Windows 10 adoption up to 75M devices nearly one month after launch, Microsoft says

Posted:
in General Discussion edited August 2015
Adoption of Microsoft's Windows 10 operating system has already hit 75 million devices nearing the end of its first month, a marketing executive announced on Wednesday.




The OS has been installed on over 90,000 unique PC and tablet models, some dating back to 2007, said Yusuf Mehdi, Microsoft's VP of marketing for Windows and devices. He noted that the company has also seen six times more Windows Store app downloads per device than with Windows 8.

Aided by being a free upgrade for many Windows users, the pace of Windows 10 adoption has been much faster than Windows 7 or 8. Windows 8 saw sales of approximately 40 million licenses in its first month, while Windows 7 took two months to hit 60 million.

As Windows remains the most popular desktop and laptop OS -- representing over 90 percent of July online traffic monitored by NetMarketShare -- even 75 million is a relatively small percentage of Microsoft's userbase. Research firm Gartner estimated that the combined PC industry shipped 68.4 million computers in the June quarter alone, of which less than 4.8 million were Macs, the only other major computing platform.

OS X Yosemite, a free update for owners of Mavericks, managed to reach about 12.8 percent of Mac users within its first week. Roughly three and a half months later, that figure rose to 49 percent.

Microsoft will need to maintain rapid adoption to meet its goal of having Windows 10 on a billion devices within three years. The company should be helped by a variety of factors, including free upgrades for the first year, PCs shipping with the software pre-installed, and it being a universal OS adaptable to tablets and phones.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 84
    kent909kent909 Posts: 694member
    Yeah I put it on my work computer and had booting issues. After installing the first Windows Update sent out the machine would not boot at all. Fortunately the roll back to Windows 7 was easy and sucessful. Since I have a 3 year old Dell Insperon, maybe I expect too much. /s
  • Reply 2 of 84

    lol, botnet.

     

    I’m still going to install it, but I’ll be heavily modifying the hosts file and monitoring outgoing connections. If Microsoft feels that they can circumvent their own hosts file, I’ll teach myself how to block connections at the modem itself.

     

    OH AND DID I MENTION THAT WINDOWS 7 AND WINDOWS 8 RECEIVED FORCED UPDATES TO DO THE EXACT SAME? 

     

    I don’t think I did.

  • Reply 3 of 84

    There are probably between 1 and 2 billion PCs worldwide. Let's take the midpoint, 1.5B.

     

    So, 5% have switched to Windows 10. Wow, you could have knocked me over with a feather....

  • Reply 4 of 84
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

     

    There are probably between 1 and 2 billion PCs worldwide. Let's take the midpoint, 1.5B.

     

    So, 5% have switched to Windows 10. Wow, you could have knocked me over with a feather....




    How many installed it, took one look at it, scratched their head, read the reviews about privacy and wiped it?

    I did just that in a VM. Total life of the VM < 10 hours. Gone and won't be coming back anytime soon.

  • Reply 5 of 84
    Yes, I have Windows 10 on my Dell. Which I have not turned on for awhile, so there's that.
  • Reply 6 of 84

    It would be interesting to see the breakdown between PCs and other devices upgrading to Windows 10.  

     

    More interesting would be finding how many are upgrading from Windows 8 (fleeing) or upgrading from Windows 7.  I would suspect the bulk of the upgrades would be Windows 8 upgraders since Windows 7 users have shown less interest in upgrading quickly.

  • Reply 7 of 84
    The bulk of the "privacy issues" people complain about in Windows 10 were applied to Windows 7 and 8 as updates. If you are fully patched on 7 or 8 but complaining about 10 then you are woefully uninformed.
  • Reply 8 of 84

    I have it. Its a well designed OS, unlike 8. I installed it on my Macbook.  Some nice dedicated apps that aren't on Mac, like Netflix, Hulu and Flipboard.  Very nice to have if you are in IT too. 

     

    I'm not sure if all this privacy issues is paranoia or not.  I still put limited use into it but from what I see, Microsoft is on the right track again. 

  • Reply 9 of 84
    schlackschlack Posts: 673member
    nice update in raw numbers, but surprised the differential against Win 7 or Win 8 are not greater, considering that Win 10 is a free upgrade and Win 7/8 were not.
  • Reply 10 of 84
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Noicc1138 View Post

     

    I have it. Its a well designed OS, unlike 8. I installed it on my Macbook.  Some nice dedicated apps that aren't on Mac, like Netflix, Hulu and Flipboard.  Very nice to have if you are in IT too. 

     

    I'm not sure if all this privacy issues is paranoia or not.  I still put limited use into it but from what I see, Microsoft is on the right track again. 


     

    If your all worried about privacy issues - you should not install consumer modems..... install enterprise ones that have firewalls out as well as in :p

  • Reply 11 of 84
    lymflymf Posts: 65member
    I think when corporations will agree to update their entire networks the number will grow substantially. How many of these computers are own by a company and managed my sysadmins?
  • Reply 12 of 84
    roakeroake Posts: 609member



    There was once a time where I snickered at Mac users, with their one-button mouse and lack-of-understanding about anything technical; seemed that only language labs and art rooms used them.  "Get rid of that Mac and get a real computer," I would tell them.

     

    Times have changed.

     

    I do still have one windows machine in the house, but everything else is either MacOS or iOS.  The Windows machine runs Windows 7.  I hate Windows 8.  I refuse to install Windows 10.

     

    My solution is simple; no more Windows machines.  Screw Microsoft.  Screw 'em!  I don't even install VM's any more to run Windows on my Macs.

     

    For now, MacOS.  I also see the appeal of Linux, but MacOS serves my needs quite well.

     

    You had a good run, Microsoft.  It was nice knowing you.  RIP!

  • Reply 13 of 84

    Installed on a new gaming build my son and I did a few weekends ago. So far so good. All the games run well.

  • Reply 14 of 84
    dtracedtrace Posts: 59member
    Microsoft needs only to keep Windows 10 as their flagship OS, so long as new PCs come with it and reasonably recently purchased hardware can run it, the rate of adoption doesn't really matter. They've already said Windows 10 is going to be _the_ version of Windows for the foreseeable future, meaning Windows 10 will get feature upgrades and enhancements while still being labeled "Windows 10." This is presumably to knock off those clinging to old versions, 8, 7, Vista, and XP. Let's say "Windows 10" lasts 5 years as a brand, by the end of that period the majority of PCs will be on it and it doesn't matter how quickly the platform achieved that.

    Microsoft would probably prefer to have people wait until the free upgrade period is over anyway, to get people paying to upgrade. But now, they're just building a really solid user base, kind of a win-win for Microsoft.
  • Reply 15 of 84
    mike1mike1 Posts: 1,748member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

     

    There are probably between 1 and 2 billion PCs worldwide. Let's take the midpoint, 1.5B.

     

    So, 5% have switched to Windows 10. Wow, you could have knocked me over with a feather....


    Slightly flawed analysis. First, You need Windows 7 or higher aleady. I'd bet hundreds of millions of those PCs are using an older OS. Second, MS did not push Windows  10 to all users at launch. The roll out is gradual. The more telling stat is how many of those 75M are new computers and how many are upgrades.

  • Reply 16 of 84
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mike1 View Post

     

    Slightly flawed analysis. First, You need Windows 7 or higher aleady. I'd bet hundreds of millions of those PCs are using an older OS. Second, MS did not push Windows  10 to all users at launch. The roll out is gradual. The more telling stat is how many of those 75M are new computers and how many are upgrades.


     

    Additionally Enterprises -- it is not free.  Then you have all the devices that are not PCs running old software (there are lots of ATMs running unsupported versions of Windows :p).

  • Reply 17 of 84
    So basically, if we go by net applications and gartner estimates, OSX has just over 100 Million users and 3 months later, about 50% have upgraded giving apple about 33M upgrades per month. Not that impressive considering there is exactly one device OEM which controls everything and can push the update down to everything with ease. Contrast that to windows moving 75M machines upwards in less than a month. That is quite amazing.

    Off course the install base will soon surpass OSX, as soon as next month probably. But even compared to 7, which only sold to retail channels (not installs) 30M in its first month, we can see this is unprecedented in a mature stablished market. It may very well be the fastest upgrade on a unit basis in the history of MS, if not the world.

    impressive.
  • Reply 18 of 84
    Not surprising after the 8.X version was so cruddy.
  • Reply 19 of 84
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dtrace View Post



    Microsoft needs only to keep Windows 10 as their flagship OS, so long as new PCs come with it and reasonably recently purchased hardware can run it, the rate of adoption doesn't really matter. They've already said Windows 10 is going to be _the_ version of Windows for the foreseeable future, meaning Windows 10 will get feature upgrades and enhancements while still being labeled "Windows 10." This is presumably to knock off those clinging to old versions, 8, 7, Vista, and XP. Let's say "Windows 10" lasts 5 years as a brand, by the end of that period the majority of PCs will be on it and it doesn't matter how quickly the platform achieved that.



    Microsoft would probably prefer to have people wait until the free upgrade period is over anyway, to get people paying to upgrade. But now, they're just building a really solid user base, kind of a win-win for Microsoft.

    They would be idiots if they wanted people to wait just so they would pay for Windows.  The reason why it is sooooo important for Microsoft and why it is worth it to send it out as a "freemium" upgrade is because of the app store.   I don't remember the app store on Windows 7, but it has to be there now ????   without the app store they cannot make their cut on additional sales.

  • Reply 20 of 84
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by rotateleftbyte View Post

     



    How many installed it, took one look at it, scratched their head, read the reviews about privacy and wiped it?

    I did just that in a VM. Total life of the VM < 10 hours. Gone and won't be coming back anytime soon.




    statcounter and netapplications show pretty healthy growth but we'll have to see their august summary to really co-relate the stats. steam hardware stats also show incredible growth even within the windows ecosystem block. Overall it seems that the only point of dissent is not if it is a hit, but just how big.

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