Apple's cylindrical Mac Pro will debut in Dec. starting at $2,999

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  • Reply 181 of 285
    auxioauxio Posts: 1,989member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by drblank View Post

     

    I think you need to re-read the Apple memo.  The new MacPros come with graphics cards built in and there isn't even an option to replace those cards with third party, so that "hacked for Mac graphics card firmware" goes Bye Bye.


     

    I think you need to re-read post #172 again.

  • Reply 182 of 285
    drblankdrblank Posts: 3,383member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by auxio View Post

     

     

    I think you need to re-read post #172 again.


    No, I think you need to keep your mouth quiet on this Hackintosh BS and get your own house in order with regards to practicing honest and ethical behavior.  Then we won't have any disagreements.

  • Reply 183 of 285
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by drblank View Post

     

    No, I think you need to keep your mouth quiet on this Hackintosh BS and get your own house in order with regards to practicing honest and ethical behavior.  Then we won't have any disagreements.


     

    You are on a crusade!  Are you this strict on everything?  Speeding, for example?  Do you yourself ever speed?  

  • Reply 184 of 285
    drblankdrblank Posts: 3,383member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Bergermeister View Post

     

     

    You are on a crusade!  Are you this strict on everything?  Speeding, for example?  Do you yourself ever speed?  


    I've been known to speed when I was a lot younger.  My last ticket for speeding was about 10 years ago.   I think it was for something like around 5mph over the speed limit.  In fact, I've gotten three of those at known speed traps within about a 2 year period, but this was over 10 years ago.  They were all chicken $hit tickets.  I got a really bad ticket 94+ on the freeway, but that was in early 80's. It was funny, my car's speedometer only went to 80, so I thought I was going 80.  The cop told me I was probably going 110, but he cited me for 94+ so I wouldn't get taken in.  I was laughing my a$$ off. I didn't even think my car could even do 110 in the first place. It was some low end Japanese car from the early 80's. The speedometer only went to 80.  So, what am I supposed know how fast I was going over 80.  I ended up going to traffic school.  l've sped before where I didn't get caught.  But there was basically no one else on the road, one time it was a straight highway in the middle of the day and I took the car up to 110 for about 10 seconds or so.  I had recently bought the car, so I just wanted to see what it felt like.  I had also taken one of those driving safety classes that's put on by professional race drivers.   I HIGHLY recommend those courses.  You learn a lot about badly you currently drive and how to deal with potential accidents, how to deal with anti-lock brakes, how to position your seat, mirrors, and steering wheel.  You'd be surprised how many people don't actually know how to set things up.  They said that most people don't know unless they've taken these types of classes.  They said that only a couple of driving schools are teaching properly.  

  • Reply 185 of 285
    drblankdrblank Posts: 3,383member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Bergermeister View Post

     

     

    You are on a crusade!  Are you this strict on everything?  Speeding, for example?  Do you yourself ever speed?  


    Strict on everything?   NO.  Some things I'm pretty lax on, but some things not.  I do have my boundaries on various subjects.  In fact, I'd be willing to bet that I listen to more styles of music than you do.  I just choose not to listen to crap music that barely qualifies as music.  So when someone tries to explain to me what to listen to, I will listen to music, but REAL music, not some BS that 90% of the pop culture is currently spitting out.   Most of it qualifies to me as demo music and not good enough to be sold and promoted.  But that's my feelings.  There was a day when only really good musicians/bands would get a recording contract, they would get experienced producers working with them, and they had to put out albums with real musicians, then things got a little lax and then more crap came out that really shouldn't.  Now, it's a free for all and 90% of the music coming out is TOTAL garbage.  But that's my opinion and actually a lot of well respected musicians, producers and other music critics feel the same way I do, so I'm not alone on that.



    But when it comes to business ethics, ethics in general, I've always had what I feel a lot better integrity over the years.  I might have made a few mistakes when I was young, but generally speaking, i have very little tolerance for dishonest people.  We have too much of it in this world and it certainly isn't good for the business environment or even personal relationships.   Would you make friends with someone that is dishonest?  I have and I've gotten screwed by them.  But most of the time I find people that get caught red handed doing something illegal are afraid to admit it and then make things right with the other party.  I know corporations do that all of the time and it's usually because the attorneys that represent them are usually just LOSERS to begin with and become just as guilty as the people within the company that are doing the violation as all they do is KNOW something illegal is happening, but are paid to ignore it and force things to go to court, when it could have been resolved in a simple HONEST discussion and settlement. 

     

    If you've never been victimized, then you might not know what it feels like, trust me.  With the way things are done, if you've never been victimized, one day soon you will.  It happens to just about everyone many times over their lifespan, especially nowadays with all of the idiots that are being spit out of school and their bad influences where most of these reality TV shows are promoting STUPID behavior.

  • Reply 186 of 285
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by cy_starkman View Post



    No one is talking about channel bonding.



    Very significant tidbit they dropped there

     

    That is all Thunderbolt 2 is... Thunderbolt 1 with the ability to bond two channels.  Or are you talking about some other bonded channels? 

  • Reply 187 of 285
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by emacs72 View Post

     
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by nikon133 View Post





    Add motherboard, storage, power supply, case. Plus, "pro" grade graphics are usually more expensive than consumer/enthusiast parts based on same tech.

     

    - a motherboard with an Intel X79 chipset -- which I believe can support Xeon E5's -- costs around $400

    http://www.asus.com/Motherboards/P9X79_WS/

    http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/chipsets/performance-chipsets/x79-express-chipset.html

     

    - the price of a 256GB SSD is around $250

    http://www.corsair.com/en/ssd/neutron-series-ssd/neutron-series-256gb-sata-3-6gbs-ssd.html

     

    so those two components would add $650 on top of the CPU + GPU + memory cost of $1000.  that would leave about $1400 for power supply, case, I/O ports and enterprise class GPU drivers.


     

    You quoted a SATA SSD Price, but all the new Macs have moved to PCIe for additional performance. 

  • Reply 188 of 285
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by fixmdude View Post

     
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by nikon133 View Post



    On the other hand, if you are working in Windows environment, you will probably not be considering Macs in general.

     

    I work in a Windows environment but I don't want a giant workstation box to put somewhere.  I switched to a MacBook Pro that sits on my desktop, closed, flat, used as another surface, plugged into my monitor, keyboard and mouse.  I just set the power savings control panel to not put the computer to sleep when the lid is closed.

     


     

    No need to do that. I have used macs in this way for years. 

     

    Plug in all IO cables to the mac applying power last. Keyboard should wake the mac so you can login. Reverse with power first followed by all other IO to disconnect and take your mac with you. If it goes to sleep or not is a controlled by power savings panel as you mentioned. You can have it go to sleep and wake it with keyboard, etc. using this connect/disconnect pattern.

  • Reply 189 of 285
    auxioauxio Posts: 1,989member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Phone-UI-Guy View Post

     

     

    That is all Thunderbolt 2 is... Thunderbolt 1 with the ability to bond two channels.  Or are you talking about some other bonded channels? 


     

    I think he means the ability to combine multiple interfaces into a single data connection in order to boost speed.  I used to have a Linux NAS/router box where I bonded two gigabit ethernet ports for maximum speed (great when multiple computers are copying large files across the network).

  • Reply 190 of 285
    auxioauxio Posts: 1,989member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by drblank View Post

     

    Strict on everything?   NO.  Some things I'm pretty lax on, but some things not.  I do have my boundaries on various subjects.  In fact, I'd be willing to bet that I listen to more styles of music than you do.  I just choose not to listen to crap music that barely qualifies as music.  So when someone tries to explain to me what to listen to, I will listen to music, but REAL music, not some BS that 90% of the pop culture is currently spitting out.   Most of it qualifies to me as demo music and not good enough to be sold and promoted.  But that's my feelings.  There was a day when only really good musicians/bands would get a recording contract, they would get experienced producers working with them, and they had to put out albums with real musicians, then things got a little lax and then more crap came out that really shouldn't.  Now, it's a free for all and 90% of the music coming out is TOTAL garbage.  But that's my opinion and actually a lot of well respected musicians, producers and other music critics feel the same way I do, so I'm not alone on that.



    But when it comes to business ethics, ethics in general, I've always had what I feel a lot better integrity over the years.  I might have made a few mistakes when I was young, but generally speaking, i have very little tolerance for dishonest people.  We have too much of it in this world and it certainly isn't good for the business environment or even personal relationships.   Would you make friends with someone that is dishonest?  I have and I've gotten screwed by them.  But most of the time I find people that get caught red handed doing something illegal are afraid to admit it and then make things right with the other party.  I know corporations do that all of the time and it's usually because the attorneys that represent them are usually just LOSERS to begin with and become just as guilty as the people within the company that are doing the violation as all they do is KNOW something illegal is happening, but are paid to ignore it and force things to go to court, when it could have been resolved in a simple HONEST discussion and settlement. 

     

    If you've never been victimized, then you might not know what it feels like, trust me.  With the way things are done, if you've never been victimized, one day soon you will.  It happens to just about everyone many times over their lifespan, especially nowadays with all of the idiots that are being spit out of school and their bad influences where most of these reality TV shows are promoting STUPID behavior.


     

    ok, so now we get down to what really motivates your beliefs -- personal experience.  And I will never argue with that.

     

    Here's my personal experience (which is just as valid as yours).  When I was younger (post-secondary age), I met some really brilliant people who I credit with help breaking me out of the thinking I had developed as a child (from my very limited experiences and the outlook of my parents).  They were very well-read in philosophy, history, art, politics, and raised questions about the statements I made, forcing me to think more deeply about them and find what I truly believed, and really find evidence in the world (historical writings, world events, etc) to support my beliefs.  Similar to what a scientist does for a scientific hypothesis, but for a personal belief system.

     

    Existentialist, social, political philosophy, the connections to art/music/expression, the foundations of technology and the balance of logic/mathematics/structure with creativity.  This was the 'trip' that lead me to become who I am today.  It was not the American media's portrayal of kids throwing away their lives.  In fact, it was the exact opposite: it was a factor in helping me find mine.  I can imagine that living around Berkeley in the late 60s/early 70s would have been a similar experience for many during that time -- an intellectual journey which helped influence the mindset which drove the personal computing revolution (create tools, create your own world).

     

    So that covers one part of the picture.  The other is that my family didn't have a lot of money growing up.  We weren't poor, but certainly I went into debt for the opportunity at post-secondary education.  This in a country where tuition at a decent school is substantially less costly than it is in the US (though getting closer each year).  I honestly don't know if I would have had the same opportunity living in the US.

     

    So anyways, I had to make do with learning using whatever technology I could get my hands on growing up.  I definitely couldn't afford Macs, and often hacked together machines out of whatever PC components I could afford.  Which actually turned out to be a great journey of learning how computer internals work (necessity is the mother of invention).  And this is where I can relate to the Hackintosh community -- the exploration/learning with what you have side of it, not the illegal business end of it.

     

    This is the side of life which you don't see because your experiences seem to be solely related to creating and maintaining businesses.  In my limited experience of the business world, I can definitely understand where you are coming from (it's a real ethics free-for-all, to put it nicely).  However, what you don't realize is that, in the vast majority of cases, it's not the people who are spending countless hours learning about computer hardware who are creating businesses around the sale of Hackintosh machines (where would they find the time?), it's the unethical investors who see an opportunity to make money off of them.

     

    And yes, there are certainly technology people who make a career out of working for these unethical investors because of some misguided anger towards society.  Kinda like there was in the late 60s, but without the constructive outlets (protests, creating tools for self-sustainability in an attempt to break away from society, etc).  I can only imagine what would have happened to the Steves had they found someone willing to fund their blue-box business...

  • Reply 191 of 285
    drblankdrblank Posts: 3,383member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by auxio View Post

     

     

    ok, so now we get down to what really motivates your beliefs -- personal experience.  And I will never argue with that.

     

    Here's my personal experience (which is just as valid as yours).  When I was younger (post-secondary age), I met some really brilliant people who I credit with help breaking me out of the thinking I had developed as a child (from my very limited experiences and the outlook of my parents).  They were very well-read in philosophy, history, art, politics, and raised questions about the statements I made, forcing me to think more deeply about them and find what I truly believed, and really find evidence in the world (historical writings, world events, etc) to support my beliefs.  Similar to what a scientist does for a scientific hypothesis, but for a personal belief system.

     

    Existentialist, social, political philosophy, the connections to art/music/expression, the foundations of technology and the balance of logic/mathematics/structure with creativity.  This was the 'trip' that lead me to become who I am today.  It was not the American media's portrayal of kids throwing away their lives.  In fact, it was the exact opposite: it was a factor in helping me find mine.  I can imagine that living around Berkeley in the late 60s/early 70s would have been a similar experience for many during that time -- an intellectual journey which helped influence the mindset which drove the personal computing revolution (create tools, create your own world).

     

    So that covers one part of the picture.  The other is that my family didn't have a lot of money growing up.  We weren't poor, but certainly I went into debt for the opportunity at post-secondary education.  This in a country where tuition at a decent school is substantially less costly than it is in the US (though getting closer each year).  I honestly don't know if I would have had the same opportunity living in the US.

     

    So anyways, I had to make do with learning using whatever technology I could get my hands on growing up.  I definitely couldn't afford Macs, and often hacked together machines out of whatever PC components I could afford.  Which actually turned out to be a great journey of learning how computer internals work (necessity is the mother of invention).  And this is where I can relate to the Hackintosh community -- the exploration/learning with what you have side of it, not the illegal business end of it.

     

    This is the side of life which you don't see because your experiences seem to be solely related to creating and maintaining businesses.  In my limited experience of the business world, I can definitely understand where you are coming from (it's a real ethics free-for-all, to put it nicely).  However, what you don't realize is that, in the vast majority of cases, it's not the people who are spending countless hours learning about computer hardware who are creating businesses around the sale of Hackintosh machines (where would they find the time?), it's the unethical investors who see an opportunity to make money off of them.

     

    And yes, there are certainly technology people who make a career out of working for these unethical investors because of some misguided anger towards society.  Kinda like there was in the late 60s, but without the constructive outlets (protests, creating tools for self-sustainability in an attempt to break away from society, etc).  I can only imagine what would have happened to the Steves had they found someone willing to fund their blue-box business...


    I grew up with people that had an education and they had friends that had lots of education, PhD's in psychology, physics, mechanical engineering, etc., etc. etc. etc. etc.  All the top people in whatever discipline was presented around me.  I wasn't given a Mac by my parents, I have always PAID for my own.  Sometimes, I bought used because I couldn't afford new.  My parents only paid for books and tuition to college.  Living expenses were my own doing.  I had to work full time making low wages while attending night school for 4 years.  I had also taken another 4 years to finish one of my degrees as I invested money along the way (Microsoft/Intel mostly) that helped pay for living expenses, etc.  I've been broke to the point where I had no money to eat food for a month and had to literally go through garbage cans looking for food.  Talk about BROKE.  I have been more broke than you, so quit your whining.  Have you ever had a job where upper management was doing things that were illegal and unethical and it affected YOUR ability to do YOUR job and then you get a call from the CEO of the company you work for and on the line is the VP of Legal, VP of HR, COO, and VP of Marketing on a conference call telling you not to talk to the media about some specific things that were going on and then the CEO tells you that your job is not in jeopardy and then the next day your manager fires you for nothing that you've done wrong or written up about? And then you find out years later that they tampered with your personnel files and that you can sue a TON of RICH alcoholic as swipes for everything they have, but you don't have any money to hire an attorney, or can't an attorney to take your case and your parents won't help, even though they could??  And as a result you can't get a job because of what they are saying behind your back? 

     

    So right now, I have what ever money I have from however I have it (legally mind you) and if I want to buy some decent stereo system to listen to higher quality music on my iMac but I don't have megabucks to do it, but I can afford $2000, then I think I'm entitled to do so.



    I have had other people that were SUPPOSED to be my friend that turned out that they did other things that violated my civil rights where I can sue LITERALLY about 30 companies for copyright infringement, but some of the cases are only worth $7500 on up to $1.5 Mil or more, but I don't have the money to get an attorney or can't find a decent one willing to take my case, or I just simply don't want the extra stress of suing RICH companies that HAVE the money to pay the settlements.

     

    Or about a bank that tried to withheld $140K of your money illegally or doing other things preventing your access to large sums of YOUR money and you're not doing anything wrong or illegal?  they just figured out a way to lie to me and get away with it unit l can find an attorney that won't gouge me for 33% when they don't need to spend much time on the case.

     

    Now, I know people grow up in different environments, etc.  Some people have and some people don't.  If you don't, then don't worry about what other people that do have.  There are people that like good stereos, cars, boats, etc. etc.  I don't try to conjure up BS to try to put someone down because they want to spend $100 Million on boat, when I would NEVER do that, even if I did have that amount of money.

     

    To try to damage someone's reputation because they sell cables costing thousands of dollars calling it snake oil because some of the TOP recording studios or mega buck stereos use them seems to me like they AREN'T snake oil.  A recording studio RARELY buys something expensive just to show off, they buy it because THEY hear the difference and THEY buy LOTS of equipment that they thought was great one day and not the next.  You should see what some studios like OceanWay has in their arsenal of equipment that may get used once a year by someone.   It's ridiculous to some, but not to others.

     

    So if you don't like how much someone ELSE spends on money, then keep it to yourself or THINK about WHY they might spend that money.  If it's just because it's got gold plating and diamonds on it, that's for show. But if it's the internal workings, build quality, design, limited production, etc., then it's not.  Yeah, the big buck systems are 50% for sound/quality and 50% for show because as long as you are buying something that expensive, it might as well LOOK expensive.  That's partly how SOME companies sell product.  Some don't.  Some are ugly as sin, but sound and are built like tanks.   It's all in what someone wants and is wiling to pay for.



    So, what's your point?  somehow, as tear jerking as your story is, it's not so significant to me.   Got it?



    Next topic.

  • Reply 192 of 285
    drblankdrblank Posts: 3,383member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by auxio View Post

     

     

    ok, so now we get down to what really motivates your beliefs -- personal experience.  And I will never argue with that.

     

    Here's my personal experience (which is just as valid as yours).  When I was younger (post-secondary age), I met some really brilliant people who I credit with help breaking me out of the thinking I had developed as a child (from my very limited experiences and the outlook of my parents).  They were very well-read in philosophy, history, art, politics, and raised questions about the statements I made, forcing me to think more deeply about them and find what I truly believed, and really find evidence in the world (historical writings, world events, etc) to support my beliefs.  Similar to what a scientist does for a scientific hypothesis, but for a personal belief system.

     

    Existentialist, social, political philosophy, the connections to art/music/expression, the foundations of technology and the balance of logic/mathematics/structure with creativity.  This was the 'trip' that lead me to become who I am today.  It was not the American media's portrayal of kids throwing away their lives.  In fact, it was the exact opposite: it was a factor in helping me find mine.  I can imagine that living around Berkeley in the late 60s/early 70s would have been a similar experience for many during that time -- an intellectual journey which helped influence the mindset which drove the personal computing revolution (create tools, create your own world).

     

    So that covers one part of the picture.  The other is that my family didn't have a lot of money growing up.  We weren't poor, but certainly I went into debt for the opportunity at post-secondary education.  This in a country where tuition at a decent school is substantially less costly than it is in the US (though getting closer each year).  I honestly don't know if I would have had the same opportunity living in the US.

     

    So anyways, I had to make do with learning using whatever technology I could get my hands on growing up.  I definitely couldn't afford Macs, and often hacked together machines out of whatever PC components I could afford.  Which actually turned out to be a great journey of learning how computer internals work (necessity is the mother of invention).  And this is where I can relate to the Hackintosh community -- the exploration/learning with what you have side of it, not the illegal business end of it.

     

    This is the side of life which you don't see because your experiences seem to be solely related to creating and maintaining businesses.  In my limited experience of the business world, I can definitely understand where you are coming from (it's a real ethics free-for-all, to put it nicely).  However, what you don't realize is that, in the vast majority of cases, it's not the people who are spending countless hours learning about computer hardware who are creating businesses around the sale of Hackintosh machines (where would they find the time?), it's the unethical investors who see an opportunity to make money off of them.

     

    And yes, there are certainly technology people who make a career out of working for these unethical investors because of some misguided anger towards society.  Kinda like there was in the late 60s, but without the constructive outlets (protests, creating tools for self-sustainability in an attempt to break away from society, etc).  I can only imagine what would have happened to the Steves had they found someone willing to fund their blue-box business...


    Y:eah, they have those Magic Jack boxes that allow free phone calls over the internet.

  • Reply 193 of 285
    auxioauxio Posts: 1,989member
    Quote:

    So, what's your point?  somehow, as tear jerking as your story is, it's not so significant to me.   Got it?


     

    Then you obviously missed the point.  It's not about me, nor is my story even tear jerking.  It's about seeing that people can have different outlooks on life.  Yours is obviously very money and business centric, mine is on always learning, creating, seeing what's possible.

     

    It's also about different paths to finding one's purpose in life, even if such paths may lead people through areas that some people believe they should be locked up and have the key thrown away for (like experimenting with mind-altering substances or using technology they own in ways it wasn't intended for the purpose of learning).  Because, in my way of thinking, it's far more rewarding to focus on the potential of people given a chance to do something great, than to blindly pass judgement on others because you've had bad experiences in the past.

     

    I'm sorry you've encountered so many money-grubbers in your life.  I've encountered a few as well, and I generally try to stay away from such people (and not work for companies which have that feel to them).  Though I have no doubt that it's easier in my line of work (being around mostly inspired, creative people) than yours.

  • Reply 194 of 285
    drblankdrblank Posts: 3,383member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by auxio View Post

     

     

    ok, so now we get down to what really motivates your beliefs -- personal experience.  And I will never argue with that.

     

    Here's my personal experience (which is just as valid as yours).  When I was younger (post-secondary age), I met some really brilliant people who I credit with help breaking me out of the thinking I had developed as a child (from my very limited experiences and the outlook of my parents).  They were very well-read in philosophy, history, art, politics, and raised questions about the statements I made, forcing me to think more deeply about them and find what I truly believed, and really find evidence in the world (historical writings, world events, etc) to support my beliefs.  Similar to what a scientist does for a scientific hypothesis, but for a personal belief system.

     

    Existentialist, social, political philosophy, the connections to art/music/expression, the foundations of technology and the balance of logic/mathematics/structure with creativity.  This was the 'trip' that lead me to become who I am today.  It was not the American media's portrayal of kids throwing away their lives.  In fact, it was the exact opposite: it was a factor in helping me find mine.  I can imagine that living around Berkeley in the late 60s/early 70s would have been a similar experience for many during that time -- an intellectual journey which helped influence the mindset which drove the personal computing revolution (create tools, create your own world).

     

    So that covers one part of the picture.  The other is that my family didn't have a lot of money growing up.  We weren't poor, but certainly I went into debt for the opportunity at post-secondary education.  This in a country where tuition at a decent school is substantially less costly than it is in the US (though getting closer each year).  I honestly don't know if I would have had the same opportunity living in the US.

     

    So anyways, I had to make do with learning using whatever technology I could get my hands on growing up.  I definitely couldn't afford Macs, and often hacked together machines out of whatever PC components I could afford.  Which actually turned out to be a great journey of learning how computer internals work (necessity is the mother of invention).  And this is where I can relate to the Hackintosh community -- the exploration/learning with what you have side of it, not the illegal business end of it.

     

    This is the side of life which you don't see because your experiences seem to be solely related to creating and maintaining businesses.  In my limited experience of the business world, I can definitely understand where you are coming from (it's a real ethics free-for-all, to put it nicely).  However, what you don't realize is that, in the vast majority of cases, it's not the people who are spending countless hours learning about computer hardware who are creating businesses around the sale of Hackintosh machines (where would they find the time?), it's the unethical investors who see an opportunity to make money off of them.

     

    And yes, there are certainly technology people who make a career out of working for these unethical investors because of some misguided anger towards society.  Kinda like there was in the late 60s, but without the constructive outlets (protests, creating tools for self-sustainability in an attempt to break away from society, etc).  I can only imagine what would have happened to the Steves had they found someone willing to fund their blue-box business...


    The people that make the money on Hackintosh are the motherboard mfg, cases mfg, etc. that sell DIY clone boxes, what OS they put on it, they don't know and don't really care.   The Hackintosh system is just predominately (from MY observations) typically kids and some adults (that STILL act like kids) that want to buy some high powered tower with faster this, more that, for less than a Mac Pro, etc. so they can feel superior and in the end all they REALLY use them for are video games that they could have EASILY been playing on an Nintendo, Xbox, or WEEEEEEE  box. but they just want to feel superior to the kids that come from money that have MacPro systems.  That's MY observation regarding MOST of the Hackintosh users I've run into..  Basically punks.

  • Reply 195 of 285
    auxioauxio Posts: 1,989member
    Quote:
    The people that make the money on Hackintosh are the motherboard mfg, cases mfg, etc. that sell DIY clone boxes, what OS they put on it, they don't know and don't really care.

     

    And these are the people who should be charged.  As soon as it crosses the line from: "Hey, I want to see if it's possible to run OS X on my personal PC" to "Let's make money selling clone boxes", then it has crossed from exploration to exploitation.

     

    Quote:

    The Hackintosh system is just predominately (from MY observations) typically kids and some adults (that STILL act like kids) that want to buy some high powered tower with faster this, more that, for less than a Mac Pro, etc. so they can feel superior and in the end all they REALLY use them for are video games that they could have EASILY been playing on an Nintendo, Xbox, or WEEEEEEE  box. but they just want to feel superior to the kids that come from money that have MacPro systems.  That's MY observation regarding MOST of the Hackintosh users I've run into..  Basically punks.


     

    And again, you're confusing some of the people who run Hackintosh boxes with the ones who are learning how computer internals work in the process of trying to figure out how to run OS X on a PC in the first place (or how to put PC components into a Mac).

     

    It's kinda like the difference between someone who simply buys and street races a modded car, and the mechanic who figures out how to make those modifications to the car in the first place.

  • Reply 196 of 285
    drblankdrblank Posts: 3,383member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by auxio View Post

     

     

    Then you obviously missed the point.  It's not about me, nor is my story even tear jerking.  It's about seeing that people can have different outlooks on life.  Yours is obviously very money and business centric, mine is on always learning, creating, seeing what's possible.

     

    It's also about different paths to finding one's purpose in life, even if such paths may lead people through areas that some people believe they should be locked up and have the key thrown away for (like experimenting with mind-altering substances or using technology in ways it wasn't intended).  Because, in my way of thinking, it's far more rewarding to focus on the potential of people given a chance to do something great, than to blindly pass judgement on others because you've had bad experiences in the past.

     

    I'm sorry you've encountered so many money-grubbers in your life.  I've encountered a few as well, and I generally try to stay away from such people (and not work for companies which have that feel to them).  Though I have no doubt that it's easier in my line of work (being around mostly inspired, creative people) than yours.


    What industry are you in that's inspired, creative, and not full of money grubbing selfish, petty, vindictive, and unethical people? Kind of hard to find those.   They usually turn up when you are least prepared and expected.  That's seems to be how criminals work.  they lie to your face to rope you in and then take you by surprise.  Happens ALL OF THE TIME.  I just draw the line with certain things.  I'll first tell someone it's wrong or illegal and HOPEFULLY they'll learn quickly, but the more they fight, the more I'll stand up for what's right. I've just run into a lot of Hackintosh users or others doing things illegal, unethical that are wrong and it's frustrating after a while. It makes one not give a crap what happens to other people, even though I do in a lot of ways.  I guess I'll just take the side of honesty, ethics and legal rather than dishonesty and illegal.  How about that?

  • Reply 197 of 285
    auxioauxio Posts: 1,989member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by drblank View Post

     

    What industry are you in that's inspired, creative, and not full of money grubbing selfish, petty, vindictive, and unethical people?


     

    Computer hardware and software.  And yes, on the business side of things, there's always someone trying to copy the work you do and sell it (which is where I've encountered the money-grubbers).  However, on the side where one actually creates the products (product development teams), it's full of inspired, creative people who simply enjoy seeing what's possible (not all, but most).

     

    I also seem to notice that, when I'm in the US, people seem to really have that "out to get mine" attitude moreso than here in Canada.  Which is likely why American businesses are very competitive in the world, but it makes me feel like I need to have my guard up all the time, and I feel like I have a hard time connecting with some people on a human/personal level.

  • Reply 198 of 285

    Hey guys, I realize that this thread has been pretty much dead regarding the  new Mac Pro but let's try and get it back on topic. Maybe you can compare life experience by using the PM feature.

     

    One of the big questions, at least in my mind, is how much extra  is it going to cost to upgrade the PCIe storage? On the new Mac Book with PCIe storage it's $300 to go from 256GB to 512GB. OWC has PCIe storage for the old Mac Pro $459.99 for 240GB, $719.99 for 480GB, a $260 difference. 

     

    http://eshop.macsales.com/shop/SSD/PCIe/OWC/Mercury_Accelsior/Buy_Now

     

    So hopefully the bump up to 512GB will come in around $300, but given this is Apple and it might be a customer design module, it could be a hundred or two higher.

     

    Thoughts? 

  • Reply 199 of 285
    auxioauxio Posts: 1,989member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by OldCodger73 View Post

     

    Hey guys, I realize that this thread has been pretty much dead regarding the  new Mac Pro but let's try and get it back on topic. Maybe you can compare life experience by using the PM feature.


     

    Yeah, sorry about that.  Usually when a thread gets beyond 3 pages, it's already off topic (as this one was), but I got a bit carried away...

     

    Quote:


    So hopefully the bump up to 512GB will come in around $300, but given this is Apple and it might be a customer design module, it could be a hundred or two higher.

     

    Thoughts? 



     

    Apple has been pretty decent on their upgrade pricing of late (usually no more than $50-100 higher than if you did it yourself).  But yeah, given that it's aimed at pros, they might try to push the margins a bit higher.  Can't imagine more than a couple hundred higher.

  • Reply 200 of 285
    relicrelic Posts: 4,735member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by OldCodger73 View Post

     

    Hey guys, I realize that this thread has been pretty much dead regarding the  new Mac Pro but let's try and get it back on topic. Maybe you can compare life experience by using the PM feature.

     

    One of the big questions, at least in my mind, is how much extra  is it going to cost to upgrade the PCIe storage? On the new Mac Book with PCIe storage it's $300 to go from 256GB to 512GB. OWC has PCIe storage for the old Mac Pro $459.99 for 240GB, $719.99 for 480GB, a $260 difference. 

     

    http://eshop.macsales.com/shop/SSD/PCIe/OWC/Mercury_Accelsior/Buy_Now

     

    So hopefully the bump up to 512GB will come in around $300, but given this is Apple and it might be a customer design module, it could be a hundred or two higher.

     

    Thoughts? 


     

    Yea I think that sounds about right, Apple does charge quite a bit for upgrades though, a little to much, their memory upgrade prices for instance are almost absurd.
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