Samsung Galaxy fire blamed in evacuation of Southwest flight

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in iPhone
Southwest Airlines evacuated 75 passengers from a flight preparing to take off from Louisville Airport in Kentucky after smoke from a Samsung Galaxy phone filled the cabin.




Galaxy Note 7




A report by NBC Bay Area News noted that all passengers and flight crew were safely removed from the 737 aircraft without injury, and that the airline worked to rebook customers on other flights.







The Samsung Galaxy fire occured ten minutes before the aircraft was scheduled to depart for Baltimore, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration noted.



The plane had already taxied across the tarmac and was preparing to take off, but returned to the gate after smoke was reported. The FAA has issued guidelines that specifically name Samsung Galaxy phones as a fire hazard that should not be plugged in or charged during flight.



The report cited passenger Misty Whitaker stating, "I was sitting at the front of the plane and I noticed a flight attendant coming quickly down the aisle saying, 'There's smoke on the plane. Leave all of your bags on the plane and come forward in an orderly fashion.' They said it was a Samsung Galaxy. The last they told us while we were waiting was that the fire had burned through the carpet."



Samsung first responded to reports of fires related to its Galaxy phone batteries in early September, and was urged by Consumer Reports to perform an official recall.



It took another two weeks before Samsung announced an official recall with the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, which asked American users to "immediately stop using and power down" the device and seek a replacement or refund. Samsung has issued recalls in other sales regions, including South Korea, but has attracted criticism for not recalling its dangerous product in China.



A report by the Wall Street Journal cited U.S. officials as saying that Samsung "appears to have exacerbated the situation in the way it has communicated with regulators and consumers," initially offering "conflicting information."
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 101
    If confirmed as a REPLACEMENT Note 7, which appears to be the case, this could be REAL bad for Samsung. 
    tmaybaconstangDeelronsockrolidcalichiazroger73kpomrepressthisjahblade
  • Reply 2 of 101
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 4,700member
    Okay, we can all laugh at the misfortune of that scumbag company.  Now, the reality of its danger is up front-and-center that joking about it is no longer an option.

    Our government needs to get involved NOW to ensure that Samsung not only pays dearly for their stupidity, but to make sure that the next Galaxy phone does not in fact explode in-flight and result in casualties.

    Enough of the joking around.  Get on it Obama.  

    Fucking Samsung.  They should be fined into oblivion.

    There has been whispers/rumors about Samsung's replacement Galaxy phones having the same exposing issues as the recalled models.  I wonder which camp this Galaxy phone fell in.

    tmaypscooter63sockrolidcalimagman1979kpomrepressthisradster360anantksundaramjahblade
  • Reply 3 of 101
    NY1822NY1822 Posts: 601member
    Other articles online are stating this was a replacement phone, deemed to be safe by Samsung.
    tmaysockrolidcalikpomrepressthislolliverwatto_cobranetmagejony0applepieguy
  • Reply 4 of 101
    SoliSoli Posts: 9,270member
    NY1822 said:
    Other articles online are stating this was a replacement phone, deemed to be safe by Samsung.
    Even if it was, if the airline still had a stated policy of Galaxy phones being turned off and unplugged, then the passenger could be held responsible by Southwest and the other passengers.
    baconstangsockrolidcalirepressthislolliverbrucemcwatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 101
    sog35 said:
    This is friken RIDICULOUS.

    All Samsung phones need to be confiscated from all flights. PERIOD.

    They need to be collected and stored in an air tight/fire proof safe for the entire flight.


    These phones are as dangerous as dynamite. 
    Why the HELL is the govt not doing anything?
    No, they should be collected, smashed, and recycled, therefore out of their owners missery, we should then have a support group that helps the former owners learn to make better choices...
    sockrolidcalimagman1979repressthislolliverwatto_cobraredgeminipaapplepieguy
  • Reply 6 of 101
    Not Good 
    magman1979newtonrjrepressthislolliverapplepieguy
  • Reply 7 of 101
    Soli said:
    NY1822 said:
    Other articles online are stating this was a replacement phone, deemed to be safe by Samsung.
    Even if it was, if the airline still had a stated policy of Galaxy phones being turned off and unplugged, then the passenger could be held responsible by Southwest and the other passengers.
    The phone was off and unplugged according to the owner. But if the battery was already melting down that wouldn't stop it.
    edited October 2016 SolicaliDeelronmagman1979repressthislolliverronnmacky the mackywatto_cobraredgeminipa
  • Reply 8 of 101
    NY1822NY1822 Posts: 601member
    Soli said:
    NY1822 said:
    Other articles online are stating this was a replacement phone, deemed to be safe by Samsung.
    Even if it was, if the airline still had a stated policy of Galaxy phones being turned off and unplugged, then the passenger could be held responsible by Southwest and the other passengers.
    agreed...my point was more to show the ineptitude of Samsung
    Solisockrolidcalirepressthislollivermacky the mackywatto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 101
    Terrorists' new 'device of choice'.
    Easy to smuggle on board.  More effective than exploding shoes or underwear.
    calimacseekerpeterhartwatto_cobramobiusredgeminipa
  • Reply 10 of 101
    SoliSoli Posts: 9,270member
    Soli said:
    NY1822 said:
    Other articles online are stating this was a replacement phone, deemed to be safe by Samsung.
    Even if it was, if the airline still had a stated policy of Galaxy phones being turned off and unplugged, then the passenger could be held responsible by Southwest and the other passengers.
    The phone was off and unplugged according to the owner. But if the battery was already melting down that wouldn't stop it.
    So the included pic in the article is AI's typical grab from Google Images without any consideration for presenting the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth?
    ronniqatedo
  • Reply 11 of 101
    512ke512ke Posts: 782member
    "Sarah Green of New Albany told The Courier-Journal of Louisville that her husband, Brian, was waiting to take off to Baltimore when his Galaxy Note 7 overheated. He called her from another person's phone a little after 9 a.m. to tell her what happened.

    "He said he had just powered it down, when it made a popping noise and started smoking," Sarah Green said. "He took it out of his pocket and threw it on the ground."

    Green said her husband's phone was a replacement Galaxy Note 7 after Samsung recalled the phone in mid-September because of "serious fire and burn hazards." They took the phone in about two weeks to a local AT&T Store to have it replaced."


    It's not enough to require people to power down their Galaxy Note 7's! 

    These dangerous devices have no place on commercial or private flights!

    sockrolidcalichiarepressthislollivergilly33brucemcwatto_cobramobiusnetmage
  • Reply 12 of 101
    SoliSoli Posts: 9,270member

    NY1822 said:
    Soli said:
    NY1822 said:
    Other articles online are stating this was a replacement phone, deemed to be safe by Samsung.
    Even if it was, if the airline still had a stated policy of Galaxy phones being turned off and unplugged, then the passenger could be held responsible by Southwest and the other passengers.
    agreed...my point was more to show the ineptitude of Samsung
    I didn't mean to discount your point, just jumping onto your conversation as another area where blame may be placed, but @thewhitefalcon's comment makes me think that the photo isn't from the plane.

  • Reply 13 of 101
    NY1822NY1822 Posts: 601member
    the funny thing is Samsung stock price is near an all time high...but apple stock has 3% swings from a fake German report of slowing iphone sales that no one ever read...
    sockrolidDeelroncalichiaanantksundaramlolliverwatto_cobramobiusbadmonk
  • Reply 14 of 101
    feacofeaco Posts: 9member
    The fact that another Galaxy Note 7 caught fire does not surprise me. However I am surprised that there were only 75 passengers on the flight. This is not like the flights I have been on lately.
    lolliverdaren_mitchell
  • Reply 15 of 101
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 4,700member
    Of course, it was only a matter of time before someone took advantage of this.  I couldn't stop laughing.

    http://www.digitaltrends.com/gaming/exploding-samsung-galaxy-note-7-grand-theft-auto/
    sockrolidjahbladewatto_cobrabadmonkpscooter63
  • Reply 16 of 101
    This business will get out of control. It will get out of control, and we'll be lucky to live through it.
    ncil49tmaysockrolidcalianton zuykov
  • Reply 17 of 101
    A fine and jail time is appropriate for anyone who knowingly (intentionally) takes a Note 7 or other banned incendiary device onto a passenger airliner. A crash would result in massive loss of life plus huge economic damages. Treating such issues in a cavalier manner is a crime against humanity. .
    sockrolidcalilollivergilly33watto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 101
    boredumbboredumb Posts: 1,416member
    NY1822 said:
    Other articles online are stating this was a replacement phone, deemed to be safe by Samsung.
    There are plenty of perfectly safe replacement phones...
    at the Apple Store.
    Solisockrolidmagman1979calimacseekerkpompeterhartanton zuykovlollivermacky the macky
  • Reply 19 of 101
    ncil49ncil49 Posts: 30member
    This business will get out of control. It will get out of control, and we'll be lucky to live through it.
    Long live Fred Thompson.  Probably would have been a good Prez.   Top 10 movie in general too.
    thewhitefalconpscooter63
  • Reply 20 of 101
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 3,170member
    boredumb said:
    NY1822 said:
    Other articles online are stating this was a replacement phone, deemed to be safe by Samsung.
    There are plenty of perfectly safe replacement phones...
    at the Apple Store.
    "Green’s Note 7 is in the hands of the Louisville Fire Department’s arson unit for investigation. He has already replaced it with an iPhone 7."

    http://www.theverge.com/2016/10/5/13175000/samsung-galaxy-note-7-fire-replacement-plane-battery-southwest
    calisockrolidlolliver
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