Rdio responds to Apple Music with statement satirizing Apple reaction to IBM PC

Posted:
in iPod + iTunes + AppleTV edited June 2015
Rdio on Friday responded to this week's announcement of Apple Music, satirizing Apple marketing from 1981 as part of an argument that the company is doing nothing fundamentally new.




"Welcome, Apple. Seriously. Welcome to the most exciting and important frontier since the digital music revolution began 16 years ago," Rdio said, according to The Next Web. The words paraphrase Apple's response to IBM putting out its first personal computer. IBM-compatible PCs would eventually come to dominate the global computer market.

Rdio CEO Anthony Bay reportedly argued that iTunes began "really clean and simple," but has "gotten messy" since, and that Apple Music could get lost in the shuffle for people navigating its content. "So you have Apple Music next to podcasts and e-books and 'rent a movie' and 'buy a TV show', plus your own music, there's a risk of it being very confusing," he said. The executive described Rdio as a specialty shop next to Apple's department store.

He further criticized the originality of Apple's efforts. "When you look at where Apple has done remarkable things, it's when they do something new: the original Mac, the iPod, the iPhone, the iPad - those are all 'wow'.

"This is not that. This is another version of music," Bay remarked.

He nevertheless suggested that there is room for many different streaming services, since they all share similar music libraries.

Apple announced Apple Music during Monday's WWDC keynote. The service will launch on June 30, and eventually come to 100 countries, more than Rdio's current 85 and Spotify's 50.
«13456

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 103

    He has a point. iTunes has certainly become bloated over the years and imo the store itself needs to have a separate app from a music/television/movies app.

  • Reply 2 of 103
    Okay, well, enjoy bankruptcy. You and Spotify need to go.
  • Reply 3 of 103
    benjerbenjer Posts: 90member

    1999: "Consumer-level laptop? Nothing new."

     

    2007: "Smart phone? Nothing new."

     

    2010: "Tablet? Nothing new."

     

    2015: "Paid music streaming service? Nothing new."

  • Reply 4 of 103
    What do you mean? This is completely new.

    This is the opportunity for us to rent music, and not have to be burdened with owning an actual copy of said music.

    Not only that, for our good money, they will compress this music for us, so that we don't have to listen to it in that CD quality we all hate.

    It's like radio, only you get to pay for it.
  • Reply 5 of 103
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Lord Amhran View Post

     

    He has a point. iTunes has certainly become bloated over the years and imo the store itself needs to have a separate app from a music/television/movies app.




    No, he doesn't have a point. He has thinking that's a decade old.

     

    Quote:


    "So you have Apple Music next to podcasts and e-books and 'rent a movie' and 'buy a TV show', plus your own music, there's a risk of it being very confusing,"


    Nowhere in iOS is that true. He's still thinking with a desktop-centric model, and that's why he's wrong.

  • Reply 6 of 103
    tnsftnsf Posts: 203member
    If Apple Music was such a non-event then all these execs wouldn't be talking about it. But they are. A lot. Apple is the storm on the horizon if Apple does it right and all these execs know it.
  • Reply 7 of 103
    gudguygudguy Posts: 2member
    And Rdio, don't create the music and didn't invent digital content delivery, they are just another reseller, so no more, no less, not exactly world changing.
  • Reply 8 of 103
    Like Apple back in the day, Rdio is looking a little defensive and will probably be overtaken by the big players. Yes, Apple Music doesn't look quite as elegant out of the gate, but I have confidence that Apple can make it better and better. I mean, this is Apple we're talking about.
  • Reply 9 of 103
    theflythefly Posts: 72member

    I don't think when Apple ran the original ad they were defensive, more cocky, which came back to bite them.  Same thing with Rdio.  The difference though is that Apple doesn't run non-money making services.  Rdio hasn't made any profit yet, so it'll be interesting to see how long the tap will last for them.

  • Reply 10 of 103
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    Can't argue with this. And the muddled tone deaf presentation on Monday didn't help. Ben Thompson got it right when he said the music portion of the keynote showed a lack of focus. Even Jim Dalrymple said Jimmy Iovine and Drake were terrible and Iovine shouldn't be on stage at an Apple event again. The only positive argument I'm seeing for Apple Music is the power of defaults; that it will come installed on every device running iOS 8.4 or higher.

    Nothing Apple announced was innovative but it didn't need to be. Music doesn't need to be a big deal. This is what Apple should have done: have Eddy Cue on stage for 10-15 minutes max, and in bullet point fashion describe all the features of Apple Music. Just a simple streaming service that has access to the vast iTunes catalog, that allows for offline playlists, an easy way to import playlists from other streaming services and a great deal on family pricing. Fold iTunes Radio into the services as the free with ads option. Skip the stupid global radio station and social media feature. Skip all this human curation nonsense (if people really cared about that Beats Music would have been more successful than it was). Just keep it simple and keep the app uncluttered. That's all Apple needed to do. It doesn't need to "revolutionize" music.

    It still boggles my mind that Apple spent nearly 40 minutes on this when Phil Schiller said there was lots of stuff they cut from the keynote. So basically the iOS and OS X sections were cut short so Eddy Cue could spend 20 minutes giving us a demo of the music app. It boggles the mind. But maybe I shouldn't be surprised. Let's not forget Cue (and Iovine) thought it was a great idea to stick a U2 album in everyone's library as though they had purchased it and then later had to provide a tool for people to remove it if they wanted to. Bring Phil Schiller back on stage he's a much better stage presenter.
  • Reply 11 of 103
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by TheWhiteFalcon View Post

     



    No, he doesn't have a point. He has thinking that's a decade old.

     

    Nowhere in iOS is that true. He's still thinking with a desktop-centric model, and that's why he's wrong.


    In that part I agree with you on. iOS yes, it's fine

  • Reply 12 of 103
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    Okay, well, enjoy bankruptcy. You and Spotify need to go.

    Go where? I'm currently a paid Spotify subscriber and I'm very happy with the service. It's the height of arrogance to suggest they just need to go away because Apple now launched a subscription service of their own.
  • Reply 13 of 103
    nolamacguynolamacguy Posts: 4,758member
    it fails because it's a false analogy. while we all agree the pc revolution was a major historic event and industry, the same just isn't true for renting music online. many of us don't even have any interest in doing so.
  • Reply 14 of 103
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    Like Apple back in the day, Rdio is looking a little defensive and will probably be overtaken by the big players. Yes, Apple Music doesn't look quite as elegant out of the gate, but I have confidence that Apple can make it better and better. I mean, this is Apple we're talking about.

    Of course it won't be hard to be taken over by Apple. Apple has a huge warchest and can spend whatever they want on this service. Apple also has the power of defaults. Apple Music will be preinstalled on nearly every iOS device. Of course it's damn near impossible to compete with that.
  • Reply 15 of 103
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post





    Go where? I'm currently a paid Spotify subscriber and I'm very happy with the service. It's the height of arrogance to suggest they just need to go away because Apple now launched a subscription service of their own.



    Oh no, I'm not saying Apple should be the only game in town. Honest competition promotes excellence. But Spotify has played this in a disgusting manner, I simply want them to get their just desserts. You don't think these investigations start themselves, do you? And all the anti-Apple Music propaganda run by the Verge, was that coincidence? (Vox has shown years ago they're for sale to the highest bidder with no editorial integrity).

  • Reply 16 of 103
    nolamacguynolamacguy Posts: 4,758member
    rogifan wrote: »
    Even Jim Dalrymple said Jimmy Iovine and Drake were terrible and Iovine shouldn't be on stage at an Apple event again.

    Dalrymple is a has-been journalist who stopped producing any content of meaning years ago. his blog is being misused by his two chosen staffers...it's sad but there it is. his relevancy and authority on Apple no longer exist.

    as for presentations -- it's hard. if you watch the WWDC session vids, you'll see some even more painful speakers. I don't fault them for it, tho. unless you do it on a regular basis you'll probably suck at it, too.
  • Reply 17 of 103
    boeyc15boeyc15 Posts: 986member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post



    Can't argue with this. And the muddled tone deaf presentation on Monday didn't help. Ben Thompson got it right when he said the music portion of the keynote showed a lack of focus. Even Jim Dalrymple said Jimmy Iovine and Drake were terrible and Iovine shouldn't be on stage at an Apple event again. The only positive argument I'm seeing for Apple Music is the power of defaults; that it will come installed on every device running iOS 8.4 or higher.



    Nothing Apple announced was innovative but it didn't need to be. Music doesn't need to be a big deal. This is what Apple should have done: have Eddy Cue on stage for 10-15 minutes max, and in bullet point fashion describe all the features of Apple Music. Just a simple streaming service that has access to the vast iTunes catalog, that allows for offline playlists, an easy way to import playlists from other streaming services and a great deal on family pricing. Fold iTunes Radio into the services as the free with ads option. Skip the stupid global radio station and social media feature. Skip all this human curation nonsense (if people really cared about that Beats Music would have been more successful than it was). Just keep it simple and keep the app uncluttered. That's all Apple needed to do. It doesn't need to "revolutionize" music.



    It still boggles my mind that Apple spent nearly 40 minutes on this when Phil Schiller said there was lots of stuff they cut from the keynote. So basically the iOS and OS X sections were cut short so Eddy Cue could spend 20 minutes giving us a demo of the music app. It boggles the mind. But maybe I shouldn't be surprised. Let's not forget Cue (and Iovine) thought it was a great idea to stick a U2 album in everyone's library as though they had purchased it and then later had to provide a tool for people to remove it if they wanted to. Bring Phil Schiller back on stage he's a much better stage presenter.

    Cant argue with this either, well said.  Even the employee Fan Boys in the audience were like - 'Huh, what?!'  I almost could feel the 'cringing' through the screen. 

  • Reply 18 of 103
    softekysofteky Posts: 133member

    That approach from Rdio will likely work just about as well as it did for Apple in the 1980s.

     

    IIRC, that was just before the IBM PC and Microsoft grabbed 90+% of the desktop market.

  • Reply 19 of 103
    They might want to careful with their chosen historical analogy-- since IBM and MS went on to dominate the market with an arguably inferior offering. If anything this shows Apple didn't take their competition seriously. So are they planning to make the same mistake?
  • Reply 20 of 103
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by NolaMacGuy View Post





    Dalrymple is a has-been journalist who stopped producing any content of meaning years ago. his blog is being misused by his two chosen staffers...it's sad but there it is. his relevancy and authority on Apple no longer exist.

    There are MANY who would disagree with your assessment

Sign In or Register to comment.