons it should be to the best the competiton has. They used Apple's 2012 non-retina MBP for comparison.



    http://tinyurl.com/om894x6



    Yes and no. In CPU intensive tasks, the 13" rMBP can definitely keep up, and in some instances beat the SB. But given the addition of the dGPU in the SB, it handily wins in graphics intensive tasks.

  • Reply 34 of 230
    KIN. Never forget.

    Actually, if the Kin had been released as Allard originally envisioned it might not have been the bomb it was.

    http://www.engadget.com/2010/07/02/life-and-death-of-microsoft-kin-the-inside-story/
  • Reply 35 of 230
    jungmarkjungmark Posts: 6,926member
    Lay off the maryjane, Steve. It's messing with your mind.
  • Reply 36 of 230
    By the way, Steve Ballmer bought 4% of Twitter's stock. He could be the straw that broke the camel's back.
  • Reply 37 of 230
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post





    And yet Harry McCraken at Time had to return two Surface Book review units because of faulty hardware. And the machine kept crashing on the WSJ folks. I hate the way everyone is throwing PC OEMs under the bus. As if they designed crap products by choice. As if you can put a premium on commodity hardware and software and get people to buy it. I think Microsoft shares most of the blame here. And what's amusing is just this spring everyone was drooling over the Dell XPS 13 and it's near bezel free display. Now the tech meme is no one other than Microsoft can do premium hardware and all the OEMs suck.

    It's not so much that the PC OEM folks make crap products.  They're just not pushing the hardware forward in any meaningful way.

  • Reply 38 of 230
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by chadbag View Post

     



    For the price bracket and size, it is a fair comparison in terms of which performs better.  The customer doesn't care how that performance comes about.

     

    Now, most Mac users are not playing hard core games on their 13" rMBP and the 15" rMBP is the more professional device for people who need OpenCL performance for drafting, graphics, etc.   So in the end it is not that big of a deal for the normal customer.




    Good point. Speaking of the 15" rMBP, here's a comparison of the $2,500 15" rMBP vs a $2,700 version of the SB.  Not hard to guess which one wins

     

    https://fstoppers.com/gear/surface-book-vs-macbook-pro-15-macbook-twice-fast-93596?utm_content=buffer3ac7c&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

  • Reply 39 of 230
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 5,043member

    he is delutional as we all know, MS only does a portion of their hardware design by third parties and I am not talking about they user third parties parts, they actually contract other companies to design products for them. This is the reason many of MS Hardware products just suck, it is design by commitee and people who have no vested interest in the outcome.

  • Reply 40 of 230
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 10,557member

    But will Hollywood make a movie about him when he kicks the bucket?

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