iOS 6.1 sees 22% adoption in less than two days, could be fastest ever

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
After launching on Monday, iOS 6.1 is already being used by nearly 22 percent of users monitored by one Web content firm, setting up Apple's newest mobile OS update to be the most quickly adopted to date.

iOS 6.1


Data collected by Onswipe, a web content creation company, shows that as of 3 p.m. EST Wednesday, iOS 6.1 has been adopted by 21.81 percent of about 13 million iOS users observed from sites using the firm's technology, reports TechCrunch. The adoption rate has been strong, going from 11.35 percent in the first 24 hours of availability to 16.92 percent earlier today.

Breaking down updates by device, the iPhone was at 23.92 percent, while the iPad peaked at a slightly lower 20.90 percent. The overall 21.81 percent adoption factors in all iOS devices including the iPod touch.

In comparison to iOS 6.1, Onswipe saw Apple's last update, the major version change to iOS 6, take an entire week to penetrate 44.58 percent of the installed user base. The company's CEO Jason Baptiste attributes the spike in adoption to customer familiarity with Apple's over-the-air update system that debuted with iOS 5 in 2011.

Wednesday's report is in line with data gathered by other firms like Chitika, which estimated that iOS 6 saw a 15 percent adoption rate after 24 hours, but took over a month to surpass 60 percent.

When the newest iOS update was released on Monday, Apple's Senior Vice President of Worldwide Marketing Philip Schiller noted that iOS 6 is now running on 300 million iPhone, iPad and iPod touch devices after being available for only five months.

"It may be the most popular new version of an OS in history," he said.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 95
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    47.6% are still on all of Android version 2.3. The last Gingerbread update was released 2 years ago.

    It's been 10 months since the very last ICS update and yet version 4.0.x still totals only 9%. All of Jelly Bean — not just the latest point update from November 27, 2012 — only totals 10.2%.

    This has to be rough on developers that are tying to actually make a good product.

    [IMG ALT=""]http://forums.appleinsider.com/content/type/61/id/19923/width/500/height/1000[/IMG]



    edit: typos
  • Reply 2 of 95
    andreyandrey Posts: 108member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post



    47.6% are still on Android version 2.3.x. The last Gingerbread update was released 2 years ago. It's been 10 months since the very last ICS update and yet version 4.0.x still totals only 9%. All of Jelly Bean — not just the latest point update from November 27, 2012 — only totals 1.2%.


     


          Wasn't this article about iOS? 

  • Reply 3 of 95
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    andrey wrote: »
          Wasn't this article about iOS? 

    Yes, and I'm contrasting the two.
  • Reply 4 of 95
    andrey wrote: »
    Wasn't this article about iOS? 

    True... but Apple does not live in a vacuum.

    It's good to keep tabs on the competition. Lots of stuff happening out there. I enjoyed the Blackberry article today too.

    Smartphone OS adoption rate of all platforms is interesting as well.
  • Reply 5 of 95
    andreyandrey Posts: 108member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post





    Yes, and I'm contrasting the two.


     


    This comparison by version numbers means nothing. Android is used by many manufacturers and has completely different adoption pattern.

  • Reply 6 of 95
    philboogiephilboogie Posts: 7,435member
    Excellent graph to post, [B]Solipsism[/B]. I think the high adoption rate to upgrades is also a result for the delta updates we now have. That, and the fact that the process is so smooth and simply always works I don't even bother to do updates at home, backing up first, clean reboot and all that. Nope, just install the update.

    OT: I wonder how these phones from 2009 are doing. Will the latches from their SD Card slot have broken off and such? Removable battery not removable anymore? [COLOR=FFFFFF]OT, just in case some1 whines over this[/COLOR]
  • Reply 7 of 95
    philboogiephilboogie Posts: 7,435member
    andrey wrote: »
    This comparison by version numbers means nothing. Android is used by many manufacturers and has completely different adoption pattern.

    And that is one of the reasons why developers choose iOS, there's simply way less incentive to code for Android.
  • Reply 8 of 95
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    andrey wrote: »
    This comparison by version numbers means nothing. Android is used by many manufacturers and has completely different adoption pattern.

    Your reasons why it means nothing are exactly why it means everything.

    philboogie wrote: »
    Excellent graph to post, Solipsism. I think the high adoption rate to upgrades is also a result for the delta updates we now have. That, and the fact that the process is so smooth and simply always works I don't even bother to do updates at home, backing up first, clean reboot and all that. Nope, just install the update.

    I'd say OTA updates, delta updates, the device letting you know there is an update, the congruency of having all iDevices that can update be updatable at the same time making it much more well known to the average user, the growth rate* of the platform with new devices that can all get the same update, and supporting devices with the newest update for 3 full generations (in most cases) really help make this a solid platform and ecosystem that has no equal.



    * Apple has previous stated that each new iPhone model outsells all previous iPhone models before it. I would imagine that's also true for the iPad.
  • Reply 9 of 95
    andreyandrey Posts: 108member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post





    And that is one of the reasons why developers choose iOS, there's simply way less incentive to code for Android.


     


       Are you developer? Do you have experience with both iOS and Android? 

  • Reply 10 of 95
    andreyandrey Posts: 108member




    Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post





    Your reasons why it means nothing are exactly why it means everything


     


       OEMs for android phones have no interest for adoption of newer versions for discontinued hardware. They just release new phones with new software. This is what I meant by different pattern.

  • Reply 11 of 95
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    andrey wrote: »
       OEMs for android phones have no interest for adoption of newer versions for discontinued hardware. They just release new phones with new software. This is what I meant by different pattern.

    Based on Google's stated activation numbers vendors aren't using the new software or the adoption wouldn't be dominated by an OS that stopped being updated 2 years ago.
  • Reply 12 of 95
    lol everyone updated because jailbreak for ios6.1 comes out this sunday and just maybe my phone finally will have more feature it should have... this is my last iphone tired of them no innovating anymore
  • Reply 13 of 95
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 1,911member
    Maybe users are just that desperate to see speed improvements after ios 6 slowed their devices to a painful extent. Too bad there aren't any speed improvements listed as changes.
  • Reply 14 of 95
    andreyandrey Posts: 108member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post





    Based on Google's stated activation numbers vendors aren't using the new software or the adoption wouldn't be dominated by an OS that stopped being updated 2 years ago.


     


      Well, whatever. I just updated my and daughter's iPads and I can bet my wife will find out in few months that there was an update. Not everyone is geek and don't even care. ICS and JB just like completely different software while iOS 6.1 isn't different from 4.x 

  • Reply 15 of 95
    stelligentstelligent Posts: 2,680member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Andrey View Post


     


       Are you developer? Do you have experience with both iOS and Android? 





    I am and I do. And it is a big effing pain to test apps on Android. I am lucky that I am primarily doing this for "in-house" apps for companies that only deploy a limited number of varieties of Android devices. But if I were doing this for selling to consumers at large, I'd be testing on more devices than I'd care for. On the other hand, Android offers more flexibility. But this doesn't outweigh the extra pain.

  • Reply 16 of 95
    andreyandrey Posts: 108member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dysamoria View Post



    Maybe users are just that desperate to see speed improvements after ios 6 slowed their devices to a painful extent. Too bad there aren't any speed improvements listed as changes.


     


    Nothing is wrong with 6, at least on Retina and Mini.

  • Reply 17 of 95
    stelligentstelligent Posts: 2,680member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dysamoria View Post



    Maybe users are just that desperate to see speed improvements after ios 6 slowed their devices to a painful extent. Too bad there aren't any speed improvements listed as changes.




    Liar.

  • Reply 18 of 95
    andreyandrey Posts: 108member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by stelligent View Post




    I am and I do. And it is a big effing pain to test apps on Android. I am lucky that I am primarily doing this for "in-house" apps for companies that only deploy a limited number of varieties of Android devices. But if I were doing this for selling to consumers at large, I'd be testing on more devices than I'd care for. On the other hand, Android offers more flexibility. But this doesn't outweigh the extra pain.



     


    Our primary platform is Windows/AIX but we have few apps for Android/iOS tablets and for iPod with third party IR scanner. No issues for both.

  • Reply 19 of 95
    tylerk36tylerk36 Posts: 1,037member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Andrey View Post


     


       Are you developer? Do you have experience with both iOS and Android? 



    Help I have falen and I my mind can't get up.

  • Reply 20 of 95
    There's also a fundamental difference in the way software is handled by Apple compared to all the other Android OEMs.

    Apple provides their software for their hardware. When it comes times to update your iPhone, iPad or iPod... you download the software directly from Apple servers.... and they know exactly the device you're using.

    On Android... it's different. In the first place... the OEMs have to get a copy on Android from Google... and tweak it work on each of their devices at launch. That takes time. Then they have to do all that [I]again[/I] when there's an update. So not only did they have to massage a version of Android when they first released the phone... they would have to do it each time an update comes around. Then multiply that by however many devices they have... it could be a dozen or more.

    Plus... the OEMs only make money when you buy a [I]new[/I] device... so what's the real incentive to update an older phone? Some may offer an update once... but the vast majority of Android phones rarely get more than one update.

    And we haven't even mentioned the carrier's role in all of this. Some Android updates come from the carrier. So that's 3 parties involved... Google, the manufacturer, and the carrier.

    No wonder why Apple devices get updates faster... they control everything end-to-end.

    Android has too many hands stirring the pot.
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