Apple's iPhone grows to 43% share among US smartphones

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2014
Apple's iPhone continues to expand on its lead as the most popular smartphone in the U.S., taking more than 40 percent of the American market, according to new figures from Kantar.



The newest report from Kantar Worldpanel ComTech shows the iPhone with a 43.4 percent share of the United States market for the three months ending in July. That represents a 7.8 percentage point increase over the same period from a year ago. The United States, according to Kantar's numbers, remains Apple's strongest market, though the iPhone saw identical growth in Great Britain, where it jumped 7.8 points year-over-year to take a 31.1 percent share.

Apple's year-over-year growth in the United States came almost entirely at the expense of Google's Android platform. Android, which still powers a majority of smartphones in the U.S., saw its share shrink by 7.6 points. Combined, the two platforms make up 94.5 of the smartphone market in the U.S.

Kantar's figures reflect the numbers regularly seen from American wireless carriers. Over the past several quarters, the iPhone has consistently proved the most popular handset at each of the United States' largest carriers. In the last quarter, the iPhone accounted for 51 percent of smartphone sales at Verizon, more than half at AT&T, a sizable portion of sales at Sprint, and 29 percent of T-Mobile's gross customer additions and upgrade smartphone sales.

Apple's iOS is solidly the second-most popular platform in every nation Kantar examined, save Mexico, where it lags both BlackBerry and Windows Phone. In every region examined, except for Germany and China, Apple grew its smartphone market share from July 2012 to July 2013, with the largest growth in the U.S. and Great Britain.

Kantar's report does not paint a rosy picture for any competing operating systems, though. In the U.S., ever-struggling BlackBerry lost another 0.6 percentage points, dropping to just 1.2 percent share. BlackBerry saw equally dismal numbers across the big five European markets, where it now holds only 2.4 percent share.

Microsoft's Windows Phone platform saw an increase in share, but one of only 0.5 points. Europe, though, was more encouraging for the Redmond giant, which has famously struggled toward relevance in the mobile segment. In the big five E.U. nations, Windows Phone jumped from 4.9 to 8.2 percent share over the past year, higher share growth than any other platform saw over the same period in that region. In Germany and Great Britain, Microsoft's platform is approaching 10 percent, while in France it sits at 11 percent.

Microsoft's gains, though, have come in no small part due to the availability of low-cost Windows Phone devices, evidenced by the figure showing that 42 percent of Windows Phone sales over the past year came from consumers upgrading from a featurephone.

Apple, with its larger, more developed app library, could very well slow or reverse Windows Phone's momentum in some markets should it introduce a lower-cost model of its iPhone, as the company is expected to do next week. Previous analyses have speculated that Apple could address 65 percent of the smartphone market depending on the pricing and availability of just such a device.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 92


    Pie chart wars

  • Reply 2 of 92


    Wow! However, outside of these countries, the trend is different. But does it matter that much? I seriously believe that worldwide it will only go up with the 5C.


     


    Now imagine what would happen in the premium segment if Apple releases another iPhone line, with a bigger screen!


     


    ____________________________________________________________


     


    Low cost Nokia smartphones running windows are just fantastic for the price. In fact, clearly the OS is slowing Nokia down on the high end. Great job Nokia, I hope the punch Apple gave you was enough! The Lumia 520 is a fantastic device for the price.

  • Reply 3 of 92
    I will probable buy a 5c then upgrade to large iPhone whenever it comes available.

    I know many who went Samsung just because of big screen want.
  • Reply 4 of 92


    Anyone an idea how much of the total market the US represents?

  • Reply 5 of 92
    I don't understand this "I want a less portable phone" and "I want a shorter battery life" mentality. I just don't get it. If that's what you want, there are plenty of Android phones to choose from.
  • Reply 6 of 92

    Originally Posted by WonkoTheSane View Post


    Anyone an idea how much of the total market the US represents?


     


    Market as in number of phones out there or market as in amount of money out there?

  • Reply 7 of 92
    nagrommenagromme Posts: 2,834member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post



    I don't understand this "I want a less portable phone" and "I want a shorter battery life" mentality. I just don't get it. If that's what you want, there are plenty of Android phones to choose from.


     


    I don't understand wanting it ENOUGH to settle for the huge drawbacks of Android. But I do understand wanting it: different people have different priorities. I like my iPhone 5's size, but there's nothing wrong with wanting bigger.


     


    A bigger screen is worse, yes. AND also better. Smaller phones outsell bigger ones despite the hype, but I too know people, even iOS users, who badly want a bigger screen. They're impressive at first glance even if the experience is poor when that excitement wears off. (Malware, lack of OS updates, bad battery life, lack of many quality apps we're spoiled by on iOS, lack of automatic clone-and-restore when you get a new device or warranty swap, etc. etc.)


     


    For the ecosystem and developers (and thus, for having great apps) screen size fragmentation is a problem Apple should approach cautiously. But just as laptops got popular enough to sell in multiple sizes, and iPads too, it's time to offer iPhones in more than one size (and ditch the original 2:3 size). And OS fragmentation (including vendor overlays) is a worse problem for Android developers than screen size is. Screen size they can solve--OS fragmentation they cannot.


     


    I don't believe it will happen until next year (maybe fall, maybe a separate release earlier) but a bigger iPhone IS coming.


     


    In fact, I wouldn't be shocked if the iPhone 6 next year simply is bigger and only comes in that size; and therefore, one reason to have the iPhone C line is to keep offering a smaller phone. (Which need not be underpowered: the iPhone 5C does not seem to be "low end" by any measure--just mid-range and less pricey than the flagship.)


     


    I also don't think it will be a ridiculous "phablet"--just a size up from the iPhone 5. They won't want to give up TOO much pocketability. And those big Android screens tend to be poor quality displays in many ways. Apple won't want to make that compromise either, and so going absurdly big might also get really expensive.

  • Reply 8 of 92


    I'm curious about what's happening in the German market. I would have expected the iPhone doing quite well there, but they are barely beating Windows... Someone have explanations?

  • Reply 9 of 92
    hill60hill60 Posts: 6,989member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by pedromartins View Post


    Now imagine what would happen in the premium segment if Apple releases another iPhone line, with a bigger screen!


     



     


    Don't forget the anti glare coating.

  • Reply 10 of 92
    hill60hill60 Posts: 6,989member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by nagromme View Post


    ...it's time to offer iPhones in more than one size (and ditch the original 2:3 size)...



     


    What size and aspect ratio does an iPhone 5 screen have compared to the 4S, 4 etcetera?

  • Reply 11 of 92

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


     


    Market as in number of phones out there or market as in amount of money out there?



     


    Phones.


     


    I did some research in the meantime on the web. I found 4.6B in 2010, around 6B today projected to 7.5 in 2014. According to CTIA the US hold around 330M subscribers.


     


    So that makes it about 5%, roughly.


     


    Wow, really puts the growth potential into perspective as this is also including all feature phones if I understand correctly. Lots of colors to sell....

  • Reply 12 of 92
    I must insist that iPhone market share will never gain ground on Android OS market share. Android OS is supposedly the finest OS in the world because it's the one that nearly everyone is using. It is called the poor man's OS because it was given for free from Google. iOS is a walled garden and everyone hates walled gardens. Besides, why buy an iPhone when you can buy a $50 Android smartphone that's just as good as the most expensive iPhone?

    One more thing. The iPhone has a tiny display which they say is nearly unreadable. Most humans can only see text on a 4.7" display or larger. I believe it's a human deficiency to be unable to read anything on a 4" display. This is the main reason why pundits are saying the next iPhone will be a huge failure. Small displays mean small sales. Every Android vendor in the world has a large display smartphone and supposedly that's why Android has 80% of the global smartphone market. 80% of the world needs a smartphone with a larger display. Phablets are the new standard in smartphones.

    /s
  • Reply 13 of 92
    misamisa Posts: 827member

    Now imagine what would happen in the premium segment if Apple releases another iPhone line, with a bigger screen!

    I think you need to look at Nintendo as a reference point of "do bigger screens without an increase in battery life drive better sales in the US", the answer is no, if the hardware is essentially the same.

    I personally think a larger phone is a mistake, as the original phone's size and weight was the right size to be a phone. The "right size" for a phone that you talk on is the distance from your ear to your mouth, and not everyone's head is the same size and shape. The other sizes should have been iPod/iPad models that include the voice calling feature, but not marketed as a phone itself.


    This is why we keep hearing about phablet (ugh what an awful term, makes me think "phat (as in fat)" tablet.) These are marketing people trying to push yet another device size for no other reason than seeing dollar signs.

    The right sizes for a phone are 3" to 5", tablet/ebooks are 7-12". "people want a bigger phone" and "people want a smaller tablet" tell me that the original iphone and ipad sizes were in fact the right sizes to begin with, and in stead there is some segment of people who want a device that is both a phone and a tablet. eg, a PDA (Remember those? The largest models were 4" screens and 200g, while the ipad mini is double that weight (about 400g) and the iphone is half (112g) and both are 8 times the battery life as even the best PDA.)

    There are really three market segments
    - Phone (which primary function is to make phone calls and fit in your pocket, which is 3.5-4" models)
    - Reader/Tablet (ebooks, 7"-10", and meant to be carried in a purse/messenger bag)
    - Laptop (10-18", much larger battery, and full size keyboard)

    If you need anything larger than a tablet, you want a laptop. If you want anything larger than an phone, you clearly don't want a phone. Apple would be better off enabling the phone functionality on the iPad models than fragmenting iOS with yet more screen sizes. We may see this with VoLTE, and not before, since extra parts are required to make voice calls on GSM or CDMA networks.
  • Reply 14 of 92


    Being from Germany I'd guess it's mostly due to cost, as subscriptions for iPhones are on average higher than for Androids. Or put more precisely: You can get Android phones for much less than what you have to pay for an iPhone.


     


    E.g., on T-Mobile you currently pay 350 EUR for a 32GB iPhone 5 with a 2 yr contract and 70 EUR/month for 750 MB/month, with LTE, and all nets flat.


    Androids have the same rates, but very often just cost 1 EUR.


     


     


    Not sure, if that's all.


     


    I do pick up some hostility against apple here and there, coming from nerds, and Apple is considered a bit "suspicious" and still has to many that old stigma of "not compatible with windows" blablabla and being too restrictive. Could be, it's only the press, but that's the gist I often pick up here.

  • Reply 15 of 92

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Constable Odo View Post



    I must insist that iPhone market share will never gain ground on Android OS market share. Android OS is supposedly the finest OS in the world because it's the one that nearly everyone is using. It is called the poor man's OS because it was given for free from Google. iOS is a walled garden and everyone hates walled gardens. Besides, why buy an iPhone when you can buy a $50 Android smartphone that's just as good as the most expensive iPhone?



    One more thing. The iPhone has a tiny display which they say is nearly unreadable. Most humans can only see text on a 4.7" display or larger. I believe it's a human deficiency to be unable to read anything on a 4" display. This is the main reason why pundits are saying the next iPhone will be a huge failure. Small displays mean small sales. Every Android vendor in the world has a large display smartphone and supposedly that's why Android has 80% of the global smartphone market. 80% of the world needs a smartphone with a larger display. Phablets are the new standard in smartphones.



    /s


     


    Wait until the 4.7" geek watch is considered standard....


    /s

  • Reply 16 of 92
    "Being from Germany I'd guess it's mostly due to cost, as subscriptions for iPhones are on average higher than for Androids. Or put more precisely: You can get Android phones for much less than what you have to pay for an iPhone.

    E.g., on T-Mobile you currently pay 350 EUR for a 32GB iPhone 5 with a 2 yr contract and 70 EUR/month for 750 MB/month, with LTE, and all nets flat.
    Androids have the same rates, but very often just cost 1 EUR.


    Not sure, if that's all.

    I do pick up some hostility against apple here and there, coming from nerds, and Apple is considered a bit "suspicious" and still has to many that old stigma of "not compatible with windows" blablabla and being too restrictive. Could be, it's only the press, but that's the gist I often pick up here. "
    -----------

    Thanks : )

    Have to say however that I don't see from your comment much a difference from here (Québec) about reasons (nerds, costs...) for not buying an iPhone. And I'm quite sure Apple doing better here than in Germany. Somewhat, still a mystery ; )
  • Reply 17 of 92

    Originally Posted by WonkoTheSane View Post


    Wait until the 4.7" geek watch is considered standard....


    /s



     


    Well, if you lay it long-ways up the forearm… it only covers roughly half of it.

  • Reply 18 of 92
    The htc one has a bigger but also better screen than the iPhone on every metric. Looks awesome, great build quality and fits nicely in my hands (and everybody's else).

    The thin galaxy note has much better battery life then the iPhone.

    All the "mini" versions still have screens bigger than 4".

    Smaller android devices might sell more because they are much cheaper.

    All points made against another iPhone line are just based on ignorance and blindness or stupidity.
  • Reply 19 of 92
    jragostajragosta Posts: 10,473member
    I must insist that iPhone market share will never gain ground on Android OS market share. Android OS is supposedly the finest OS in the world because it's the one that nearly everyone is using. It is called the poor man's OS because it was given for free from Google. iOS is a walled garden and everyone hates walled gardens. Besides, why buy an iPhone when you can buy a $50 Android smartphone that's just as good as the most expensive iPhone?

    One more thing. The iPhone has a tiny display which they say is nearly unreadable. Most humans can only see text on a 4.7" display or larger. I believe it's a human deficiency to be unable to read anything on a 4" display. This is the main reason why pundits are saying the next iPhone will be a huge failure. Small displays mean small sales. Every Android vendor in the world has a large display smartphone and supposedly that's why Android has 80% of the global smartphone market. 80% of the world needs a smartphone with a larger display. Phablets are the new standard in smartphones.

    /s

    I just found this - it seems to apply to you and the other Google shills here:

    700
  • Reply 20 of 92

    Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


    I just found this - it seems to apply to you and the other Google shills here:


     


    You somehow missed the /s.

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