God Bless America

brbr
Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
I was recently told that removing god from the national motto, the coin, and from public speeches made by the representative of the nation would simply be appeasing 14% of the population at the expense of the other 86%. I disagree. Basically what this is saying is "our country can only represent you as long as you believe in some sort of god...i'll back off and won't force you to believe in the christian god but you better believe in some kind of god!"



The original motto was "E Pluribus Unum." This means "From Many, One." This was the driving force behind the self-improvement of our great nation until the McCarthy era when it was changed from a uniting phrase to a specifically divisive one: "In God We Trust." No, We, as in the whole of America, don't. Now, don't bother arguing that "In God We Trust" is not divisive. It was specifically designed to divide or separate ourselves from the goldess commy bastards.



However, such a phrase goes against everything the founding fathers would have wanted. Instead of a phrase talking about no matter what our petty differences may be, we are still one country and that makes us strong, our motto is now a phrase that says you're only a real american if you believe in some sort of invisible man that lives in the sky (or earth or fire...we're real tolerant these days as to where this guy lives).



As long as we have the current motto, we are America Divided. BRING BACK E PLURIBUS UNUM AND ONCE AGAIN WE CAN BE AN AMERICA UNITED.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 139
    alcimedesalcimedes Posts: 5,486member
    sounds like a plan.



    write to your representative.



  • Reply 2 of 139
    guarthoguartho Posts: 1,208member
    BR, are you happy?
  • Reply 3 of 139
    brbr Posts: 8,395member
    [quote]Originally posted by Guartho:

    <strong>BR, are you happy?</strong><hr></blockquote>



    Yes, quite. I'm tired of these stupid stereotypes insisting that I can't disagree with a certain policies that relate to religion unless I'm somehow unhappy.
  • Reply 4 of 139
    709709 Posts: 2,016member
    I personally think that each time we elect a new president, their 3 initials should replace the GOD on all our currency. 'In GWB We Trust'. That's much more unifying, don't you think?
  • Reply 5 of 139
    brbr Posts: 8,395member
    [quote]Originally posted by 709:

    <strong>I personally think that each time we elect a new president, their 3 initials should replace the GOD on all our currency. 'In GWB We Trust'. That's much more unifying, don't you think?</strong><hr></blockquote>



    Well, technically the country does have to put its trust in the president...however...it probably would be even more divisive than the current motto. Just keep E Pluribus Unum on the coins and reinstate it as our National Motto. Ditch the trust crap.
  • Reply 6 of 139
    der kopfder kopf Posts: 2,275member
    How about 'In der Kopf we trust' ?



    Or some arbitrary other soul. The opposite maybe. 'In groverat we trust'.
  • Reply 7 of 139
    709709 Posts: 2,016member
    [quote]Originally posted by BR:

    <strong>



    Well, technically the country does have to put its trust in the president...however...it probably would be even more divisive than the current motto.</strong><hr></blockquote>



    Good George, BR, I was kidding. Never underestimate the power of a smiley I guess.



    I completely agree with you on this. Get a petition going and I'll be the first to sign.
  • Reply 8 of 139
    brbr Posts: 8,395member
    [quote]Originally posted by der Kopf:

    <strong>How about 'In der Kopf we trust' ?</strong><hr></blockquote>

    Hmm...that's actually quite intriguing
  • Reply 9 of 139
    guarthoguartho Posts: 1,208member
    [quote]Originally posted by BR:

    <strong>



    Yes, quite. I'm tired of these stupid stereotypes insisting that I can't disagree with a certain policies that relate to religion unless I'm somehow unhappy.</strong><hr></blockquote>



    Just curious. In fact, I was asking in order to clear up said stereo-type. (For me that is, not as some kind of proof for all)



    [ 02-03-2003: Message edited by: Guartho ]</p>
  • Reply 10 of 139
    toweltowel Posts: 1,479member
    [quote]However, such a phrase goes against everything the founding fathers would have wanted.<hr></blockquote>



    BR, the Founding Fathers firmly believed that the nation they created was a vehicle of a higher power. They were enamoured with the idea of the US as the New Jerusalem, the City on a Hill. They started every session of the Constitutional Convention with a prayer for guidance. In fact, religion was such a pervasive part of thought and life then that it would only be truly remarkable if they didn't see things through God-colored glasses. What is true, of course, is that they didn't necessarily subscribe to the traditional Protestant-nee-Baptist view of things. Many of them were more Diests (God-as-watchmaker) than Christians. I think it's better to think of the God in "In God We Trust" as the Higher Power of AA, rather than the God of the New Testament. But to deny that our nation was founded in such spirituality is to deny an essential part of our heritage.
  • Reply 11 of 139
    guarthoguartho Posts: 1,208member
    Ah yes... American History lessons are coming back to me... wait for it... wait for it... There it is.



    Yes, I seem to remember that the main precept of separation of church and state is simply that no organized church should have direct influence on the government, and that the government should not hold one faith above others. Certainly a far cry from "God and anything having to do with him should be cut out of government and anything having to do with it."



    (I do not mean to attribute the previous quote to BR, or to say that he even agrees with it, Just summing up the prevailing attitude today)
  • Reply 12 of 139
    kickahakickaha Posts: 8,760member
    Ah, but the great thing about the passage of time is that we can progress.



    The country was founded during a time when the only religions of note to the Fathers were all various sects of Christianity. Things are a little more complex now.



    Would you feel as cozy if the motto were "In Allah we Trust"? I mean, really, if 'God' just means *any* 'higher power', then Allah should work as well, right? After all, the translation is exactly the same...



    I'd sign the 'E Pluribus, Unum' petition in a *heartbeat*. It indicates that *we*, humanity, acting in concert as one, are strong. I don't think anyone can argue against that...
  • Reply 13 of 139
    "I never will, by any word or act, bow to the shrine of intolerance or admit a right of inquiry into the religious opinions of others." --Thomas Jefferson 1803



    gee wasn't he a founding father?
  • Reply 14 of 139
    thegeldingthegelding Posts: 3,230member
    what's this "we" shit....me, me, ME!!! that is what it's all about...'In thegelding we trus...'Don't tread on thegelding'....'E Pluribus, thegelding'.....



    g



    sorry, my god complex is showing again...back to therapy i go....
  • Reply 15 of 139
    noahjnoahj Posts: 4,502member
    [quote]Originally posted by Kickaha:

    <strong>Would you feel as cozy if the motto were "In Allah we Trust"? I mean, really, if 'God' just means *any* 'higher power', then Allah should work as well, right? After all, the translation is exactly the same...</strong><hr></blockquote>



    No it is not the same. I will persue this argument no further though.
  • Reply 16 of 139
    buonrottobuonrotto Posts: 6,368member
    I have always liked "E Pluribus Unum" a lot more than "In God We Trust" -- it somehow just strikes a chord with me.



    For that matter, I like America the Beautiful a lot more than God Bless America or The Star Spangled Banner. I wish it were our national anthem.



    I liked our older paper bills even if they were neo-classical. They sure do beat the current neither-modren-nor-classical-nor-much-of-anything paper moeny we have now.



    And finally, I like Richard Bulfinch's Capitol dome a lot more than the over-scaled, overly-opulent St. Peter's rip-off we have now.
  • Reply 17 of 139
    thegeldingthegelding Posts: 3,230member
    to muslum-americans, 'In God We Trust' does mean 'In Allah We Trust'.....to christian-americans 'In God We Trust' means 'In God We Trust' since i don't think christians like being on a first name basis with God...to athesist-americans 'In God We Trust' is a saying on money and bank walls....no biggie....as an athesist i trust god, he/she hasn't borrowed money from me and not paid me back, he/she hasn't borrowed my car and wrecked it, i haven't caught him/her cheating with my wife...so all is cool between god and me....g
  • Reply 18 of 139
    Guys, guys, guys, have a little place in your monotheistic hearts for polytheists. We're people too!
  • Reply 19 of 139
    [quote]to athesist-americans 'In God We Trust' is a saying on money and bank walls....no biggie.... <hr></blockquote>



    i disagree, but i'm tolerant of folks who want to believe in virgin births, prophets flying through the air, imaginary friends etc.
  • Reply 20 of 139
    I thought Athesists were in fact polytheists.
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