danvm

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danvm
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  • Microsoft unveils Surface Laptop Studio, Surface Pro 8, Surface Duo 2

    AppleZulu said:
    Roderikus said:
    Interesting form factors. So sad to see  being absent in this arena
    MS Surface has yet to create a compelling case for Apple to look at it and say, we should be doing that! 
    If you ask me, Apple saw something in the Surface Pro 4, considering it copied many elements for the iPad Pro. 
    Windows is a bloatware OS designed to run everything from a tablet to a power workstation, and on every possible configuration of third-party hardware out there. It does all that, but at a real cost to agility, security, and reliability. 

    For Apple to be present "in this arena," they would either have to make iOS/iPadOS able to run a $30,000 rack-mount Mac Pro, or they would have to alter MacOS to include an additional, entirely different touch UI that will run both on that workstation and on an iPad mini. I can assure you, doing that for the sole purpose of capturing a small market segment that just has to have a tablet/notebook hybrid would not be a wise or beneficial move.

    I think Apple is, to a some degree, present in the 2-in-1 devices arena, when you consider the iPad Pro with Magic Keyboard works very similar to a touchscreen notebook, but with the benefits and limitations of iPadOS.

    narwhal
  • Apple gives 11 reasons why business users should choose Mac

    mcdave said:
    lkrupp said:
    Nothing lasts forever, not even Windows’ dominance in business. Why some assume Windows will dominate forever is strange. Linux rules the server world. Who’s to say Apple can’t continue to grow in the enterprise?
    Windows’ dominance in IT has little to do with product capability and everything to do with practice  & job preservation.
    I think Windows dominance in IT has to do with product capability.  There is no other company with the enterprise / business ecosystem that MS have.  I understand when people have Apple products because of how well they integrate.  The same can be said of MS, and how well their ecosystem integrate.  I can see why IT people still with MS for the business / enterprises.      
    muthuk_vanalingamIreneW
  • Apple explains why getting iPhone apps outside the App Store is a bad idea

    nicholfd said:
    danvm said:
    nicholfd said:
    danvm said:
    nicholfd said:
    danvm said:
    nicholfd said:
    danvm said:
    AppleZulu said:
    danvm said:
    THANK YOU APPLE - For Finally Laying that Out!

    The Libertarian / Free to do whatever I want crowd always tends to ignore the consequences of their actions.

    In this case, Apple's review and oversight of apps adds stability and security to my iPhone that I simply cannot get any other way.   So again, Thank You Apple.

    Some might argue:  Well give the user the Choice!   But that's another bullshit argument.
    Once Apple allows sideloading, more and more vendors will simply avoid the hassle and expense of going through the app store -- and iOS will become as porous, unreliable and insecure as Android or Windows.

    While some might scream:  "Don't take away my free choice!"
    I say:   "Don't take away my reliability and security!"
    If that Apple App store si so good for developers, as Apple have been saying, there is no reason for them to leave the App Store, don't you think?  

    BTW, you forgot to add macOS in the list of "unreliable and insecure",
    https://appleinsider.com/articles/21/05/19/craig-federighi-blasts-mac-security-to-prop-up-ios-app-store
    Developers want Apple's customers, but many don't want Apple's rules. Because Apple doesn't pursue the low-end hardware market, their customers are more lucrative than average. So developers will currently go through the hoops to get into Apple's App store. That does not mean that if they were given the option to sidestep that process and those requirements that they wouldn't choose to do that. The fact that Epic, Facebook and others are spending big money on disingenuous PR campaigns and lawsuits is clear evidence that they want to be on Apple's platform, but they would greatly prefer to bypass the App Store and be free to scrape user data and collect user fees without abiding by Apple's rules or paying Apple's cut for access to a curated, more lucrative customer base.

    If given the option, many developers would bypass the app store in a heartbeat if they could. 

    So, for instance, millions of iPhone users currently have the Facebook app loaded on their iPhone, and they can (and do) choose to say no to Facebook's request to track them through that app and across the internet in order to package and sell the resulting data. The moment Apple is forced to allow side-loading of apps outside the App Store, Facebook will be out, and millions of iPhone users will have to either quit Facebook or succumb to Facebook's undisclosed data mining practices. 

    So yes, there are plenty of reasons for developers to leave the App Store, and few or none of them are actually good for consumers.
    Again, if the App Store is so good for developers and customers as Apple said, most developers, will stay in the App Store.  If Facebook decides to go out of the app store that's a win for customers, don't you think?  ;)
    Nope - it's a los for the customers who get Facebook someplace else without the security & privacy the Apple App Store provides.
    Agree.  That's an example on why most of the time I wouldn't go outside of the app store if, for some reason, Apple open iOS for side load apps.  

    At the same time, it's not always about privacy and security.  One example are streaming game services, like Xbox GamePass w/ Cloud Gaming.  Sometime Apple create nonsense rules that block good services.  I don't think I would have any privacy or security issues side loading the Xbox Cloud Gaming app.  
    You can't know that.  What if it's a "knock-off" you get by accident (and all the problems that would come with)?  What if Microsoft decides to rape your private info, without telling you?
    An Xbox / GamePass customer already gave the information to MS, the same way many customers do with Google, Netflix, Amazon and Spotify, among other developers.  How is Apple protecting my private info if I already gave it to MS or any other developer?  They already know my preferences from the things I play, watch and buy.  Do you think that Apple should remove those app since they cannot completely control customers privacy?

    Again, sometimes Apple create nonsense rules that block valid services, as GamesPass Cloud Gaming.  It's not always about privacy and security.  And I would have no issues side loading the Xbox Cloud Gaming app if it's possible.  Completely different from a company like Facebook.  
    But Apple makes them *tell* you what they are doing with that data.  What about a rogue app (imposter you accidentally installed)?
    Would it make any difference, considering the customer trusted the developer enough to gave his data?  

    Rouge apps is a different story, and I 'm aware that the App Store is the safest way to install apps.  But to think that every side loaded app could compromise the security and privacy is not true at all.  When Apple blocked the Xbox Cloud Gaming app, it was about how the app worked and not about security or privacy.  If there was a  possibility to side load that app, it would not compromised the device security or privacy, at least based in the reasons Apple gave to reject the app. 
    Sure it was - each game in the cloud gaming app was required to inform the user of the data it collected, and how it would use it, and allow the user to opt out.  Apple could not enforce it within the Xbox Cloud Gaming app.  Apple then offered to allow the cloud gaming, as long as each game in it was "listed" separately in Apple's App Store so they could enforce this.  Microsoft declined.
    Schiller recently explained why cloud gaming wasn't allowed in iOS devices, Apple wants to assign an age rating, parental controls, app designation, privacy policies and other attributes on a per-app basis.  I find interesting that Apple don't requires that from movie and music services, and I suppose it's because they are already rated by MPAA.  But the same can be said of Game Pass games that already rated by  ESRB / PEGI.  Also Game Pass have parental controls.  

    Like you said, privacy was an issue, and not necessarily because Game Pass was not safe or violated Apple privacy policies (at least Apple didn't made any comment about that).  So Apple decided to block cloud gaming.  This is an example of an app being rejected, even though is from a reliable developer (in this case MS), where customer trust their data and privacy data.  Don't you think that would be nice for those customer to side load the Game Pass app?  I think so.  Maybe this could be the case for other apps too.
    muthuk_vanalingamelijahg
  • Apple explains why getting iPhone apps outside the App Store is a bad idea

    nicholfd said:
    danvm said:
    nicholfd said:
    danvm said:
    nicholfd said:
    danvm said:
    AppleZulu said:
    danvm said:
    THANK YOU APPLE - For Finally Laying that Out!

    The Libertarian / Free to do whatever I want crowd always tends to ignore the consequences of their actions.

    In this case, Apple's review and oversight of apps adds stability and security to my iPhone that I simply cannot get any other way.   So again, Thank You Apple.

    Some might argue:  Well give the user the Choice!   But that's another bullshit argument.
    Once Apple allows sideloading, more and more vendors will simply avoid the hassle and expense of going through the app store -- and iOS will become as porous, unreliable and insecure as Android or Windows.

    While some might scream:  "Don't take away my free choice!"
    I say:   "Don't take away my reliability and security!"
    If that Apple App store si so good for developers, as Apple have been saying, there is no reason for them to leave the App Store, don't you think?  

    BTW, you forgot to add macOS in the list of "unreliable and insecure",
    https://appleinsider.com/articles/21/05/19/craig-federighi-blasts-mac-security-to-prop-up-ios-app-store
    Developers want Apple's customers, but many don't want Apple's rules. Because Apple doesn't pursue the low-end hardware market, their customers are more lucrative than average. So developers will currently go through the hoops to get into Apple's App store. That does not mean that if they were given the option to sidestep that process and those requirements that they wouldn't choose to do that. The fact that Epic, Facebook and others are spending big money on disingenuous PR campaigns and lawsuits is clear evidence that they want to be on Apple's platform, but they would greatly prefer to bypass the App Store and be free to scrape user data and collect user fees without abiding by Apple's rules or paying Apple's cut for access to a curated, more lucrative customer base.

    If given the option, many developers would bypass the app store in a heartbeat if they could. 

    So, for instance, millions of iPhone users currently have the Facebook app loaded on their iPhone, and they can (and do) choose to say no to Facebook's request to track them through that app and across the internet in order to package and sell the resulting data. The moment Apple is forced to allow side-loading of apps outside the App Store, Facebook will be out, and millions of iPhone users will have to either quit Facebook or succumb to Facebook's undisclosed data mining practices. 

    So yes, there are plenty of reasons for developers to leave the App Store, and few or none of them are actually good for consumers.
    Again, if the App Store is so good for developers and customers as Apple said, most developers, will stay in the App Store.  If Facebook decides to go out of the app store that's a win for customers, don't you think?  ;)
    Nope - it's a los for the customers who get Facebook someplace else without the security & privacy the Apple App Store provides.
    Agree.  That's an example on why most of the time I wouldn't go outside of the app store if, for some reason, Apple open iOS for side load apps.  

    At the same time, it's not always about privacy and security.  One example are streaming game services, like Xbox GamePass w/ Cloud Gaming.  Sometime Apple create nonsense rules that block good services.  I don't think I would have any privacy or security issues side loading the Xbox Cloud Gaming app.  
    You can't know that.  What if it's a "knock-off" you get by accident (and all the problems that would come with)?  What if Microsoft decides to rape your private info, without telling you?
    An Xbox / GamePass customer already gave the information to MS, the same way many customers do with Google, Netflix, Amazon and Spotify, among other developers.  How is Apple protecting my private info if I already gave it to MS or any other developer?  They already know my preferences from the things I play, watch and buy.  Do you think that Apple should remove those app since they cannot completely control customers privacy?

    Again, sometimes Apple create nonsense rules that block valid services, as GamesPass Cloud Gaming.  It's not always about privacy and security.  And I would have no issues side loading the Xbox Cloud Gaming app if it's possible.  Completely different from a company like Facebook.  
    But Apple makes them *tell* you what they are doing with that data.  What about a rogue app (imposter you accidentally installed)?
    Would it make any difference, considering the customer trusted the developer enough to gave his data?  

    Rouge apps is a different story, and I 'm aware that the App Store is the safest way to install apps.  But to think that every side loaded app could compromise the security and privacy is not true at all.  When Apple blocked the Xbox Cloud Gaming app, it was about how the app worked and not about security or privacy.  If there was a  possibility to side load that app, it would not compromised the device security or privacy, at least based in the reasons Apple gave to reject the app. 
    elijahg
  • Apple explains why getting iPhone apps outside the App Store is a bad idea

    nicholfd said:
    danvm said:
    nicholfd said:
    danvm said:
    AppleZulu said:
    danvm said:
    THANK YOU APPLE - For Finally Laying that Out!

    The Libertarian / Free to do whatever I want crowd always tends to ignore the consequences of their actions.

    In this case, Apple's review and oversight of apps adds stability and security to my iPhone that I simply cannot get any other way.   So again, Thank You Apple.

    Some might argue:  Well give the user the Choice!   But that's another bullshit argument.
    Once Apple allows sideloading, more and more vendors will simply avoid the hassle and expense of going through the app store -- and iOS will become as porous, unreliable and insecure as Android or Windows.

    While some might scream:  "Don't take away my free choice!"
    I say:   "Don't take away my reliability and security!"
    If that Apple App store si so good for developers, as Apple have been saying, there is no reason for them to leave the App Store, don't you think?  

    BTW, you forgot to add macOS in the list of "unreliable and insecure",
    https://appleinsider.com/articles/21/05/19/craig-federighi-blasts-mac-security-to-prop-up-ios-app-store
    Developers want Apple's customers, but many don't want Apple's rules. Because Apple doesn't pursue the low-end hardware market, their customers are more lucrative than average. So developers will currently go through the hoops to get into Apple's App store. That does not mean that if they were given the option to sidestep that process and those requirements that they wouldn't choose to do that. The fact that Epic, Facebook and others are spending big money on disingenuous PR campaigns and lawsuits is clear evidence that they want to be on Apple's platform, but they would greatly prefer to bypass the App Store and be free to scrape user data and collect user fees without abiding by Apple's rules or paying Apple's cut for access to a curated, more lucrative customer base.

    If given the option, many developers would bypass the app store in a heartbeat if they could. 

    So, for instance, millions of iPhone users currently have the Facebook app loaded on their iPhone, and they can (and do) choose to say no to Facebook's request to track them through that app and across the internet in order to package and sell the resulting data. The moment Apple is forced to allow side-loading of apps outside the App Store, Facebook will be out, and millions of iPhone users will have to either quit Facebook or succumb to Facebook's undisclosed data mining practices. 

    So yes, there are plenty of reasons for developers to leave the App Store, and few or none of them are actually good for consumers.
    Again, if the App Store is so good for developers and customers as Apple said, most developers, will stay in the App Store.  If Facebook decides to go out of the app store that's a win for customers, don't you think?  ;)
    Nope - it's a los for the customers who get Facebook someplace else without the security & privacy the Apple App Store provides.
    Agree.  That's an example on why most of the time I wouldn't go outside of the app store if, for some reason, Apple open iOS for side load apps.  

    At the same time, it's not always about privacy and security.  One example are streaming game services, like Xbox GamePass w/ Cloud Gaming.  Sometime Apple create nonsense rules that block good services.  I don't think I would have any privacy or security issues side loading the Xbox Cloud Gaming app.  
    You can't know that.  What if it's a "knock-off" you get by accident (and all the problems that would come with)?  What if Microsoft decides to rape your private info, without telling you?
    An Xbox / GamePass customer already gave the information to MS, the same way many customers do with Google, Netflix, Amazon and Spotify, among other developers.  How is Apple protecting my private info if I already gave it to MS or any other developer?  They already know my preferences from the things I play, watch and buy.  Do you think that Apple should remove those app since they cannot completely control customers privacy?

    Again, sometimes Apple create nonsense rules that block valid services, as GamesPass Cloud Gaming.  It's not always about privacy and security.  And I would have no issues side loading the Xbox Cloud Gaming app if it's possible.  Completely different from a company like Facebook.  
    gatorguyelijahg