Samsung Galaxy Note 4 delivers poor graphics performance vs. Apple iPhone 6 Plus

1246713

Comments

  • Reply 61 of 246

    It would be nice if they could do this test on the Note 4 sold in the US.  We are getting the Snapdragon 805 chip.  The benchmarks on the 805 have been reported to be good but I would like to see the numbers compared in this chart.  It makes you question if they purposely chose the weaker chip for comparison or they simply have not got their hands on the 805 processor yet in a note.  Regardless if you are going to all the effort to call out Samsung at least you could compare all the available hardware in your review. 

  • Reply 62 of 246
    Well this article was a waste of energy since a majority of major markets get the snapdragon 805 chipset. This articles benchmarks are based on the Exnyos chipset. As you can see the galaxy S5 with snapdragon 801 (slower chipset than note 4) has numbers MUCH closer to the iPhone 6. I expect the note 4 with snapdragon 805 to be very similar to the iPhone 6 :-/ nice try though.
  • Reply 63 of 246
    I keep wondering if the rumored 12" MacBook Air and 12" iPad Pro aren't the same device. With a quad-core, 64 bit A-series processor and a multi-core graphics chip, Apple could deliver a serious productivity device that absolutely crushed the business and education markets. The MacBook Air is already one of the most popular business and higher-education laptops. The iPad dominates a similar market, but a slightly different audience (e.g. lower-tier businesses, primary and secondary education). The Surface and Surface Pro aimed to compete with both and bridge the gap between the two, and honestly the Pro 3 is a very functional and attractive device for what it is. If Apple offered a device that was both an iPad Pro and a MacBook Air with that trademark Apple design to gracefully transition between the two uses, it would probably sell a staggering amount of them.

    Of course, Intel will probably freak and it will scare the crap out of Google, Microsoft and Samsung. The Google Chrome netbooks are finally getting a little traction and MS is still struggling to sell its hardware with Intel or ARM inside. Samsung makes impressive Tablets, but they're half-baked and hamstrung by Android. That makes me wonder if someone with decent capital, half a brain and some talented engineers could partner with Ubuntu and crank out something better using Samsung as an OEM. But I digress...
  • Reply 64 of 246
    I keep wondering if the rumored 12" MacBook Air and 12" iPad Pro aren't the same device. With a quad-core, 64 bit A-series processor and a multi-core graphics chip, Apple could deliver a serious productivity device that absolutely crushed the business and education markets. The MacBook Air is already one of the most popular business and higher-education laptops. The iPad dominates a similar market, but a slightly different audience (e.g. lower-tier businesses, primary and secondary education). The Surface and Surface Pro aimed to compete with both and bridge the gap between the two, and honestly the Pro 3 is a very functional and attractive device for what it is. If Apple offered a device that was both an iPad Pro and a MacBook Air with that trademark Apple design to gracefully transition between the two uses, it would probably sell a staggering amount of them.

    Of course, Intel will probably freak and it will scare the crap out of Google, Microsoft and Samsung. The Google Chrome netbooks are finally getting a little traction and MS is still struggling to sell its hardware with Intel or ARM inside. Samsung makes impressive Tablets, but they're half-baked and hamstrung by Android. That makes me wonder if someone with decent capital, half a brain and some talented engineers could partner with Ubuntu and crank out something better using Samsung as an OEM. But I digress...
  • Reply 65 of 246
    jexusjexus Posts: 373member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by lukei View Post



    I suggest you look into the various anti competitive action related cases that show how Intel kept AMD down

     

    Which has nothing to do with the accuracy of my post, and like most people making the claims ignore AMD's own failings.

    AMD had technological leads and was making upwards of up to a billion in profits around 98-00. But from 01-05 and today

    They had terrible management, choosing to continuously fund development of unnecessary fab facilities, despite being explicitly warned against it.

    Had zero focus as a company. They were involved in memory, in logic, in microprocessors, communication products ect.... with almost no talent to properly spread across, resulting in shortages.

    When Intel became resurgent with the core 2 duo's...Did AMD strike back? Did AMD pour it's all into out competing Intel in the face of potential anti trust action? NO. They bought ATI for 5 billion and for years afterwards integrated as well as Sprint Nextel did.

    Then when AMD finally did get back to work it delivered two underperformers in Barcelona and later Bulldozer.

    And worst of all, AMD is it's own worst enemy. AMD has ALWAYS had this pseudo pleasure of being a #2, even when it was prime position to take #1
    ------------

    But of course Blaming Intel is so much easier so most people stick with that.
  • Reply 66 of 246
    Daniel, you are being over exhuberant when stating "Intel and ARM have made very little progress in courting business from mobile devices".

    ARM doesn't make its own chips. It licenses its chip designs.

    ARM certainly OWNS the mobile device market since nearly every chip running is an ARM chip, including Apple's own chips.
  • Reply 67 of 246
    Barcelona and Bulldozer? More like Balogna and Dozer.
  • Reply 68 of 246
    If you look carefully, you can see that the table has results of the last iteration of the Note 3 running the Snapdragon CPU. It does quite well against the just-released iPhone 6 Plus, seemingly even beating it in a couple of the tests. It also outperforms the Note 4 shown here. As if Samsung is going to release a Note 4 which is slower than its predecessor.
    Nearly everyone reading this is going to see/buy the Note 4 using the Snapdragon, not the benchmarked octa-core Samsung CPU. Considering the new Snapdragon CPU is both faster and more powerful than then Note 3, I think the Qualcomm Note 4 benchmarks will be much closer to the iPhone than shown in this article. Heaven forbid, the Samsung may beat it. Obviously the author gets a lot of pleasure from the superior performance of the Apple CPU, but I think the 'opponent' is a straw-man: Samsung will not take this octa-core CPU to major markets.
    So I wouldn't be counting chickens just yet.
  • Reply 69 of 246

    Yes, the table is clear, I missed it. Although my suspicions were correct. It is also clear from the Note 3 comparison that the Snapdragon CPU, which is what Samsung sells nearly everywhere, is dramatically faster than the octacore experiment. Now that I look more clearly, it seems that the Note 4 Octacore is hardly any improvement from the Note 3 octacore; there is but a tiny bump in clock speed.

     

    However, the mass-market Note 4 has a next-generation snapdragon 805 clocked at 2.7GHz, which should be a significant boost on the Note 3 Snapdragon. Considering that the Note 3 is fairly close to the new iPhone, and actually superior in a couple of these benchmarks, testing based on the mass-market Note 4 should show a narrow gap. Maybe the real Note 4 will even be a match. Or better.

     

    Both of these expensive, flagship devices will perform at such a level that I doubt anyone will complain. People will probably make buying decisions where the differences are larger: OLED vs LCD screen, stylus, OS, apps, battery capacity, thinness, ruggedness.

  • Reply 70 of 246
    relicrelic Posts: 4,735member
    Infinity Blade.


    Except all are worse. OLED is the past. QD displays are the future.

    Hey Tallest, Infinity Blade is only for iOS, I'm sure if it was available for Android though, the Note 4 would have no problem running it. I think I would probably use my Nvidia Shield for a game like that, so I could hook it up to a 4K TV or monitor. Do you have any other games I could test, thanx.
  • Reply 71 of 246
    None of this is based on the Note 4 with the Snapdragon 805 chip set. This is all meaningless dribble. Please test the Note 4 so those of us that are actually interested in the real numbers can make an informed decision.
  • Reply 72 of 246

    I look at the chart, and see that the Snapdragon 805 (U.S. version of the Note 4 processor) is curiously missing. Was there no unit to test? Or did the outcome of the test muddy the waters of your comparison, and therefore dropped from the chart? If you are going to compare apples to...........

  • Reply 73 of 246
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    gatorguy wrote: »
    Using a PenTile arrangement isn't necessarily a black-mark. The most color accurate and strongest performing smartphone display yet tested is in fact an OLED using that diamond-pattern PenTile screen. In addition if OLED's were as inherently inefficient as you say Apple would not choose one for their Apple Watch would they?

    The Samsung Note might be a relatively poor performer with gaming just as DED claims but if so I don't think you can blame it on inefficient and poor display

    At this level of pixel density I agree that being PenTile or not isn't a big issue for color accuracy and visual perception, but the use of so many more sub pixels with comparatively fewer effective pixels are showing an issue with PenTile. To truly compete on graphics performance I see no other option than to move to a full RGB-RGB display.
  • Reply 74 of 246
    correctionscorrections Posts: 1,210member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Relic View Post





    Hey Tallest, Infinity Blade is only for iOS, I'm sure if it was available for Android though, the Note 4 would have no problem running it. I think I would probably use my Nvidia Shield for a game like that, so I could hook it up to a 4K TV or monitor. Do you have any other games I could test, thanx.



    Rather than asking for examples and then shooting them down over whatever nonsense you can throw up as a defense against the facts, why don't you just run through the top games listed in the iTunes App Store and compile your own list of major games that don't exist on Android and/or aren't playable on android (like the top tile in both iTunes and Google Play: "Five Nights at Freddies," which for some reason doesn't run right on your Nvidia Shield, which nobody else bought.)

     

    Seriously, if iPhone were Playstation and Android were Xbox, this would not even be a challenge and Microsoft would be giving up on its games franchise. Everyone knows Android has little more than IAP garbage-ware, and most of that looks like crap on various Android hardware experiments. 

     

    When Metal came out, AnandTech wrote that Metal would be used by 'the kinds of games that don't exist on Android.' What do you think they could have possibly meant? 

     

    Seriously, you sound like the curator of the Creation Museum trying to spread the idea that most people want complicated beta crap that works like a PC from the late 1990s. You are wrong, obviously. People with money have spoken, and they're not lining up for Nvidia Shields and Galaxy S5s. You can insist that there is a healthy ecosystem for Android all you want, but who do you think you're fooling? Yourself? 

  • Reply 75 of 246
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    I care more about user experience than benchmarks. Apple's problem isn't hardware where no one can touch them right now. It's the software that needs work. As much as Steve Jobs said Apple was a software company I still think hardware is where they've really excelled. I'd love to see Apple take a year and really refine and polish iOS. Fix the bugs. Take some of what they've done in Yosemite from a UI perspective and bring that to iOS. Especially the dark theme. There's not much missing feature wise (though I'd love to see Siri opened up to 3rd party developers) so it's a good time for a version of Snow-iOS. Maybe that's what iOS 8.5 or 9 will be.
  • Reply 76 of 246
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 12,641member
    mazecookie wrote: »

    All DED is pointing out is that the octacore processor Samsung is careful to market is not as powerful as a dual core processor Apple barely talks about.
    Well maybe. The problem with cores is that you need to use them. Further in the fase of big.LITTLE i think ARM fell off the deep end to come up with that idea. So lets look at these chips as quad cores. Given proper software those four cores could be leveraged to advantage. Samsungs failure here is more about the software stacks common on mobile platform, a lot of it simply does leverage those cores.

    Which begs the question, why use an eight core processor in the first place? The only logical answer is either their engineering team sucks, or they want to trick people into thinking an octacore processor is better than a dual core processor.
    Well obviously matjeting is a factor here. Given that though if Apple had more cores some of the software stack would legerage those cores right now. Grand Central Dispatch would assure that for apps using the facility. You still have the problem of the apps common in mobile simple not having as many oppotunities to go parallel as may a desktop app.


    Much in the same way every 12mp camera is better than an 8mp camera.
    Not really. Cameras have to obey the laws of physics. Being able to actually use the cores in a chip is a different issue altogether. For some apps cores can be fantastic for others only sinlge thread performance matters. You also have a massive number of apps that fit between those extremes.
    I'm all for an article pointing out specs do not mean performance.

    Actually i see this as DED at his worst. Specs are very important if you understand what is being discussed. The problem here is that the software platforms are so different that it really doesnt matter what the specs are for the hardware. If you could get iOS to run on one of those quad core chips i suspect that you woild be surprised at the results. Surprised my the mixed nature of the results to be more accurate.

    If you remember back a bit, when Grand Central Dispatch came to Mac OS many existing apps saw an immediate performance increase. That is if the developer folliwed Apples guidlines and the app had code sections that could benefit. Software makes a difference here when it comes to leveraging hardware.

    The funny thing here is that Java, real Java that is normally loves mukti core machines. That is Java and many of the apps built upon Java do leverage hardware cores due to miltithreading and other features. Eclipse is a good example here of an app that runs great if you have enough cores. So this makes me wonder what is happening with Android and Davik that it fails so badly. Poor interpreter? Poor JIT? Or is native execution a massive winner.
  • Reply 77 of 246
    MacProMacPro Posts: 17,776member
    mazecookie wrote: »

    All DED is pointing out is that the octacore processor Samsung is careful to market is not as powerful as a dual core processor Apple barely talks about.

    Which begs the question, why use an eight core processor in the first place? The only logical answer is either their engineering team sucks, or they want to trick people into thinking an octacore processor is better than a dual core processor.


    Much in the same way every 12mp camera is better than an 8mp camera.

    I'm all for an article pointing out specs do not mean performance.

    I was with you till the MP comment, which I read in contexts as meaning 8 is enough (if you didn't mean that we are on the same page). That old '8MP is all you need' meme is getting old. Having spent the weekend cropping down 20.2MP RAW images of wild life taken of a Canon 70D with a Canon 100-400mm L IS USM lens so critters fill the frame and still holding amazing resolution, I can assure anyone holding onto the '8MP Myth' that starting with more than 8MP is very useful.
  • Reply 78 of 246
    MacProMacPro Posts: 17,776member
    Right now, Apple is unmatchable in mobile semiconductor design. Only Intel comes close, but their insistance on using their own GPU designs is a limiting factor.

    nVidia is trying with Project Denver, but a 25W TDP is insane.

    The benefit of this is that A7 and A8 powered devices should serve their owners for quite a long time.


    And, TBH, I get the feeling that Apple's semiconductor team is seeking to compete with Intel's "big iron", so to speak, not their Atom chips. The A7 took a lot of features from Haswell, and the A8 leapfrogs it with h.265 support.

    Not saying we'll see a Mac Pro with an ARM chip any time soon, but the question becomes...when an Ax chip (or a pair) delivers "good enough" OS X performance, will we see them, in consumer grade products? Because I don't think Windows compatibility is nearly as important as it once was, and Microsoft has a very nice, very nearly feature complete version of Office 2013 that runs on ARM thanks to Windows RT...which I'm sure Satya would love to sell to Mac ARM users to recoup development expenses.

    I have been postulating this exact point for the last few years only I don't have your knowledge to back up what for me is just a gut feeling about the trend in Apple's direction. I even suggested that perhaps an addition Intel CPU might be a BTO on higher end Macs equipped with Apple "big iron" for those that do need to virtualize some Windows OS. I remember inserting CP/M-86 cards in Apple ][s so they could run non native OSs. For the most part, for the majority, those days are now behind us thankfully as Microsoft heads towards irrelevance and oblivion.
  • Reply 79 of 246
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by cali View Post



    I tried the iPhone 6 yesterday for the first time. Boy is that screen clear and colors are rich and real. Looks so good it almost looks fake. I guess my eyes have adjusted to low quality screens over time.

     

    I tried the iPhone 6 last week for the first time. Boy, does that screen look noticeably inferior to the 1080x1920 screens which have been available on comparable Android and Windows Phone devices for multiple years. I guess my eyes have adjusted to higher-quality screens over time.

  • Reply 80 of 246
    mdriftmeyermdriftmeyer Posts: 7,174member
    jexus wrote: »
    <div class="quote-container" data-huddler-embed="/t/182670/samsung-galaxy-note-4-delivers-poor-graphics-performance-vs-apple-iphone-6-plus/40#post_2613032" data-huddler-embed-placeholder="false"><span>Quote:</span><div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>lukei</strong> <a href="/t/182670/samsung-galaxy-note-4-delivers-poor-graphics-performance-vs-apple-iphone-6-plus/40#post_2613032"><img src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" class="inlineimg" alt="View Post"/></a><br/><br/><br />
    I suggest you look into the various anti competitive action related cases that show how Intel kept AMD down</div></div><p> </p>

    Which has nothing to do with the accuracy of my post, and like most people making the claims ignore AMD's own failings.

    AMD had technological leads and was making upwards of up to a billion in profits around 98-00. But from 01-05 and today

    They had terrible management, choosing to continuously fund development of unnecessary fab facilities, despite being explicitly warned against it.

    Had zero focus as a company. They were involved in memory, in logic, in microprocessors, communication products ect.... with almost no talent to properly spread across, resulting in shortages.

    When Intel became resurgent with the core 2 duo's...Did AMD strike back? Did AMD pour it's all into out competing Intel in the face of potential anti trust action? NO. They bought ATI for 5 billion and for years afterwards integrated as well as Sprint Nextel did.

    Then when AMD finally did get back to work it delivered two underperformers in Barcelona and later Bulldozer.

    And worst of all, AMD is it's own worst enemy. AMD has ALWAYS had this pseudo pleasure of being a #2, even when it was prime position to take #1

    But of course Blaming Intel is so much easier so most people stick with that.

    Intel paid AMD $1.05 Billion in a settlement to admit no fault, when they bribed the entire industry and collected tens of billions during the process. Guess what? Intel's innovations are running thin and the new management and industry heavyweight talent amassing at AMD [being treated like a seasoned start up] is going to pay huge dividends.

    Intel will never have Apple's mobile business and will eventually lose its desktop/laptop/workstation business.
Sign In or Register to comment.