Director Michael Bay's onstage meltdown steals the show at Samsung CES press event

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  • Reply 41 of 137
    Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

    That scrolls the text and has adjustable rate scrolling?

     

    That’s what practice is for. <img class=" src="http://forums-files.appleinsider.com/images/smilies//lol.gif" />

     

    If someone’s totally unfamiliar with the words they’re about to say, would you think they’d want them to scroll past at different rates? You set that up when the presenter has his pace down and knows where he’s going to be faster.

  • Reply 42 of 137
    That’s what practice is for. :lol:

    If someone’s totally unfamiliar with the words they’re about to say, would you think they’d want them to scroll past at different rates? You set that up when the presenter has his pace down and knows where he’s going to be faster.

    I noticed they had a 'prompter problem at the Audi event also, but at least they had notes on them in case of a failure.
  • Reply 43 of 137
    crowleycrowley Posts: 10,453member
    Seems like someone has made up their own definition of what a teleprompter is.
  • Reply 44 of 137
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by DarkLite View Post

     

    It's mildy amusing, if not the unbelievable hilarity of Qualcomm's keynote last year.


    What happened at last year's Qualcomm keynote?

  • Reply 44 of 137
    Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

    Seems like someone has made up their own definition of what a teleprompter is.

     

    Yep. And? Get over yourself.

     

    If Bay had used Keynote, he wouldn’t have had this problem. Or practiced at all.

  • Reply 46 of 137

    IMO, if you're getting paid to offer a laudatory talk on a product, you had darn-well better be prepared to do it, through organized thinking and practice. Clearly Mr. Bay was not.  If, on the other hand, you're a company presenting a staged play, you had darn-well better prepare your cast to do it, through rehearsal and direction.  Clearly Samsung was not.  So, either way, this was a failure. 

     

    Blaming the technology is merely to assign a scapegoat.  I do a lot of group presentations.  I have been trained to mentally prepare for the pitfalls of live performance: I am always prepared to deliver a quality presentation with a memorable message, even in the event of wardrobe malfunction, dead batteries, projection failure, disruptive protesters, or even complete blackout.  My show WILL go on.  And I am not being paid anywhere near what Mr. Bay was being paid.  Hell, I'm just an academic.

  • Reply 47 of 137
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    That’s what practice is for. :lol:

    If someone’s totally unfamiliar with the words they’re about to say, would you think they’d want them to scroll past at different rates? You set that up when the presenter has his pace down and knows where he’s going to be faster.

    They could have gone over it but it's still a teleprompter which is not the same as the aforementioned presentation programs. If they had Keynote or Powerpoint on a screen it could have still crashed on them and he would be in the same position if he choose not to or wasn't given an opportunity to rehearse.

    You do know that teleprompters aren't some obscure item in the world, right? They are used all over the world for presenting news in a natural way which is why. You don't see them at Apple's event because they plan for and memorize their scripts and the Keynote slides they show are facing 'us' not the speaker. It's a completely different concept.
  • Reply 48 of 137
    After watching that train wreck several times, I get the impression someone at Samsung saw Bay walking around the Samsung booth, he saw their curved TV and said he loved it and they asked him if he'd be willing to go on stage with no prep just to say a few words. Everything seemed so unplanned to the point Samsung would've taken anyone and used them on stage if they were available.
  • Reply 49 of 137
    In other news... Apple?!?!?? What is this, Samsung insider?

    Clickbait Insider.
  • Reply 50 of 137
    Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

    You do know that teleprompters aren't some obscure item in the world, right?

     

    Sure. Shame they don’t work very well. ;)

     

    You don’t see them at Apple’s event because they plan for and memorize their scripts…


     

    Is it just because that requires actual work that we don’t see other companies do the same?

     

    …and the Keynote slides they show are facing ‘us’ not the speaker. 


     

    Of course they face the speaker! Again, Apple has televisions embedded in the stage where they can see what they’re doing without turning around, and where they have notes for what’s up.

  • Reply 51 of 137
    solipsismx wrote: »
    They could have gone over it but it's still a teleprompter which is not the same as the aforementioned presentation programs. If they had Keynote or Powerpoint on a screen it could have still crashed on them and he would be in the same position if he choose not to or wasn't given an opportunity to rehearse.

    You do know that teleprompters aren't some obscure item in the world, right? They are used all over the world for presenting news in a natural way which is why. You don't see them at Apple's event because they plan for and memorize their scripts and the Keynote slides they show are facing 'us' not the speaker. It's a completely different concept.

    This same equipment failure has happened to the president and he was reduced to a blubbering incoherent mess.

    Just Google "youtube obama teleprompter failure"
  • Reply 52 of 137
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    This same equipment failure has happened to the president and he was reduced to a blubbering incoherent mess.

    Just Google "youtube obama teleprompter failure"

    [VIDEO]
  • Reply 53 of 137
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    Sure. Shame they don’t work very well. ;)

    Is it just because that requires actual work that we don’t see other companies do the same?

    Of course they face the speaker! Again, Apple has televisions embedded in the stage where they can see what they’re doing without turning around, and where they have notes for what’s up.

    How would this be practical for news channels, late night talk shows, or more specifically The Daily Show or Colbert Report? Teleprompters have their place. You can't simply pooh-pooh them all and think that Keynote is a viable solution for every presentation need.
  • Reply 54 of 137
    solipsismx wrote: »
    You do know that teleprompters aren't some obscure item in the world, right? They are used all over the world for presenting news in a natural way which is why. You don't see them at Apple's event because they plan for and memorize their scripts and the Keynote slides they show are facing 'us' not the speaker. It's a completely different concept.

    They are now. It was kind of fun to watch the evolution of WWDC from 1997 to 2001. Steve Jobs was still taking developer Q&A in 1997, and fielded some challenging questions from angry developers who thought Steve had no business usurping Gil Amelio. Steve had balls and grace. In 1999, Steve was still flubbing lines, skipping over slides, but the keynote went a lot smoother. The post 2007-era keynotes where pure theater, and Steve was extremely polished as a presenter.
  • Reply 55 of 137
    this is a good cap summary of what happened & Bay's response. It's part of the digital culture even though it doesn't involve Apple directly. Dude. Can I just say what if Apple doesn't come out with a 102 inch TV? With a curved screen? Leaving money on the table, dudes.
  • Reply 56 of 137

    PS: No matter whether you're the LA Times, The Verge, Business Insider, Fox News, Bloomberg, The Register, or any of the other pseudo-news copycats out there, "meltdown" is the wrong word for this happening.  A meltdown is when something (similar to a nuclear reactor) loses it's cooling capacity and blows up.  Had Mr. Bay left the stage in an explosion of fury, shouting curses and spewing hate, then perhaps "meltdown" would have been apropos.  But all he did was give-up with a polite, if humiliating, expression of contrition and defeat.  Somewhere in the pipeline of news relay, someone waxed it up into an exaggeration of the real event. 

     

    Do we have free press in the USA?  No!  We have merely parrots and provocateurs.  No independent reporting.  As with the proverbial falling tree, one might ask: does the first amendment really exist if nobody uses it?

  • Reply 57 of 137
    solipsismx wrote: »
    [VIDEO]

    Exactly. Haha!
  • Reply 58 of 137
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    They are now. It was kind of fun to watch the evolution of WWDC from 1997 to 2001. Steve Jobs was still taking developer Q&A in 1997, and fielded some challenging questions from angry developers who thought Steve had no business usurping Gil Amelio. Steve had balls and grace. In 1999, Steve was still flubbing lines, skipping over slides, but the keynote went a lot smoother. The post 2007-era keynotes where pure theater, and Steve was extremely polished as a presenter.

    1) I think the iPhone presentation was the best he did but I personally think the 2010 iPad presentation seemed too ab-libded and sloppy. He went over the same stuff too, too many long pauses, other minor issues.

    2) My favorite Q&A was right before Apple adopted the "Think Different" campaign (I think in 1997). He fielded a question by someone that didn't seem to like Apple doing anything that wasn't completely unique. Steve answered that thinking different is the right mindset. The right mindset is to think better. If that means following in the footsteps of other then so be it.


    edit: Found it!
    • (Starts precisely 12m:17s but put in a time stamp a couple minutes earlier for the lead up)
  • Reply 59 of 137
    jj.yuanjj.yuan Posts: 213member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

     

    I think 2014 will be the year of Samsung Meltdown.


    It would be. On high end, Apple is beating them. On low end, many Chinese electronics firms are catching up with them.

  • Reply 60 of 137
    clemynx wrote: »
    Schadenfreude? Their TV OS is still terrible, especially now compared to what LG has just introduced.

    Oh god no. LG has the worst, most gimmicky TV OS. It's virtually incompatible with universal remotes like the Logitech Harmony, because functions are accessed using an on screen mouse cursor instead of IR codes.
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