It's time to uninstall Adobe's Flash from your Mac - here's how

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  • Reply 61 of 117
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,778member
    aishane wrote: »
    For the same reason that it's safer for police officers to handcuff someone and place them in the squad car, rather than let them stand around outside: even if they slip the cuffs, they're still contained.

    There are two issues, privacy and security. My point was I trust Google less than Adobe for the former. So Click to Flash and Safari gives me a lot more security than allowing Flash free reign and privacy. I know it is a trade off.
  • Reply 62 of 117
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,778member
    mstone wrote: »
    MacroMind Director was a brilliant application. I wrote a lot of cool stuff with it back in the day.

    Oh memories ... I hurt my back carrying the manual! lol
  • Reply 63 of 117
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,778member
    For anyone wanting to use the BBC website without Flash: Enable the "Develop" menu in Safari (the option is in the "Advanced" preferences tab) and then select Develop > User Agent > IOS8.1/iPad. The tab will reload the content as HTML5 and it plays perfectly.

    Thank you for that! It would never have occurred to me. Gotta love AI's members' helpfulness :)
  • Reply 64 of 117
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by ThePixelDoc View Post



    There's just a few "details" and "statements made" that bother me to this day why and how Adobe went about killing off FreeHand. Rather than turning it loose (selling it) or continuing to at least update for OS advancements.

    As I recall they did not have the complete rights to the software. Altsys licensed it to Aldus which then transferred to Macromedia and finally to Adobe. When Adobe acquired MacroMedia, the FH license was not part of the deal. Adobe tried to give the software back to Altsys but they were out of business so nobody actually owns the software at this point.  I think that is why FH10 is still available for free. Adobe does not have a license to sell it.

  • Reply 65 of 117
    knowitallknowitall Posts: 1,648member
    aishane wrote: »
    As far as I'm aware, they busted the Chrome sandbox by piggybacking on a Windows 0day; Google mitigated within hours. Chrome is still the best option by far if you must use Flash.

    Safari runs in a sandbox so it should be as safe.
  • Reply 66 of 117
    thepixeldocthepixeldoc Posts: 2,257member
    mstone wrote: »
    As I recall they did not have the complete rights to the software. Altsys licensed it to Aldus which then transferred to Macromedia and finally to Adobe. When Adobe acquired MacroMedia, the FH license was not part of the deal. Adobe tried to give the software back to Altsys but they were out of business so nobody actually owns the software at this point.  I think that is why FH10 is still available for free. Adobe does not have a license to sell it.

    There's "maybe" some truth behind what you stated, even though FreeHand MX (11) was the last version, and for a time it most definitely was being sold by Adobe. I had clients that bought additional seats even though I had told them that the rumor mill said it was going to be canned. And because clients are always right, you know who ate that and will never forget to add certain contract hangers to the billing in situations like that again (like that will change anything in the end when dealing with a big client :no:)
  • Reply 67 of 117
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by AdonisSMU View Post

     

    HTML5 is a catch all for HTML/JS/CSS3.




    Well, In my opinion it shouldn't be. It leads to confusion. I'll stick with the Wikipedia definition of HTML5. Not once on that page is JS or CSS mentioned.

     

    If you want a catch-all you should probably just use 'modern web development.' because that would include things like openType, SVG, XHTML, XML, Ajax, DOM, scripting languages such as php and database connections. Using HTML5 as a web technology catch-all is like saying all vehicles are cars.

  • Reply 68 of 117

    So you propose replacing one poor security software with resource consuming and tracking software from Google?

    I am not going to use Chrome again... after 10 years of using it - the only performing browser on the market that has no hidden associations with commercial market (read: does not impose some garbage) and controls phishing out of the box - is SeaMonkey based on Mozilla. Hence I need Flash plugin. It also runs on older slower Mac OS X hardware unlike Chrome, Safari or even Firefox with videos.

  • Reply 69 of 117

    ... also we caught Google in the past that Chrome took corporate account data and stored on their servers. How we did it? One of former employees was able to retrieve that while working in different company. It was nice to have loyal alumni, but perhaps people do not know about holes like this in Chrome and about scope of Google server storing data. Basically Chrome may be banned from some companies.

  • Reply 70 of 117
    knowitallknowitall Posts: 1,648member
    mstone wrote: »

    Well, In my opinion it shouldn't be. It leads to confusion. I'll stick with the Wikipedia definition of HTML5. Not once on that page is JS or CSS mentioned.

    If you want a catch-all you should probably just use 'modern web development.' because that would include things like openType, SVG, XHTML, XML, Ajax, DOM, scripting languages such as php and database connections. Using HTML5 as a web technology catch-all is like saying all vehicles are cars.

    Your right, but HTML5 is a part of common language now and stand for 'modern web development' or non Flash web development.
  • Reply 71 of 117
    knowitallknowitall Posts: 1,648member
    Do not enable automatic Flash updates, it's clear that Adobe has no clue about security and the auto update tool is an ideal attack vector.
  • Reply 72 of 117
    knowitallknowitall Posts: 1,648member
    Aaand, don't use MS Silverlight, it's a dead horse and bloatware.
    MS extorted some media companies in using it but other than that it's rarely seen.
    Also MS isn't exactly known for its perfect security record.
    Uninstall it while you can.
  • Reply 73 of 117
    knowitallknowitall Posts: 1,648member
    Uninstalling Flash is an excellent idea, cudos for suggesting it.
    It's a pity that some educators seem to be stuck in the Flash hell.
    I would advice anyone to complain loudly when forced to use it.
    Arguments like security and lack of flash on mobile devices work well (note that Flash on Android is more of a formality and not of practical use, it's also not officially supported by Adobe and very limited in implementation).
  • Reply 74 of 117
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,388member

    Have I finally contracted full blown dementia? What year is this, 2007?

     

    NOTE: Many websites that still force Flash on the desktop can be tricked into showing a QuickTime window (which also lets you download the video) by simply switching your user agent to iPad Safari instead.

  • Reply 75 of 117
    cornchipcornchip Posts: 1,953member
    tmay wrote: »
    Rhino is more for Industrial Design and Art in my opinion, whereas SolidWorks is targeted at mechanical design for manufacture. With T-splines, you can import NURB surfaces into SolidWorks without issue; best of both worlds. The same might be said for Modo, but you have to use their export to SolidWorks workflow.

    Autodesk owns T-Splines, and Siemens owns Parasolids, the kernel for SolidWorks.

    Yeah, rhino is good for a few things and renders are really good with the V-ray plugin which is part of the reason it was preferred in my program (Industrial Design). I know Apple's CAD monkeys use Rhino. It's quick, albeit dirty, and can yield nice results in the right hands. But for what we do where I work and our workflow using Rhino is just nuts.
    konqerror wrote: »
    SolidWorks is awful and has been abandonware for the last 5 years. People only learn SolidWorks because that's what they've been taught. As you recall, it was purchased by Dassault in 1997 and since then they've been trying to migrate it over to become CATIA lite. As tmay pointed out, it uses their competitor's solid modeling engine. Only problem is that CATIA is a completely incompatible change with a different engine, and second CATIA is a client-server environment, which means SolidWorks will become a subscription cloud environment.

    At work, we dumped SolidWorks for Siemens NX (the lite version is SolidEdge) and everybody agreed it was better, especially since we didn't have the annual incompatible update madness.

    Yeah, I don't know much about the ins&outs & technicalities with all that, and SolidWorks may very well be abandonware, but for what we do, it's the ideal package. I know CATIA is a pretty advanced package, but it's much more than my company needs, and also, my company is VERY cheap.
  • Reply 76 of 117
    knowitallknowitall Posts: 1,648member
    vavatch wrote: »

    I can see how you might be a bit confused here. 

    JavaScript and Flash really are not at all alike except that something is downloaded to your computer to be processed, but by that very broad definition, HTML, CSS, and indeed image files, audio files, video files, etc., are also the same thing.

    In fact, HTML, CSS and JavaScript have far more in common than JavaScript and Flash do, as all three are languages, which are coded, placed on the web server, downloaded and then interpreted by the client (browser). Flash, on the other hand, is coded, then compiled into a non-executable binary file, which then requires the Flash runtime engine in order to actually 'play.' You can view and edit the downloaded Javascript, HTML, and CSS from any website, in real time using the developer console in Safari, and similar in other browsers, but you cannot do the same with Flash.

    With Flash, you MUST have the runtime to play, and you cannot modify the Flash binary without using a specialised tool that attempts to reverse engineer it and recreate code that, in theory, duplicates the original code. However, in reality, that is all but impossible to actually do. 

    So, in other words, the downloaded HTML, CSS and JavaScript are absolutely identically coded when it was written and when it was interpreted in the Browser. Flash binaries are completely different from the source code they were created from.

    If I am getting to esoteric here, and I may (likely) be overinferring your intention, and if so, I sincerely apologise. I get sucked into these things easily because I have both been doing web design for over 20 years, and have taught a few courses on the subject over the years. I was, as well, an early (forced) user (and equally early, and VERY harsh, critic) of Flash, and it's predecessor, Splash, which 'Macromafia' acquired, and subsequently ruined. Ironically, Splash was actually much like JavaScript as it was a language, which was downloaded to the client machine, but needed a runtime interpreter to create the animations and effects because the browser could not on it's own. Simply put, the Splash runtime read the clear-text Splash code and interpreted it. Which to add a grand irony to things. That is, of course, how HTML5 works 9the interpreter is merely built into the browser rendering engine instead of being a plugin. :)

    Very well put!
    I hope you explain this to a lot of people.
  • Reply 77 of 117
    bobschlobbobschlob Posts: 1,074member

    If you need Flash in order to use the Flash based website that you 'have to use'. Then that is that. No uninstalling Flash for me.

    Pressure really needs to come down on the developers to stop building Flash into their websites.

    In any case; I stopped using "clicktoflash" a long time ago; and now I just have my Flash plugin settings in Safari set to "Ask" if Flash should be allowed or blocked on a site by site basis. Works in the same manner that LittleSnitch does, but for Flash instead.

    Very happy this way. (But still look for a time in the future when Flash will be no more)

  • Reply 78 of 117
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    knowitall wrote: »
    Your right, but HTML5 is a part of common language now and stand for 'modern web development' or non Flash web development.

    So what happens when we get to HTML6? Does the catch all term HTML5 instantly fall out of common language usage in referring to modern web development or does the definition change to then mean obsolete web development?
  • Reply 79 of 117
    mj webmj web Posts: 918member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by palomine View Post



    Linda.com is a video training site, I believe they use Flash exclusively. What happens to their content I wonder? Is there a way they can port existing content to some other format? What a headache for them!



    Supposedly because there is so much granular detail, screen-in- screen demonstrations of video software, they claim that other platforms are unsuitable.



    Linda is loyal to Adobe because Adobe is the main conduit for her business. I use ClickToFlash.

  • Reply 80 of 117
    I was, for a while, using ClickToFlash and Chrome for when I wanted a dedicated Flash browser. But the automatic updates for flash weren't working%u2014I had to go to their website, download the app, quit the browser, run through their installer... or maybe it was working and it's just a crappy process? In any case, I've had it and removed the plugin a couple weeks ago.

    You can always launch Chrome when there's actually something with Flash that warrants going out of your way to launch another browser. It's a shame Chrome is so poor in terms of battery life.
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